Quote from The Night Lives On Who said it


Neil McRae

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Apr 16, 2001
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At the start of Walter Lord ANTR sequel The Night Lives On, a 1st class passenger is quoted as complaining that more men might have been saved if the people from steerage hadn't taken up so much space in the "first class boats."

Does anyone know who it was who said that?
 
Jan 21, 2001
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Hi Neil:

I don't know exactly who said the line that Walter Lord used, but I think you can find a similar incident described in the extract from Daisy Speddens' diary. It was reprinted in the THS Commutator Magazine, vol. 16, no. 3, Nov 92 - Jan 93. I don't have it in front of me, but as I recall, Daisy objected to someone else who had complained along the lines of "too many steerage" passengers were saved, or something like that.

I can look it up later tonight, if you like.

Dave Billnitzer
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Bold? Wait till you read this:

"It makes me sick to think of all those women that are being brought into New York next Thursday without their husbands. What is this 'law of the sea' anyhow? The lives of several of those men on board that liner were worth more than a hundred women. I am referring to some of the emigrant women on that ship. We all know them the way they arrive here in America. Unable to speak the language, illiterate as they are, nobody can tell me that some of the fine men on that boat should stand back and let those people be saved. I think it is a crime.

What good will those people be when they arrive? A burden to the State. I am a suffragette, but I believe in discrimination ... "

New York American, April 17, 1912, p.10. Quoting the Duchess De Litta Visconti Arese (with that name, I might add that she was formerly Jane Perry - how about that!).

If that's not bold, I don't know what is!

Daniel.
 
Jan 21, 2001
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Hi again!

I found the Daisy Spedden reference I was looking for; it's not from her diary, it's from the epilogue to "Polar, the Titanic Bear." It reads simply:

"Daisy and Frederic Spedden were remembered by their fellow survivors for their many kindnesses, and Daisy records in her diary entry for April 15 that she went to bed 'worn out mentally and physically' after 'working all day looking after the people, our special proteges, besides some steerage passengers.' To her friend in Madeira, she wrote that 'we spend our time sitting on people who are cruel enough to say that no steerage should have been saved, as if they weren't human beings.' "

Sorry that it doesn't record "who" was saying such things, but it sounds as if there were more than one individual expressing such sentiments.

Dave Billnitzer
 

Kris Muhvic

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Sep 26, 2008
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Daniel-

I'm afraid the Duchess statements are not only vintage. From my understanding there is somewhat of a controversey regarding the "September 11" fund; who gets how much. Is an executive worth more than a janitor?, that sort of thing. Class barriers, even in death, seem to be the strongest substance out there!

Take care-
Kris
 
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Cassandra Crowther

Guest
It does seem that way, doesn't. Well, as the saying goes "Money talks and@$#%%&*@#! walks, I guess.
 
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Holly Peterson

Guest
That 'duchess' statement is absolutely disgusting! How can some people be so cruel?

Here's another similar statement, this time from a Cleveland Newspaper on April 21st 1912, said by Mrs. Alexander Preston. I found the quote in the book Titanic: The Great Lakes Connection.

"A man is a more valuable member of a community and of a nation than is a woman. I beleive in looking at the thing in a cold, impartial light. Why should a man like Major Butt have to die to save an immigrant woman? Colonel Astor was a man of power. I believe that any man on that boat who died did what he thought best. Theyw ere heroes in every sense of the word. They regarded obedience to the unwritten law of the sea to be their duty. But the law is wrong."
 
May 27, 2007
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Alas it seems Mrs. Preston compared and judged other women by her own meager accomplishments, perhaps? My Great-Great-Grandfather's sister came from Sweden at the age of 13 as an immigrant and became an early Woman Doctor, starting a Hospital somewhere in South Dakota. Showing what an immigrant woman or Man could be capable of. Isidor Straus was an Immigrant.
 

Kyrila Scully

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Apr 15, 2001
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Here's a bold statement for you. Guess who said it?

"They told me of the navigation laws restricting men from the boats when women and children were aboard. I replied that such must have been the ancient law, and now that equal rights existed...their conscience on that score should be relieved."

This same person went on to say, "'Women first' is a principle as deep-rooted in man's being as the sea. It is world-old and irrevocable. But to me it is all wrong. Women demand equal rights on land--why not at sea?"

The person who said this was Mrs. J.J. (Margaret) Brown, aka "Molly" Brown, and her words were echoed by suffragettes all over the US and England.

Mrs. Brown had been witness to Mrs. Isador Strauss's proclamation that she would remain with her husband on the ship and not take her place in the lifeboat. Mrs. Brown thought she showed good sense and decided to follow her example, but told the press that she was dragged into a lifeboat against her will.
 
May 27, 2007
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quote:

This same person went on to say, "'Women first' is a principle as deep-rooted in man's being as the sea. It is world-old and irrevocable. But to me it is all wrong. Women demand equal rights on land--why not at sea?"

Leave it to Margaret 'Molly' Brown to sum it up. If they had boats for all in the first place the folks on Titanic wouldn't of been in this pickle.​
 

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