Predictions


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Jul 12, 2003
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Not that I believe it but was there a Morgan Robertson who predicted the sinking of the Titanic 12 years before it happened? Anyone hear that before?

[Moderator's note: This thread was in another subtopic, but has been moved here. JDT]
 

Jason D. Tiller

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Hello Deborah,

Yes, Morgan Roberston did indeed write a book in 1898 called "Futility", which is about a ship called the Titan which hits an iceberg and sinks. While there are some similarities between it and the Titanic, there are a lot more differences. It's been way over rated as a predictor of the disaster.

For more discussion on this, there is a subtopic in "Titanic Books" that deals with Robertson's book.
 
Jun 11, 2000
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Jason's right. Robertson was obviously interested in this sort of thing, and extrapolated known information to form the basis of his book. e.g. ships were increasing in size, year on year; the profit on transatlantic runs; the problem of icebergs etc. And if you want to give a whopping great ship a name, then Titan or something similar seems fairly suitable.

Seems more like the creative power of the human mind, rather than its supernatural predictive power. Rather like, for example, writing a book now about the loss of a tourist space ship - which will most probably happen one day.

Still, at least he could have said "I told you so.", although I don't know if there is any record that he did.

Perhaps the book didn't sell well enough at the time to have any effect on those charged with designing and running ships?
 
Jul 12, 2003
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Thank you. I didn't realize there was a book. I had heard of the Titan and what happened to it but I never equated that to Robertson's prediction.
 
J

Jeffrey Beaudry

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As I go to church every weekend, I sometimes find the time to just flip through the booklet and read other readings. I came upon this one while doing so:

"While people are saying, "Peace and safety," destruction will come on them suddenly, as labor pains on a pregnant woman, and they will not escape." (1 Thessalonians 5:3)

It's probably just another situation like that of Nostradamus (in other words, it's vague enough that it could mean anything). I just liked the irony. What do you think?
 
Jan 16, 2006
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I agree with you, it could really fit any situation of mass destruction.

[Moderator's note: This post and the one above it, were in another thread outside of this subtopic, but have been moved here which is discussing the same subject. JDT]
 
Feb 24, 2004
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>>Still, at least he could have said "I told you so.", although I don't know if there is any record that he did.

He revised his book in 1912 after the Titanic sank. But some of his "new" specifications made his fictional Titan resemble the WSL ship even less.

Roy
 

Megan Markley

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William T. Stead did the same thing with the book From the Old World to the New. He claimed to be a spirtualist.
 
Jan 2, 2008
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I don't think of Robertson's or Stead's works as predictions, big ships had hit icebergs before, S.S Arizona is but one example, though she survived to sail another day. Ice was a nemesis to shipping long before Titanic, many ships that simply vanished were thought to have met their fate at the hands of a berg such as the Collins Line steamer Pacific in the 1850's. It was thought at the time she struck ice, however the remains of her hull were eventually found in the Irish Sea.
 
Jan 2, 2008
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The point I'm trying to make in my last post is such a disaster was very much a reality not a fiction that eventually came true. And the name Titan for his ship was just coincidence, size was conveyed in names of ships, Great Eastern's working title was Leviathan later used for the former Vaterland. Tonya
 
Jan 4, 2008
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Hello!! I'm new here. Since all the other girls at school don't talk about that. I got this from my boyfriend and I hope you can tell me alittle bit about it.
 
Feb 24, 2004
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Hi, Tonya!

>And the name Titan for his ship was just coincidence

Oh, do I ever agree! Does anyone think if Robertson had named his ship the "Lusitania," people today would be giving him a second thought? Or do they think if he had, the Lusy would have hit an iceberg instead of being torpedoed?

Coincidences are far more common than anyone getting lucky with a "prediction" of the future. I've met a number of people who claim (quite seriously) to be clairvoyant, but in reality they can't see into the middle of the next 15 minutes.

Roy
 
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