Queen Elizabeth Maiden Voyage 3740 Unpublished Photo

Sep 2, 2009
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Hello all:

To quote directly from "The Elizabeth" by Niel Potter and Jack Frost, George G. Harrap & Co. Ltd, High Holborn, London, W.C.I., 1965 page 60:

"She was first spotted forty miles east of Fire Island, in New York Bay, by the crew of a commercial airliner, still zigzagging, although she was in neutral waters.

Observers reported that many of her stairways were unpainted, that there were black rust spots everywhere, were paint had peeled off, that only four men were seen on the bridge and two civilians at the stern. She was carrying water ballast, but was riding high out of the water. Several lifeboat davits were empty, as she carried only enough lifeboats for a crew of four hundred; her name was painted over in grey, only the block letters being visible.

She passed Ambrose light at seventeen minutes past nine in the morning, and veteran pilot Captain Seeth, of Long Island, brought her through the Ambrose Channel. He hadn't been specially chosen: it just happened it was his next call in the pilots' rota.

As as the great liner passed "quarantine" the first ship to great here was the sludge vessel, "Coney Island". Her Skipper, Captain Charles Macleary, blew her three long welcoming blasts on his whistle, and received and immediate reply." <end>

This must have been an impressive sight to see the world's largest and newest liner unfinished, painted in grey, arriving unexpectedly in New York Harbor on the Morning of March 7, 1940.

There are a few photographs of her, taken as she was coming up the Hudson river, that many of the liner buffs will have seen.

But here is a true piece of history I have added to my personnel collection it is a 3" by 4" snapshot taken by a crew member of the "Coney Island" showing this moment in history.

This item was hidden in a shoe box for over sixty years and was sold to me as part of the liquidation of an estate with numerous other ocean liner photographs.

Please look at the photo closely, you will see the pilot boat to the right, the painted windows and missing lifeboats, and her battered waterline from the paint washing off on this mad dash across the sea. But best of all look at her first funnel she is returning the welcoming salute of the "Coney Island"

If you think this photo is great you should see the other, and the Morro Castle once's

(An unpublished treat for the members of the ET Board) S. Anderson Collection C. 2002

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A

Alex McLean

Guest
Nice photos, Steven. QE has always been one of my favourites.
 
Apr 23, 2002
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I have never much been keen on the QE's profile.
I think is the superstructure under the bridge im not keen on, too bulky looking.
I dont think her design was anything attractive - however maybe im wrong!
 

Matthew Lips

Member
Mar 8, 2001
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There are no rights or wrongs here, Greg - it is all a matter of taste!

Personally, I found the Queen Elizabeth sleeker and generally more attractive than the Queen Mary, which I think has a slightly stodgy appearance - but again that is just an opinion.

Thanks for the great pics, BTW.
 
Sep 2, 2009
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Matthew:

I would have to agree with you I to find the Queen Elizabeth, sleeker then the Queen Mary. However, you also need to look at her in Cunard livery.

Not as shown above in her unfinished state, with windows painted grey or not even cut out as if yet, and in a dull war grey, without all her lifeboats.

However, I didn't like Queen Elizabeth in her livery as the SEAWISE UNIVERSITY she just didn't look good in all white in my opinion.
 

Matthew Lips

Member
Mar 8, 2001
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Steven, I agree. But even half completed or painted white, Queen Elizabeth couldn't hide her sleek appearance. I would consider her a greyhound, while Queen Mary was (is) maybe more of a bulldog type. If you get my meaning.

At least one of them is still around to remind us of glory days gone by. I would prefer it to be QE, but let's be grateful for what we can get!
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Out of interest, from what I remember the QE did not hold the Blue Ribband. I know the United States took it in the early 1950s, but there were several good years of peacetime service before that to make an attempt. Although rationing was still around, surely Britain had recovered somewhat by 1950 -- or was the fuel cost the consideration?

Best regards,

Mark.
 
May 12, 2002
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Hi Mark,

As I understand it, QE had more than enough oomph to take the Blue Ribband from QM. But Cunard, probably wisely, wanted to have two record breaking ships: "The World's Biggest" *and* "The World's Fastest".

Cheers

Paul
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Hi Paul,

Thanks for that answer. I hope to get more read up on the QE. My late grandfather was on her during the war.

Out of interest, though, did she ever get close to the Blue Ribband speed? Or were any day's runs faster than her elder sister's? I know that her propulsion plant was improved, as I saw some records in Liverpool -- just wish I'd paid more attention!

Best regards,

Mark.
 
Sep 2, 2009
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Mark:

Let me check my various sources on the Queen Elizabeth. Since I have Potter and Frost, Winchester and several of the more modern histories to see if they have any statistic's on here speed.

Now I just need to find the books so to say
 
Sep 2, 2009
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Mark:

In reviewing my sources:

I looked to "RMS QUEEN ELIZABETH - From Victory to Valhalla by David F. Hutchings, Kingfisher Publications 65A The Avenue, Southampton SO1 2TA, 1990 ISBN: 0 946184 55 0

Sir Percey Bates, the Chairman of Cunard White Stat Line's is quoted as saying to Commodore James Bisset, during a tour of the ship prior to her voyage from Southampton on October 6, 1946 the following:

"We do not expect you to attempt to make speed records either on the trials or on the Maiden Voyage. The Queen Mary still holds the Blue Riband with her eastbound crossing in 1938 at 31.69 knots, and that is good enough! We shall be satisfied with crossings in four and a half days, more or less, according to the weather, at average speeds of from 27 to 29 knots, without driving the ships at their utmost speeds...."

David Hutchings adds:

"For the two "Queens" to race against one another would not only make commercial nonsense but it would also be a waste of fuel."

Source page 51 "RMS Queen Elizabeth Victory to Valhalla.

On October 7, 1946 Sir James Bisset, took a test run over the measured mile course and determined that the ship could achieve "Over 30 knots with out straining"

On October 8, 1946 Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth, boarded the liner for the official measured mile speed trial. At 3:00 the speed trial began and on the northward run she covered the mile in 2 minutes, 1.3 seconds at a speed of 29.71 Knots, the next marker was reached in two minutes 1.0 seconds at 29.75knots. After the liner completed her turn for the second leg of the test it was reported that the sun was so bright on the marker that the test could not be measured correctly so it wasn't taken.

Source: Queen Elizabeth: Victory to Valhalla page 53

The Queen Elizabeth's Maiden voyage in October, 1946.

4 days 16 hours 18 minutes, or 27.99 knots

However, she crossed in stormy conditions, and slowed to only ten knots as she approached the New England Coast.
 
Sep 2, 2009
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To add to this thread on the Queen Elizabeth, her is another item from my personnel collection of Ocean Liner Memoribalia.

A Dock Stand launch ticket for the launch of Hull S.S. No. 552 (Queen Elizabeth) on September 27, 1938

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Jan 5, 2001
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Thanks Steven for sharing your sources. It is very interesting material indeed.

I can well believe that the big QE could do more than thirty knots without strain, although to be honest I was expecting a slightly higher speed. I was under the impression that the QM had done almost 33 knots on her trials, but I might be mistaken.

I'll have to get that book -- I'm also getting Janette McCutcheon's QE work, by Tempus at £16.99.

Many thanks again for your time Steven, it's appreciated.

Best regards,

Mark.
 
Sep 2, 2009
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Mark:

As For Janette McCutcheon's book I the Queen Elizabeth I need to get a copy of it also, I have read through a fiends copy quickly.

I have Janette's e-mail address somewhere in the collection as I purchased several postcards that she and her husband were selling from their collection off e-bay a few years back.

I also purchased from her copies of her books on the Queen Mary and the Mauretania which are both excellent works also.
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Hi Steven,

Yes, I understand Janette has an excellent postcard collection. It seems we have acquaintences in common, for Janette's husband Campbell is my book editor. I hope to buy her other works, but I'm waiting until I'm entitled to a discount.
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Best regards,

Mark.