Portholes


Jul 9, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
My own impression is that any such, stained glass, frosted, or otherwise, were used in cabins which faced out to decks that the public could get access to, the idea being to keep prying eyes from seeing anything they really ought not see. Wasn't such a window found in the Duff-Gordon's cabin by the last Cameron Expedition?
 
Feb 21, 2005
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I believe so Mike. I was thinking there were two windows side by side like that in the Duff-Gordon cabin, but I'd have to double check my tape before I said that with any promise.
 
D

Diego Uriol

Guest
Hello again!
While looking at some plans, I realized that many corridors connecting to a sidelight had in the end like a "locker" (it says L in the plans)

Could you tell me what does that mean?

locker.bmp


Best Regards,
Diego
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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On some plans 'L' stands for locker, on others for linen. In those areas, both would be right as they were used for storing bed linen.
 

Sduguay

Member
Apr 17, 2012
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Quebec, Canada
Hello,

I'm wondering how big these portholes were, and i've got this crazy idea that someone trapped in a third class cabin (such as the ones that are completely locked away in the bow) would be able to fit themselves through a porthole to escape.

Thanks!
S>D
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Mar 16, 2000
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Portholes in third class areas were 9" in diameter. Worse still, some had external bars to protect them from the anchor chains. People couldn't escape through them. There were some larger ports in other places. For details, see Titanic: The Ship Magnificent.

The need for larger portholes was seen in 1949 when Noronic was burned and passengers were seen trapped below. Steps were taken to fit larger ports in later ships.
 

Tim Gillane

Member
Oct 28, 2018
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Connecticut
What did the window's portholes on "B" Deck overlooking the bow and forward well deck look like?
Were they mullioned windows, or portholes covered with a decorative screen, or what?
 

Robert Arnone

Member
Mar 19, 2020
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Michigan
What did the window's portholes on "B" Deck overlooking the bow and forward well deck look like?
Were they mullioned windows, or portholes covered with a decorative screen, or what?

the square B deck windows forward on the bridge deck below the A deck promenade looking out to the well deck were square like most of the windows on B deck. The glass would’ve been quite plain. There was a screen on the inside I’m not sure what the screens looked like, but I would imagine they some sort of linen, and if I’m not mistaken they would have pulled up from the base of the window. Looking at a model of theTitanic there are two round windows in between the square windows those windows are actually part of doors leading out from the B deck corridor.
 

Kev Bell

Member
Jan 6, 2020
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Leigh Lancashire uk
I have a question regarding portholes that I'm trying to resolve and have no idea if it's even possible to do so. Basically I'm trying to find out which of the portholes were visibly brass rather than painted black or white. Hopefully someone can help
many thanks
 

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