Queen Mary 2 versus freak wave


Tico Sloot

Member
Feb 15, 2006
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Hello everyone,

I am new to this board. I have read alot of the threads and find these very informative.

I am planning a transatlantic journey from Southampton to New York on the QM2. Being me, I always inventarise all possible risks.

This is what brings me to freak waves. Can anyone tell me what would happen if a freak wave broke on QM2? Or what would happen if she got herself in some terrible weather?

I appreciate the responses.

Here is a pic of a Cruise Ship being hit by a freak wave. Don't know if the pic is real.

http://web.usna.navy.mil/~phmiller/en358/cruise%20ship%20big%20wave.JPG

http://www.strangecosmos.com/images/content/102022.jpg
 
S

Scott R. Andrews

Guest
Tico,

Those pictures are real, and what's worse, those aren't "freak waves". Those pictures are of one of Carnival Cruise Line's ships, Carnival Triumph, plunging into the trough of a heavy swell as it fled westward in advance of hurricane Isabel. The ship was supposed to do the eastern Caribbean route, but was instead diverted to Jamaica and Cozumel.

Regards,
Scott Andrews
 

Jim Kalafus

Member
Dec 3, 2000
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>Can anyone tell me what would happen if a freak wave broke on QM2? Or what would happen if she got herself in some terrible weather?

It's an interesting question. You may have seen the photos of what happened to the Michelangelo when she was struck by a rogue wave early on in her career. If you haven't- two of them- one of the wave approaching and one of the immediate aftermath are available in Bill Miller's Italian Line history- basically, the forward part of her superstructure collapsed, or was pushed backwards, and the occupants of one of the first class cabins washed overboard and lost. One might then wonder what would happen to the new breed of balconied liners if it was broadsided by such a wave, or caught in a large storm. The Morro Castle, for instance, got caught in a September 1933 storm that managed to smash out enough portholes to flood everything below B deck to a depth of "shin deep" and give her a pronounced list to port, and you wonder what provisions have been made to strengthen the large expanses of glass that now make up the sides of passenger ships.

There was a disastrous crossing by the Rex in 1937, in which the passengers refused to obey the "stay put" orders as he ship rolled severely and the end result was that there were a surprising number of injuries among people who tried to negotiate staircases and failed, or got thrown into furniture or vice versa- and there was also a death. People often do not respect things like the weather until it is too late to alter the end results of their own carelessness, and we've spoken amongst ourselves about the first time one of the balconied ships gets caught up in a major storm and passengers decide to storm watch from their own terraces~ the option of locking the doors to the outside decks in the public areas is no longer an option, and one wonders what provisions are in place to protect deluxe cabin passengers from their own impulses in that case.

Having said that, we were aboard the QM2 in her first ever large storm and she did handle well. We did not have the ability to measure the waves, but the highest of them were, to judge by our video of the event, one deck higher than the upper level of the dining room. QM2 has a certain advantage in that most of her 'vulnerable' cabins are further above the waterline than the reach of all but Poseidon-caliber waves. She was considerably steadier in the weather than was the traditionally designed Norway ex France which handled worse in lesser seas, so from my POV she might be a bit stocky- even ungainly- looking, but is a safe bet to travel through a storm aboard.

>This Dubya-speak seems to be catching...

So, too, does gratuitous rudeness towards people for whom English may not be the primary language.
 

Noel F. Jones

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May 14, 2002
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"So, too, does gratuitous rudeness towards people for whom English may not be the primary language."

Since I have seen no evidence of it I'll leave that to your judgement Jim. In the present case and on the evidence of the construction and content of his post I shouldn't think for a moment that Tico Sloot has any need of your championing.

Noel
 

Mark Baber

Moderator
Member
Dec 29, 2000
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Gentlemen, the comment was rude regardless of the native language of the original poster, especially since (as a Google search will reveal) use of "inventarise" (which apparently doesn't appear in the dictionary) as a verb apparently meaning "catalog" or "inventory" seems to be gaining some currency, for better or worse. Moreover, the unstated political commentary expressed by the term "Dubya-speak" (which is also not in the dictionary) is inappropriate for this board.
 

Joe Russo

Member
Apr 10, 2006
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Yikes! Is this common for a ship's forecastle to dip beneath the waves or is this rare when ships are in hurricane conditions? Does anyone know if passengers were on board this Carnival ship when the photo was taken? If so, does maritime law intervene in situations like these and are passengers required to adhere to requests such as staying inside? Also, would glass balcony doors be secured and locked in weather like this especially on the QM2's "hull" balconies on the lower decks?
 

Noel F. Jones

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May 14, 2002
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Mark, reluctant as I am to protract the matter, purely in the interests of pedantry the correct spelling of the word apropos inventories is "inventorise" and it is dictionaried as such; however, as an extension of the verb "to invent" it is unorthodox (inventive even). In the context I took the word to have been intended in the latter sense.

I promise to eschew pejorative political colloquialisms from hereon...

Noel
 

Mark Baber

Moderator
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Dec 29, 2000
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reluctant as I am to protract the matter

I agree with what you say here, Noel, but "inventarise" in the sense that I described, and as I understood the original message to use it, seems to be gaining some currency, as I mentioned.

I promise to eschew pejorative political colloquialisms

Thank you.
 

Joe Russo

Member
Apr 10, 2006
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So are we still on the subject here or has this turned into an English language chat room? ;)
Anyone care to talk about the QM2 and that wave?
 
J

Jeannine Kleinschmidt

Guest
I don't know if this was posted on this site before--I couldn't locate it anyway--but has anyone heard of a recent incident with the QM2 down in the Caribbean? That's all I heard, I would just like to know the details.

Cheers!
Jeannine
 

Ryan Thompson

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Dec 6, 2005
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It's an interesting question. You may have seen the photos of what happened to the Michelangelo when she was struck by a rogue wave early on in her career. If you haven't- two of them- one of the wave approaching and one of the immediate aftermath are available in Bill Miller's Italian Line history- basically, the forward part of her superstructure collapsed, or was pushed backwards, and the occupants of one of the first class cabins washed overboard and lost.

Jim - Are those pictures online anywhere?
 

Ryan Thompson

Member
Dec 6, 2005
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Yikes!! Are the first two photos of the actual damage-causing wave starting to break?

Two passengers, of which cabins were in the part struck by the wave, were killed immediately. One crewmember died few hours later and more than fifty people were injured, ten of them gravely.

I thought the two passengers were swept overboard?? According to Wikipedia they were:

In April 1966 Michelangelo was hit by an unusually large wave during a storm in the mid-Atlantic, which caused the forward part of her superstructure to collapse, or was pushed backwards, and swept two passengers into the sea. One crew member died a few hours later

I added a link in the wikipedia article to the michelangel-raffaelo.com site.
 
Dec 2, 2000
58,609
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Easley South Carolina
>>Yikes!! Are the first two photos of the actual damage-causing wave starting to break?<<

The website which was linked to presents it as such. If that wave wasn't the one, it seems a good bet that the one which did had to be larger.
 

Russell Smith

Member
Jun 18, 2009
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quote:

This is what brings me to freak waves. Can anyone tell me what would happen if a freak wave broke on QM2? Or what would happen if she got herself in some terrible weather?

From what I've read, the QM2 is a pretty stable ship in rough weather. As for the freak wave possibility, I guess anything is possible, but I wouldn't be concerned.
 

Ryan Thompson

Member
Dec 6, 2005
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After earlier wave incidents it seems like thicker metal for the outer sides of the superstructure would be standard for cruise (and other) ships.
 

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