Queen Mary 2 Elegant liner or floating apartments


Apr 23, 2002
545
0
171
Am I the only person who thinks the QM2 is one ugly looking ship?

I think the designers could have came up with a much more elegant looking liner
 

Jerry Nuovo

Member
Jan 22, 2010
700
2
71
New Jersey,USA
I do not think the QM2 is an ugly looking ship.I understand that Cunard needs to have verandas built on to their new ships if Cunard is going to be able to compete with the other cruise lines. Sincerely,Jerry Nuovo
 

Jason D. Tiller

Moderator
Member
Dec 3, 2000
8,243
25
308
Niagara Falls, Ontario
I also don't think the Queen Mary 2 is ugly at all. She's a beautiful looking ship and I'm looking forward to being aboard her in April.

Best regards,

Jason
happy.gif
 
Jul 11, 2001
547
6
171
Ugly? Naw! The bow could have been longer to give it better porportions in my opinion, but thats about it. Oh! and why only one funnel? Sheesh! Even the Disney Cruise ships have a fake second funnel. Nonetheless, I am going to book a trip after the fanfare dies down.

David
 

Jeremy Lee

Member
Jun 12, 2003
1,374
10
161
Wouldn't it look odd for a ship to have two or more funnels in that kind of shape?

The only thing I dislike is the bridge front, which seems too big for the rest of the ship.

Overall, QM2 is still better than most 'floating apartment' cruise ships.
 
Dec 2, 2000
58,614
693
483
Easley South Carolina
>>Am I the only person who thinks the QM2 is one ugly looking ship?<<

I doubt it. A matter of perspective and taste though, is it not?

>>I think the designers could have came up with a much more elegant looking liner<<

Maybe, but would it have appealed to the market that exists and is anticipated? As expensive as any ship is to build, the owners who buy them take a good hard look at the markets they intend to serve and do everything they can to build what the customers expect and demand. As economics drives everything, they really don't have much choice in the matter.
 
May 12, 2002
211
1
171
As Michael said, it's a matter of taste. I think she's not at all bad, although there's one or two angles that don't flatter her (I guess the same can be said of many ships though). She's probably about the best she can be given the economic realities. One thing I will say though, I saw her as she arrived in Southampton and she's definitely very graceful when underway.

Cheers

Paul
 

Jeremy Lee

Member
Jun 12, 2003
1,374
10
161
If Cunard want to remain a traditional line, they should retain the classic liner design instead of piling the decks high up as in the modern cruise ships and even QM2.
 
May 12, 2002
211
1
171
Cunard haven't really been a traditional line since the end of the year round transatlantic express. Things evolve. What do you consider to be classic design anyway? Britannia, Umbria, Mauretanica, Queen Mary, QE2? They've all been pretty different, and all designed to meet the economic realities of their time. I'm just glad that Cunard are still around in a form that treats us to the sight of a new ship every now and then (okay, 35 years!).

Cheers

Paul
 

Jeremy Lee

Member
Jun 12, 2003
1,374
10
161
QE2 is still considered 'classic', but new ships have virtually no stern (all cabins) and have decks piled up real high. (Look at Carnival)

BTW, Britannia and Umbria are too exaggerated, but Mauretania would be fine for ocean liner enthus like you and me, but not on a regular or round-the-world cruising service.
smile.gif
 
May 12, 2002
211
1
171
> Britannia and Umbria are too exaggerated

wink.gif
Just making a point!

I guess someone's definition of classic is about as subjective as their definition of ugly or beautiful. QM2 has a fair-sized stern area, and, to my eye, Cunard have struck a good balance between a QE2-like profile and many decks.

Cheers

Paul
 
Jul 11, 2001
547
6
171
In my opinion, the LAST "Classic Liners" were the multi stackers. The first Queen Elizabeth, the Normandi, the Queen Mary and the S.S.United States. The QE2 is a late sixties design and not one of my favorites. The "Olympic Class" ships with their 4 funnels are still my all-time favorites. I agree with Jeremy that 99% of todays "Cruise Ships" are floating apartment building and are not elegant at all. In fact, I will not call them "Liners" as they are just "Cruise Ships" to me. A Liner to me is a TransAtlantic ship, a Cruise ship is only good for Island hopping.

David
 
Dec 2, 2000
58,614
693
483
Easley South Carolina
>>If Cunard want to remain a traditional line, they should retain the classic liner design instead of piling the decks high up as in the modern cruise ships and even QM2.<<

Why would they want to remain a "traditional line" if tradition doesn't sell cabins? No matter. I'm sure a century from now, the QM2 will look positively conservative compared to whatever will be out there.
 

Eric Sauder

Member
Nov 12, 2000
403
14
171
Michael wrote: "Why would they want to remain a "traditional line" if tradition doesn't sell cabins?"

I'm not sure why people assume that traditional doesn't sell cabins. Isn't QE2 doing exceptionally well? People clammer to sail on her because of what she is. The Norway was as popular as ever until the boiler explosion. Regal Empress is a traditional ship which I understand is doing well. There are many others also.

The old Rotterdam V was almost always fully booked for whatever voyages she made, so great was her popularity. The reason Holland America got rid of her is that she was clearing "only" $20 million per year net profit. The accountants said it wasn't enough. The marketing department was clueless about how she fit into the grand scheme of things. So off she went, sold to another line and still did quite well.

What the bean counters don't understand is that there is a market for traditional ships, and I don't know why they just don't see that.

Eric Sauder
 
Dec 2, 2000
58,614
693
483
Easley South Carolina
>>What the bean counters don't understand is that there is a market for traditional ships, and I don't know why they just don't see that.<<

Perhaps....and Perhaps both the Norway and the QE2 enjoyed the success that they did because they were just right for the existing market. Unless I see the market studies and the actual observed trends, I'm afraid I can only guess on this.
 

Jerry Nuovo

Member
Jan 22, 2010
700
2
71
New Jersey,USA
When Royal Caribbean Cruise Line and Celebrity Cruise Line have new ships with verandas,How could Cunard compete with the above mentioned cruise lines with just the QE2 which she has only about several verandas and these verandas are part of the luxury suites costing for a 6 day crossing or cruise over $10,000.Only the super rich could afford these QE2 suites.Royal Caribbean,Celebrity and other cruise lines have built new ships that have verandas connected to cabins that are priced so that middle-class people could afford them.And that is why you see verandas built on to the QM2 so that Cunard could also market the QM2 to middle-class people.I personally don't need or want a veranda connected to my cabin when I go on a cruise,For me a inside cabin is just fine,thank you.But the majority of passengers do want a veranda connected to their cabins.And that does not mean that the QE2's sailing days are over.I do believe that the QE2 will go on sailing for another several years maybe more because there is a market out there of passengers who do want to take a cruise on a classic ship which the QE2 has become a classic.Another example is the Regal Empress.The Regal Empress is a 51 year old ocean liner and she is doing fine.And the Regal Empress is 16 years older than the QE2. Sincerely,Jerry Nuovo
 
D

Doug McDonnell

Guest
What I think people need to realize is that Cunard Line is a traditional line in a sense that it still provides great service, larger cabins and trans atlantic. Cunard no longer caters to average people. The people who go on a cunard cruise are wealthy millionaires or ocean liner "buffs" who go for the experience. Cunard has sarted to loss some of its millionaire clientel because the cannot compete. Most people would not pay 10,000$ to go on a small ship with few things to do and a room with a small t.v. and small windows. The only way to keep this bussiness is by building a ship like the QM2 that has balconies, bars, pools, reastaurants and theatres. While at the same time that the interiors and quality of the ship are still fitting for ocean liner "buffs"
 

Similar threads

Similar threads