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Laura Melinda Varjo

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Hey, I have a project in my History class, and, this is my topic-The Impact of the Titanic Disaster on the United States. So, I need some primary sources about the ship,like a song, newspaper... where can I find all this ?

Thanks, Laura
 
Jun 11, 2000
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In this General Titanica section, Laura, go to the 1912 newspaper reports folder and to the hit songs etc. of 1912 folder, and be sure to follow the other relevant ET links thread, which will take you to other site areas. You may also find relevant information in the Aftermath section on the main Topics menu.
 
Feb 24, 2004
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Hi, Laura!

If you live in or near a large city library, you may find they have a collection of old newspapers on microfilm. Browsing through these can be fascinating! :)

If you'd like to check on how Titanic was reported in a city farther away, you can request their microfilms through interlibrary loan. A good practice is to ask for two months worth at the same time -- say, April and May 1912. It may take a little while for them to arrive, but you'll learn so much from them, and not only about Titanic.

Best wishes!

Roy
 
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Laura Melinda Varjo

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Yes Monica, I'm well aware of the fact this is General Titanica. I didn't have much time looking for where to post, so I thought about this place. But thanks for setting me straight and for the sites to visit.

Oh cool, wait, you mean microfilm, and you have to look into this machine, like in a microscope, is that what you mean ? The library has them, but I always wondered what they were used for.(I rarely go to the library) If I'm talking about the right stuff, then cool, this might be very helpful for my project.

Thank you,

Laura
 
Jun 11, 2000
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I wasn't issuing any kind of reproof at all, Laura. I just didn't want to send you galloping all over the board looking for those two threads everywhere else, when they were so close by.
 
May 1, 2004
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Laura,

I enthusiastically endorse Roy's suggestion about reading the newspaper accounts on microfilm. Just be careful to look away from the machine every ten minutes and rest your eyes for a few minutes. I got so engrossed in reading the accounts in the Toronto Daily Star that I spent 4 hours and could not go in to work next day - headache from eyestrain.

If the papers you read are like the Star, you'll see a lot of 'local interest' accounts. Not just about relatives of some importance, like Mrs. Peuchen, whose husband was a major and the president of a chemical company, worried about her husband's safety, but about someone whose cousin was steward on the ship or who's sister was emigrating to Canada. Homely little stories that made the tragedy so poignant to me. The feeling of 'this happened today' too. Taking Mrs. P. as an example, did she pore over those very same articles for news? Was she besieged by reporters scribbling down her stunned reactions? And her neighbours along Jarvis Street: were they snatching the papers from the newsvendors' hands?

Another thing that got me: The original newspaper that was scanned for microfilming must have been read almost to bits because the lower sections were frayed and torn and illegible. None of the Daily Star's before the date the sinking was 'news' look so tattered.

When you talk about Titanic's impact: do you mean immediate impact? [What happened when the news broke?] or impact when it 'sank in' [e.g. Senator Smith calling for an immediate investigation?] or long term impact [the 'patrolling' of icebergs] or its impact today [the movies and books and societies and editorial cartoons that use Titanic as a metaphor for disaster]

Steven Biel's book "Down with the Old Canoe" might lead you to some useful sources.
Paul Heyer's "Titanic Legacy: disaster as media event and myth" may also be useful.

Titanic (Steamship) is the Library of Congress subject heading
Also see Shipwrecks - North Atlantic Ocean

Have fun at the library and don't forget to give the reference librarian a mental workout by asking lots of questions "Where do I find...?"

Marilyn P.
 
Feb 24, 2004
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"Just be careful to look away from the machine every ten minutes and rest your eyes for a few minutes. I got so engrossed in reading the accounts in the Toronto Daily Star that I spent 4 hours and could not go in to work next day - headache from eyestrain."

Oh, yes, yes, indeed, Marilyn. I know from whence you speak!

Yes, Laura, take heed and take breaks ! Your eyes, your neck and your back will thank you! '-)

Best wishes!

Roy
 
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Laura Melinda Varjo

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Oh ok, thanks for the warnings, I have a perfect eye vision 20/20, I'll be careful not to mess it up. I couldn't stay there reading for more than 10 minutes anyways, try to get over the project as soon as possible, plus my best friend's coming down from NH to visit, and I don't wanna do work when she's here, it's just a once a year opportunity I get to see her.

Monica, I'm sorry to snap at you like that. Thank you for being nice and for your kindness.

Marilyn, I kinda meant both-both kinds of impacts, what you said. Right after the sinking, and for the later years to come, have enough lifeboats ready for everyone onboard...all that. Thanks for the suggestions of the books,I'll check on them.

Thank you all for your helping me out, and Monica, again, I'm sorry.

Laura
 
Jun 11, 2000
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Don't worry about it, Laura. No bother at all.
May I just say, as a college teacher, I don't think 10 minutes will do it! Marilyn and Roy are talking ten hours here, minimum....
I don't know what the guideline hours or wordcount is for your project, but your title is rather broad. You might do better focusing on a small part of the impact on the US. For example, nothing to do with individuals or families, which are not really 'the US', but on issues affecting the whole country in some way. I don't think there are any of staggering nationwide effect actually, although others may disagree, but there is the establishment of the International Ice Patrol, and there is the Marconi insider-dealing share scandal and its aftermath. Enjoy your weekend with your friend.
 
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Laura Melinda Varjo

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You're a teacher ? Oh my gosh, I'm REALLY sorry Ms. Hall. Boy, if I'd spoken like that to my teachers, (with that attitude)I would have gotten a slap across my face and a good deal of In School Suspension. I'm always polite with grownups(yeah it shows),I don't even know what I thought of you. If I were one of your students, and you knew I were, but I didn't know it was you, would you have failed me, or be mean to me, like on my essay, say I'd really earned a 90%, but you would have gave me a 80%? O-o, I'd better watch out, what if MY teachers are here too. Well, that's why I've misspelled my last name on purpose.

About the topic, ok, I'll do so,(focus on the smaller impacts of the disaster affecting this nation. ) Thank you for all your help,

Laura
 

Bob Godfrey

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These days, Laura, if a teacher slaps a student it's the teacher who gets the suspension! I'm a teacher too, by the way, but you don't have to call me Sir.
smile.gif
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Jason D. Tiller

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I will also happily endorse Roy's suggestion of searching for information on microfilm. It's well worth the trip and they are so interesting to read, as Roy said.

I've spent countless hours going through microfilm, most recently this afternoon for a couple of hours. I also agree with Marilyn's and Roy's suggestion of taking breaks in between, it definitely does help.

All the best with your project, Laura.
 
Jun 11, 2000
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quote:

I'm a teacher too, by the way, but you don't have to call me Sir. .
I always do!
Seriously, Laura, you can call me Monica - all my students do, though they are over 18, it's true. On the subject of a smaller focus, there is an article on the site about the legal effects of the Titanic, written by a college student, which might help you. Don't forget to ask the author if you intend to rely on, or quote heavily, from it. Her name is Allison Lane, and she is a member here.
https://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/item.php/3620.html
 
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Laura Melinda Varjo

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Ok, I'm gonna start my project today (just collecting info).

I know Bob, but in my old school, my music teacher used to pull our ears (hard) if we sang a re instead of a mi...so I always kinda wished he'd pull it so hard that it got messed up, and I couldn't hear, so my parents will go after him.

Monica, I will most certainly check that site out. Thanks everyone for helping me out, you too Jason.

Laura
 

Inger Sheil

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Feb 9, 1999
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quote:

Oh, yes, yes, indeed, Marilyn. I know from whence you speak!

Yes, Laura, take heed and take breaks ! Your eyes, your neck and your back will thank you!
Ah yes...that very, very special feeling one gets in the skull after a few hours of reading old type on microfilm. It is a distinct, and recognisable type of headache...particularly when the machine is a bit wonky, or the MF isn't the best quality, and you're constantly adjusting the focus and needing to reposition the frames. Feeding the rolls through...manual or machine advancement...sods who don't rewind the film correctly...columns of dense, small type, often unrelieved by headlines (depending on period and origin of the newspaper)...wince. And then there's the expense of the copies if you're doing large batches, unless you want to transcribe by hand or onto a laptop.

Well worth it, though. There are riches in there waiting to be uncovered. Just don't get too distracted by all the other interesting subjects that jump out at you when you're looking for something in particular!​
 
Jan 22, 2001
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Laura,

Have you seen he book "Titanic Extra"?

It consists of the front pages of newspapers from many different locations in the U.S. from the day the ship sailed through the inquiries.

Seeing the whole pages clearly as they looked to the readers of the time is much more enjoyable than seeing them on microfilm.
 
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Laura Melinda Varjo

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Alright Inger, I'll keep that in mind. Thanks. Wow, a lot of you guys insist looking in these microfilm machines (for a long time) is such a pain, I'll be careful not to blind myself. Now I feel sorry for my mom, she has to work with microscopes, electronmicroscopes like all day how must be she feeling ? Ouch!

Monica, that site is great, thanks. I've printed it in school, and it is a great help.

No, I've never even heard about that book. I'll check it out. Thank you. Yeah, but I'm sure microfilms are good too, I mean not every subject in history has a book written about it, and I guess microfilms come in handy.

Laura
 
Feb 24, 2004
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Hi, Monica!

>"May I just say, as a college teacher, I don't think 10 minutes will do it! Marilyn and Roy are talking ten hours here, minimum...."

Ah, if I only had such patience...

On Seattle Public's old viewers, 20 minutes was about tops for me. Their new ones, which are digital, are much easier on the eyes.

I'll keep you posted on when I'm nearing the 10 hour mark! (Chances are, though, they'll have kicked me out long before that ever happens!)

Best wishes!

Roy
 
Jan 22, 2001
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Laura,

There is another similar book called New York Extra which you may be able to find. It has only one page on Titanic, but a really good one, from the new York Tribune of November 27, 1910. the headline reads "How Can We Dock This Marine Monster When She Reaches the Port of New York?"

It shows a full page cross section of Titanic, and compares her size to Henry Hudson's ship, the Half Moon, and Robert Fulton's Clermont. Titanic was more than 36 times larger than the Half Moon and 28 times larger than the Clermont.
 
Feb 24, 2004
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>"Wow, a lot of you guys insist looking in these microfilm machines (for a long time) is such a pain, I'll be careful not to blind myself."

Awwww, Laura!... It isn't that bad...really!

Just keep in mind that a certain amount of fatigue, whether eye or neck, can be a factor. If the payback weren't so great, I wouldn't recommend it.

I still read my Titanic books, but I'm finding I get so much more fantastic information from all those old newspapers. And even when some reporter's really messed up a story, at least it hasn't been filtered through 90 years of someone else's "interpretative agenda."

Roy
 
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