Pitman in the Movie


Logan Geen

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Dec 2, 2001
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Hey everyone, I have the book Jame's Cameron's Titanic which is the fantastic book detailing the making of the movie. There is a picture of Captain Smith with his officers, that includes Third Officer Pitman (played by Kevin de la Noy, according to the book). However, I also own the illustrated screenplay and there isn't a single reference anywhere about Pitman. Nor was he in the credits. Does anyone have any info as to why Pitman was absent or what is up with that? Thanks,
Logan
 
Jan 31, 2001
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Pitman's not visible in the film. He left the ship fairly early in the sinking, and I have been told on a past thread that that is why he is not shown. Him even being featured is news to me! Perhaps he was in one of the deleted scenes.


Cheers,
happy.gif


-B.W.
 
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Aydan Dimitri Casey

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The only film where I remember a mention to Pitman is ANTR where Capt.Smith says "...Mr Wilde and Mr Pitman will remain on the bridge". Other than that I don't think any Titanic movie mentions him.
P.S. The meeting of officers on the bridge featured in every Titanic movie is no moviemakers invention. Walter Lord first describes it in ANTR (the book) and Joseph Boxhall alludes to it in a taped interview I have.
 

Inger Sheil

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Feb 9, 1999
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Not forgotten by us - indeed, Jemma and I have been spending quite a bit of time recently focusing on this particular officer. We've been turning up some interesting material.

Pitman was also depicted in the 1984 German telemovie - he was extraordinarily youthful, sans moustache (which, perhaps, was why Lightoller was wearing one...they were sharing it around).

I don't think there was a meeting as such, Aydan. Smith might have noticed that they were missing an officer (Lowe) if there had been. Can you cite the exact passages in ANTR and the Boxhall to which you're referring? As I recall it, some orders were given, but there was no assembing of all the senior crew. Lord, for example, refers to Smith giving out a sequence of orders - say, Moody to get out the list of boat assignments. This comes from Olliver's testimony, in which he says that Moody told him get the list - it is assumed that the initial order to Moody came from Smith and it was passed down the line, but there is no evidence that Smith initiated it in a meeting on the bridge.
 
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Aydan Dimitri Casey

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My info comes from a programme on the old 2JJ (now 2JJJ) ABC radio, where Boxhall remembers the moment of impact.The programme was called "The Story of the Titanic" and should still be available. As for my referencing of Lord, its going to be a little difficult since its been a while since I read him. But he does relate details of some sort of meeting, On page 34 of the Penguin Edition(1998), Lord wrote"Captain Smith ordered Chief Officer Wilde to uncover the boats...First Officer Murdoch to muster the passengers...Sixth Officer Moody to get out the list of Boat Assignments....Fourth Officer Boxhall to wake up Second Officer Lightoller and Third Officer Pitman.The Captain himself then walked about twenty yards down the port side of the boat deck to the wireless shack". Notice 5th Officer Lowe is left out.Lowe says in his testimony to the senate inquiry that this was because he was asleep.
 

Inger Sheil

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I've listened to the Boxhall interview in its entirety, Aydan (the programme repeated only excerpts), and don't remember any assemby of the officers along the lines you're suggesting. Certainly some officers were already there and others reported there during the course of the evening, but not a general gathering and issuing of orders.

That Lord quote underlines my point - it's pulled together from various sources (mostly the inquiries), and is not indicative of a general gathering and issuing of orders. Olliver, as I said above, is the source for the information about Moody getting out the list of boat assignments - because Moody asked him to fetch them. Olliver makes no reference to how Moody received the order. We know - or assume - Boxhall was ordered to wake up Pitman and Lightoller (and Lowe too, apparently - he told Lowe he did so later, but Lowe didn't recall it), but we don't know the circumstances under which the order was issued.

I suggest that Smith issued orders to what officers were at hand, but did not call them all together and address them.
 
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Sarah Bellum

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The movie went horrifically over budget. Pitman didn't really play a major part in the sinking, he was the first bridge officer off the ship. In the movie he probably didn't have enough lines to warrant paying him as a day player, they probably paid him per line, and since they were running out of money just decided to cut him altogether.
 

Neil McRae

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Apr 16, 2001
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Pitman was also MIA in the 1996 mini-series with Catherine Zeta-Jones and George C. Scott. Oddly enough, so were Wilde and Andrews!
 

Inger Sheil

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Not to mention Moody, although his character was rather amalgamated with Boxhall - "Boxy"? "Moodhall"? No wonder Boxhall sounded rather upset with Murdoch at the end...poor man should have already been away in a lifeboat, but he was taking Moody's role and going down with the ship.
 
Aug 31, 2015
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001XepFrgy6I6hqtGY54d.jpgHere is same photo appeared in James Cameron's Titanic Book. There are all officer with Captain Smith except Wilde. There are from left to right: 6th Officer Moody (Edward Fletcher), 2nd Officer Lightoller (Jonathan Phillips), 3rd Officer Pitman (Kevin De La Noy), Captain Smith (Bernard Hill), 4th Officer Boxhall (Simon Crane), 1st Officer Murdoch (Ewan Stewart) and 5th Officer Lowe (Ioan Gruffudd)

001XepFrgy6I6hqtGY54d.jpg
 

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