Porthole rims


david coon

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May 23, 2008
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I am preparing to do some full color scale drawings of the Titanic and some other liners. In looking for color information on the Titanic, I noticed that Ken Marschall's paintings seem to show that her porthole rims were painted to match her hull and superstructure, rather than being left in gleaming brass as I had always imagined. is this correct? And if so, was it a common practice on other liners? I'd be grateful for any help that anyone can give me on this question. Live Long and Prosper. David
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>I noticed that Ken Marschall's paintings seem to show that her porthole rims were painted to match her hull and superstructure, rather than being left in gleaming brass as I had always imagined. is this correct?<<

If the exterior photos I've seen are any indication, then the answer would be yes. In point of fact, I've rarely seen portholes on the hull of any ship which have been left as bare metal regardless of the material used. To leave something like that unpainted would be a nightmare to keep presentable because of the issues you have with tarnishing.

Portholes and frames for more conventional window arrangements on the superstructure would tend to be different but that's because they're accessible whether the ship is in port or out to sea.
 

david coon

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May 23, 2008
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Thank you for your quick response to my question. I must say you've saved me a lot of potential grief, like, if I HAD gone in and done all those bloody portholes in brass! I should now be able to do some pretty decent drawings of the Titanic and several other liners, so thank you again. Live Long and Prosper. David
 

Will C. White

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Apr 18, 2007
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David, there's also a practical consideration. Paint is a preservative, and saltwater is hell on brass. WILL
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>Paint is a preservative, and saltwater is hell on brass.<<

Not nearly as bad as it is on steel. Brass actually holds up quite well, although the tarnish can be unsightly. However, salt water can literally eat holes in steel.
 

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