PLZ was it TRUE or just the movie


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AL Glover

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Jun 4, 2002
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Hello all, last night watched the video again (as enjoyable as the 1st time seeing it) James Cameron's Titanic ..
WOULD like to ask if anyone knows, maybe one of the survivors,(but they may not since most were just babies.very young)

In the movie (2) things,
#1 DID or DID not one of the life boats return to the sinking site & try to pick up more survivors that may have been in the water??
#, 2 when on one of the research trips to the big T,one this trip, researchers wanted to find out for sure was there a 300 foot gash or just a # of small holes in the front side,(proven a # of small punctures)
QUESTION:;while the research was being done,did anyone find out ""how deep the bow,front section was BURIED in the sea floor
 

Inger Sheil

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The claim in Cameron's movie that only one boat out of the twenty boats floating nearby made an effort to rescue survivors is a bit of an oversimplification.

Prior to the Titanic's final plunge, the crew of one of the last boats launched - #4 - were already picking up people out of the water. After pulling away during the Titanic's death throes, they returned to pick up some more before leaving the immediate scene of the sinking and joining the boats under Fifth Officer Lowe's charge.

D also picked up a man out of the water, but he swam after the lifeboat after it was launched.

Lowe returned with a crew cobbled together from the men under his charge some time after the sinking (#14's rescue efforts are those depicted in Cameron's movie).

To say that only one out of 20 took action doesn't quite tell the full story - of those 20, two (collapsibles A and B) could barely save themselves, let alone anyone else. Collapsible D was very heavily laden with the passengers that Lowe had transferred from #14 to give himself a near-empty boat to return to try and pull people from the water. 12 and 4 had been instructed by Lowe to remain together and wait for his return.

~ Inger
 
Jan 31, 2001
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I believe the forward-most part of the bow section is buried in about fifty feet of sediment. I'm not certain that's the exact depth, but it's very close.


Cheers,
happy.gif


-B.W.
 
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Mikael Jonsson

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how do I translate feet into meter. I have no clue....?
 

Mark Baber

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>how do I translate feet into meter

There are twelve inches to a foot and 39.37 inches to a meter. So to convert feet to meters, multiply the number of feet by twelve, then divide by 39.37. Fifty feet is about 15.5 m.
(50 x 12 = 600; 600/39.37 = 15.54483108966217932 4358648717297)
 

josh cox

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Dec 31, 2005
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i have been wondering about this question i have. so i figured i would post it here, i have been reading the messages and you people seem to really know about titanic. first off, i have really been enjoying reading the posted messages. i have always been fascinated with titanic. and this site has enabled me to learn so much more. my question is this. i recently bought a 4 video set of a documentary on A&E about tianic. it says that the carpathia picked up 13 life boats. but i thought there was 20. i know two were collapsables a and b. were they just left in the water?. what happened to the other 7 boats?. if anyone can answer this, i'd greatly appreciate it. josh
 

Dave Gittins

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Carpathia picked up 11 large lifeboats, plus the two emergency boats. That left four collapsible boats and three large boats to drift.

Collapsibles A and B were found by Oceanic and Baltic respectively. Collapsible A was taken to New York, but the other drifting boats were never seen again.

It's a bit odd that this happened, as the lifeboats had large metal buoyancy tanks and the collapsibles had double bottoms filled with cork.
 
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DAVE: In regard to the lost lifeboats of Titanic, it is "a bit odd that this happened". I have been shown a photograph of a similar lifeboat aboard an unidentified ship - not 'Oceanic' or 'Baltic' - which has evidently been taken from the sea months later and become the object of much attention. The major British expert who showed it to me wondered, as I did, if it might have been one of Titanic's. I told him that there was a legend originating in northern Prince Edward Island, Canada, that another boat had drifted there and was brought ashore and stored in a barn. That currents could have carried it there has been, I believe, dismissed as plainly impossible. The experienced seamen who found it can't have known that - nor the local fishing community. DON
 

Dave Gittins

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If an ordinary lifeboat from Titanic was found there would have been no doubt about where it came from. The boats carried metal plates showing the ship's name and plates with the White Star pennant. They also had metal numbers on them.

There are other stories of debris from Titanic showing up in unlikely places. The sinking gave rise to tall stories galore and still does. Where is the hard evidence?
 

Dave Gittins

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By the way, the missing lifeboats were numbers 4, 14 and 15. Anybody who can produce one of them is sitting on a goldmine!
 
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