Queen Mary 2 versus freak wave


Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>After earlier wave incidents it seems like thicker metal for the outer sides of the superstructure would be standard for cruise (and other) ships.<<

Don't count on it. Steel is heavy and the higher up you get, the less weight you want to have there. The alternative is to accept topweight and all the baggage which comes with the deal. This approach may have some merit with ships designed as liners but cruise ships typically operate in balmier climates where freak waves are seldom an issue. Even when it is, the ships keep very close tabs on the weather so they can stay out of trouble by making sure that they are not where the trouble is.
 

Russell Smith

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Jun 18, 2009
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And being a Liner designed for the perils of the North Atlantic, I'd rather be on the QM2 than a Cruiser during bad weather.
 

Ryan Thompson

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Dec 6, 2005
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Don't count on it. Steel is heavy and the higher up you get, the less weight you want to have there.

Is that why lighter aluminum was used with the Michelangelo?
 

Carmine

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Oct 16, 2013
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Hi! I am Carmine, a new member. I have been studying the Titanic nearly 50 years. I am SURE there are people out there that know more them I, however, I do consider myself very well versed about the Titanic. The QUEEN MARY you ask. Did you see the movie 'THE PERFICT STORM'? In 1978 my cousin Cosmo Marcantonio, (you can find the story on the net using his name) was in the SAME EXECT type of storm. His Gloucester Massachusetts departure was the same port as the perfect storm ship departed. My cousin's sinking was two sinking’s after the Perfect Storm ship. He was the owner and caption of his ship. All was lost. WHAT DOES THIS HAVE TO DO WITH YOUR QUESTION? I am sorry for the long introduction. In my Cousin’s perfect storm the Queen Mary was badly damaged. I have been on several cruses. The chances of a ‘NORMAL’ size ship (height) sinking are VERY low. The ship would have to be pushed over by the wind and waves. Not common at all for large ships. HOWEVER, there is a BIG CAUTION to be noted. I do not know much about ship building. BUT experts who do ARE cautioning THAT THE NEW SHIPS ARE TOO TALL and can capsize much easier than regular large ships. On the net, type ‘are tall ships dangerous’. Or some content like that. Even if I could afford it, I would not go on a ship as tall as they once were wide. Stay well and have a blessed day. You may email me if you wish. Carmine
 

Mark Baber

Moderator
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Dec 29, 2000
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In 1978 my cousin Cosmo Marcantonio ... was in the SAME EXECT type of storm. .... In my Cousin’s perfect storm the Queen Mary was badly damaged.
Carmine, the original QM went out of service in 1967 and QMII didn't come on the scene until 2004. Neither of them was around in 1978.
 

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