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Irving Berlin was certainly in vogue in 1912, and there was a thriving undergound blues and jazz scene sweeping Chicago and New Orleans.

Enrico Curuso was no doubt gracing the theatres with his opera.
Can you name some other talents in music in 1912?
Tarn Stephanos
 

Dave Gittins

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Mar 16, 2000
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My own field is serious music. In that area, things were in a state of revolution. World premieres of 1912 included Petrushka (bitonal)by Stravinsky and Pierrot Lunaire (atonal) by Schoenberg.

In Britain, the big name was Sir Edward Elgar, who had already written most of the works for which he is remembered. Ralph Vaughan Williams had written Fantasia on a Theme of Thomas Tallis and A Sea Symphony.

Debussy and Ravel were active in Europe and Richard Strauss was known for Elektra, Salome and Der Rosenkavalier. On the lighter side, Franz Lehar was writing popular operettas. Puccini was enjoying success and had most of his best work in regular performance.

Apart from Caruso, Dame Nellie Melba and John McCormack were very popular on both sides of the Atlantic. Dame Clara Butt, was famous in Britain and used to moonlight with Cunard as a foghorn.

The variety of styles of the period is great. It stretched from the very conservative to the radical and the outright weird. Music was forever changed in the space of less than five years.
 
Mar 20, 2000
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Popular singers in 1912 were Broadway's Nora Bayes ("By the Light of the Silvery Moon") and French revue star Gaby Deslys, who performed numerous naughty ditties and was the highest-paid vaudeville act.

Opera divas Mary Garden and Geraldine Farrar were big in 1912 as well. Also Lillian Nordica.
 
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You will find a lot more on this subject under the thread Popular Song and Dance 1912 which is under the Gilded Age TOPIC also- new posters, please check to see if a thread already exists before starting a duplication on the subject. Thanks!
 

Deborah Kogan

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Jan 29, 2003
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I am a Sophie Tucker fan, and her most famous (and theme)song was "Some of these days"..What surprised me was that the song was originally sung from the man's point of view. When I went to the Atlantic City Titanic Exhibit, there was sheet music that was brought up that had a man as the original singer of this song...
 
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Scott R. Andrews

Guest
One very popular form of musical entertainment on both sides of the Atlantic during this period was the organ recital. From the late Victorian era right on into the late 1920's, the secular use of the organ was popularized through the introduction of large pipe organs of Romantic or orchestral timber, which were installed in numerous town halls and civic auditoriums throughout the United States and the British Empire. Huge instruments such as those in Sydney's town hall, the Royal Albert Hall and the organ in Grand Court of Wanamaker's department store in Philadelphia are surviving examples of such instruments, though most such organs were of more modest size.

Typically, unlike most of the recitals heard today, programs of this period were based less on literature written specifically for the organ, but rather on transcriptions of popular orchestral, instrumental and operatic works. The compositions of Elgar, Dvorak, Debussy, Wagner, Liszt, Brahms, von Weber, Lehar, Offenbach and others were all popular subject matter.

To put this form of entertainment into historical perspective, this was an age prior to high fidelity sound reproduction, prior to broadcast radio and where the phonograph was still considered an expensive luxury. Also, for the most part only the largest cities had or could support a symphony orchestra or an opera.

While the smaller cities couldn't afford to support such facilities, many cities and larger towns did have the budget for a large civic hall or auditorium, many of which housed a large pipe organ. The more affluent towns even funded a permanent or part-time "municipal organist" to play for various functions and to provide weekly entertainment.

Recitals such as these, in addition to being very entertaining to the general public, also served a larger purpose. In the absence of recorded music or live symphonic performance, it was often only through the playing of transcriptions on a large pipe organ that many people living outside of large cities first heard and came to know pieces such as Sibelius' "Finlandia", Elgar's "Enigma Variations" or Wagner's "Ride of the Valkyries".

Scott Andrews
 
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Scott R. Andrews

Guest
I discovered an interesting aside to what I posted above regarding the popularity of organ recitals. Probably the best known organ performer internationally at that time was the English virtuoso Edwin H. Lemare. Knowing that he made frequent US tours prior to accepting a series of permanent posts here, I decided to take a look on the Ellis Island site to see what I could find on him in the passenger records. While the records are only available for arrivals, there were quite a few entries under his name, as well as entries a bit later on for his wife and son.

According to the passenger arrivals records, Mr. Lemare definitely preferred to travel aboard White Star liners. In all of the entries, only one Cunard ship appears - the Mauretania. One of his 1908 crossings was on the Oceanic. The remainder listed, spanning a period from 1904 to 1922 were all on "Big Four" ships. A number of his crossings on aboard the Baltic were with Capt. Smith, as was his 1907 crossing on the Adriatic, which also lists Dr. William F. N. O'Loughlin as the ship's surgeon.

Scott Andrews
 
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João Carlos Pereira Martins

Guest
Forgive my ridiculous questions, but does anybody know popular children songs of the beginning of the century or of 1912 in UK? I'm really needed!

Best, João
 
May 2, 2006
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Hi João,

Quite a lot of children's songs were nursery rhymes set to music at that time... so you could look at them. It also depends on what class of child you are talking about as to which songs they would have heard. Upper class children would have probably heard the same sort of songs as their parents in preparation for their future.

Carla
 
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João Carlos Pereira Martins

Guest
Carla, I was referring a child from a very wealthy aristocrat British family!

Thanks,

João
 
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This may take awhile to research, but right off the bat - nursery rhymes were known and adapted to simple tunes for children,(Ole King Cole, Ring a ring o' rosies, Twinkle Twinkle Little Star) as well as Sunday School hymn books, Christmas carols and camping songs. The Girls Guides and Boy Scouts were founding in the UK in 1908 and there were manuals of campfire tunes. Popular tunes from children's theatre productions learned with nanny on a happy matinee outing would be another catagory as well as pantomimes and the ever-popular operettas of Gilbert and Sullivan. Do you need specific titles? In America, a now-forgotten but then red-hot lady composer of the era was Mrs. Carrie Jacobs-Bond. Lady composers were far and few between and Carrie had some real blockbusters. To hear a few,including her 1912 children's hit, The Sandman, try this link Parlor Songs American Popular Music Collection June 2000 Featured Covers
 
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Forgot to add English Folksongs into the mix- Barbara Allen and Greensleeves being two which leap to mind. Rev. Baring-Gould (who had a rather exciting family) published a long-lasting collection of English folk songs for children in 1907 which was used in English schools for a long time. Wikpedia has more on the Rev. and his family
 
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Lynda Franklin

Guest
Carla, I was referring a child from a very wealthy aristocrat British family!


You know there are only so many children's songs out there what was known to the poor child was probably known to the child of means .(hehe)
Seriously though interesting topic alot of nice songs good simple entertainment now forgotten in today's techno age I loss to be mourned.
 
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João Carlos Pereira Martins

Guest
Thanks everyone, I'm very pleased! No Carla, I wasn't referring your family if you thought that! I was talking about a fictional family. Thanks for the info!!!

Best, João
 
May 2, 2006
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>No Carla, I wasn't referring your family if you thought that! I was talking about a fictional family<

I didn't say anything '-P

Besides, my family has never been what you would consider a 'very wealthy aristocrat British family'. For one there is German, Greek and Irish in the family blood and we have always been people with not as much money as the wealthy British families... so I think the music my family would have heard would probably have been drunk men singing in the pubs or similar things
happy.gif


Carla
 
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João Carlos Pereira Martins

Guest
Carla, no hard feelings. It was just a joke! I don't know your family, so I had no foundations to said that, only kidding. Then, I love UK and the British people more than the Portuguese one!

Thanks, João
 
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Lynda Franklin

Guest
My thanks to Shelley for providing the links to the songs listed .They may have been designed for children in mind ,but I have love em so I will try and pick up a few copies.
 
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Not only the lyrics and music- but the actual sheet music was so glorious! You will also love Melody Lane, Lynda. It features all the Titanic-related music as well and is certainly worth the one time $25 fee (Paypal accepted). The sheet music also looks divine framed as wall art too!
http://www.melodylane.net/
They don't write 'em like this anymore.
 
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Lynda Franklin

Guest
They don't write like this anymore is certainly true .Yeah I just adore the sheet music with the pictures are so lovely.If you have any more links to other sites please list below.My only problem is Paypal I don't have it and am a little nervous I had som problems in the past .
 

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