Pictures of the trains that bought the passengers to Southampton


Hitch

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Jan 6, 2006
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Hey everyone.
Can anyone post pictures of the three trains that brought the passengers from the Londense Waterloo Station to Southampton? I really need them. Are there any pictures of the inside of these trains?

Thanks.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Carl, I doubt if it even occured to anybody to go out of their way to make a special record of any one of these trains. They were simply the routine work-a-day convayance to get the passengers to the docks, and one of any number that came and went every day.
 

Andrew Fanner

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Nov 5, 2003
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Carl.

I suggest you search the web for "London and South Western Railway" of "LSWR" and "carriage", you may find some pictures. The stock will have differed according to class of passenger being carried and it is quite possible that the locomotive will have differed too, with a more "glamorous" locomotive hauling the first class boat train and a more workaday on for the third class passengers.

The National Railway Museum in York may be able to help but they usually need fairly specific questions. For the next week or so they are rather busy with RailFest 2004 so don't expect any quick response.

Michael. It is not impossible that a record of which locomotives were used for the boat trains has survived, the trick is to find where it went!
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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There are photos of parts of the boat train on pages 47-49 of Father Browne's Titanic Album.

There's bound to be a huge amount of information and photos in Britain. Railway enthusiasts are like the Titanic rivet counters and collect every possible detail. The same goes for model railway fans.
 

Hitch

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Thank you so much everyone for your information. I really apriciate it.
Thanks Bob, for those pictures. They where just what I needed. Thank you.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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You're welcome, Carl. Here's another image of one of the colourful LSWR boat trains from the Edwardian period. Same coaches (known as 'Eagles') and a slightly earlier design of express locomotive.
86699.jpg
 

Hitch

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Oh, thanks Bob. So sweet of you.
Is this the same train as the one'se used for Titanic passengers?
 

Bob Godfrey

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Certainly these would be the same type of coaches, known as 'Eagle' or 'American Eagle' high quality saloons. They each cost well over £1000 to build (about the same as a Rolls Royce car) and date from the 1890s when the LSWR first set about attracting the high-class liner traffic to Southampton. Though there were boat trains made up only of 1st Class coaches (usually 5), the Eagle sets could also be organised rather like the liners, with 1st, 2nd and 3rd Class sections to the train, which of course did not connect. There was even a smoking compartment and ladies only compartment in one or more of the 1st Class coaches, and of course baggage cars at the front and rear of the train. Dining cars were included for the run to Plymouth, but not on the shorter route to Southampton.

The trains used various types of locomotive, including this one which dates from about 1900 and that shown in the postcard, which was a later design but very similar. None of these had any special connection with boat trains. They were standard express locomotives and hundreds were in service on all routes.

Now, as usual from me, a little bit of irrelevance! Several years before Titanic, a LSWR Plymouth boat train was involved in a major disaster of its own. Travelling at over 60mph in a 30mph zone, it overturned on a tight curve near Salisbury. All the crew and half the passengers were killed. It seems that the boat trains as well as the boats sometimes ran the risk of running at full steam into danger zones.
 

Andrew Fanner

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And for similar reasons.

The LSWR and GWR were in fierce competition to carry the passengers and mails respectively to London from the transatlantic liners which called first at Plymouth. The LSWR line at Salisbury has a sharp curve which caused a loss of speed at Salisbury. As Bob says, a major accident. The speed restriction still exists today, as well as the official rule that severely limits the speed with which a train may pass through Salisbury station.

Have a look at:
http://www.semg.org.uk/proto/srrescen.html
which is a good research resource.

Try also:
http://www.semg.org.uk/coach/lswr_co_01.html
for a "real" LSWR carriage, the restoration of which was a bit controversial, see the text.

The Salisbury Accident:
http://www.semg.org.uk/steam/l12class_01.html
 

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