Raise the Titanic model

Jon Hollis

Member
Jan 23, 2004
598
0
0
JOnathan Smith or anyone know what happened to the two large Tug Boats that were built for the film RTT this photo was taken in Malta
120111.jpg

Hopez thair ain't Know Spelleng Misteaks in dis poost
JWH
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
6,046
57
208
UK
Just passing on a message from a friend who is a non-member:

King's English? Please note, Mr Trower and all, that since my late father passed on more than half a century ago it's been my English that is customarily spoken in this realm.

Elizabeth R
 
Nov 15, 2006
131
0
86
Jon

I believe that both those tugs went the same way as the Titanic model and the navel vessels - left to rot away. The navel vessels were last seen in 1993 as just their fibre glass hulls.

Now, where have I seen that photo before ;)
happy.gif
 

Jon Hollis

Member
Jan 23, 2004
598
0
0
Ah, Jonathan That photo came from the collection of a real gentleman in the UK who has an amazing photo collection. Have suggested that others get hold of the newly released RTT Dvd from over there so they can see all of this honourable gentelmans very fine collection. Dew Hoope Mye Spalling and Grandma are coorect. Don't want the professor of the Kings Englash and Granma and to feel neglected
 
Dec 2, 2000
58,590
379
283
Easley South Carolina
>>After all said and done, the model doesn't belong to any of us on this board.<<

A very good point. You're right, it isn't. We might want to keep that in mind before getting too worked up about it.I think it's something of a shame that they didn't properly look after it, but is that really all that unexpected? Props built for movies are designed to look good on film and not last for the long haul. After this one served it's purpose, I doubt the studio gave it a lot of thought.
 

John Clifford

Member
Nov 12, 2000
1,686
0
166
56
Whatever else may be said, Mike and Tim, there is an intersting comparison to be made:
1. The model for the 1953 "Titanic" is displayed in the Fall River Maritime Museum;
2. The sinking Titanic model, used for "Death of a Dream/The Legend Lives On", is displayed at the Ulster Folk and Transport Museum, and is seen and admired by many visitors;
3. The model of the Queen Mary, used for "The Poseidon Adventure" is displayed at the Los Angeles Maritime Museum, complete with "Poseidon" displayed on the bow; while,
4. The model of the Titanic, used for the 1980 film version of "Raise the Titanic" is abandoned near a beach on Malta.

It is truly sad that for films that made a (modest) profit for their makers their models are displayed and maintained, but one used for a film that became a commercial "turkey" is now left to deteriorate near a Mediterranean Sea shore.
To me, that is, indeed, "a sad commentarty".

For Michael and Tim: if we can raise the necessary transportation funds, I know someone, in Canada, who would be quite grateful to have another Titanic model.
grin.gif

The alternative is "The Boston Venue"; just need to notify "Totally Surprised" (for when the model arrives at his condo).
wink.gif
 
Nov 15, 2006
131
0
86
<<<<props>>>>

Lew Grade had hoped that the two Titanc models and the other miniatures would be used elsewhere after RTT was completed. The only problem was - the Titanic model. Because of scale with water, the model had to be big to pass of the FX. The RTT model was 55ft long, and this was the problem. The only tank in the world big enough to house it was the deep water tank in Malta, and this was specially built for that model. After that, no one else wanted the model. The film flopped, ITC went into receivership, the models were then left in Malta. The Titanic model did go into storage for almost a year in one of the islands 500 year old grain warehouses. But when they needed the space, out it came again and into the eliments of the film studio. To this day, I still don't know what ever happend to the much smaller 6ft model seen when they tested its sinking with the smoke stack broken off. It was later reused for the film during a few close up shots as the ship heads towards the surface during the raising scenes.

2 of the subs for the film are still around, owned by someone in the U.S.

By reading between the lines, they felt that the model had (in a fashion) cursed the film industry, mainly the British film industry. By the time they had got themselves back on their feet, the dust had settled, it was too late - the model had fallen into disrepair (in their eyes).

Over the years, there has been some offers to buy whats left of the model, but it feel on deaf ears. From one company passing the buck to another "we dont own it, they do", then "no, sorry we dont own they do" and so on.

But who owns it? - who ever brought over ITC which is a British TV network named ITV who own other networks (Carlton/Granada).
 
T

Timothy Trower

Guest
John,

Your point is well made regarding the commercial success of a movie and the longevity of the model used. Add to that the problem with distance (for those of us in the United States) and with the odd bankruptcy tossed in for good measure, the RTT model was pretty much doomed when moved back out of storage.

My basic point now is that the model, or what is left of it, is in such poor shape that there can be no valid reason to even consider buying, moving and restoring the model. If anyone had the odd million or so dollars to do so they would be money ahead commissioning Ken Marschall to build an entirely new one.

Economics have completely finished this model. No amount of wishing otherwise can change this fact. Now, five minutes with a backhoe will take care of the problem for good.
 
Sep 26, 2009
494
1
46
Don't forget one of James Cameron's sinking models. It's stern is floating in a casino in Tunica, Mississippi. I have unconfirmed rumors that the bow is in a casino in Aurora, Illinois. I got an email from the owner of the two subs from RTT and he still has them. I had heard that the smaller RTT model was in an amusement park in Australia, but that is unconfirmed. Robert H. Gibbons
 

John Clifford

Member
Nov 12, 2000
1,686
0
166
56
I never considered restoring it; would rather see it given "five minutes with a backhoe" or sent down to "Davey Jones' Locker", rather than be seen rotting away because nobody can use it, nor wants it. It's sad, too, that no offers were ever accepted to have it hauled away, either; such is life.
 
Mar 3, 1998
2,745
4
0
I don't believe that Ken would mind if I confirmed that rumour. Unfortunately, his offer was not accepted.

Ken has not yet been commissioned to restore the complete 1997 model that as of 2005 was on display at Foxploration in Rosarito Beach, Mexico (check my website for pics). Overall, the model is in decent shape, but does require some work in order to be restored to its original condition.

Parks
 
Dec 4, 2000
3,239
483
213
There is no exact science to getting off a sinking ship. However, during WW-II it was recognized that a lot of merchant seamen were being lost due to lack of knowledge about proper abandonment procedures. In some cases, men died abandoning ships that were later towed to a shipyard and put back into service. With that in mind, Phil Richards and John J. Banigan wrote a book called, "How To Abandon Ship." It was published by Cornell Maritime Press in 1942, put in paperback in 1988, and then reprinted in 1992 as a 50th anniversary edition. Copies are hard to find, but should be available through major libraries. I suggest it as mandatory reading before pontificating on abandoning ship. The stuff of this book is written in the blood of men who did things wrong.

-- David G. Brown
 

Jon Hollis

Member
Jan 23, 2004
598
0
0
Went to Parks page and searched all but could not find the pictures of the model he mentioned. Any clues anyone
Thanks
JWH
 
T

Timothy Trower

Guest
David,

I've a copy of the book "How to Abandon Ship" (1942) that I occasionally use as an illustration in my talks. Your description as it being a book "written in the blood of men who did things wrong" is correct.