Reginald Robinson Lee

  • Thread starter lindsay gordon lee
  • Start date

Gordon Lee

Member
Jan 6, 2004
22
0
131
Was the Titanic a 'dry 'ship for the crew ?
I have received information that uncle Reginald had a serious alcohol problem as far back as January 1900
 
Oct 28, 2000
3,242
540
388
Here are a few passages from the IMM/White Star Line rule book that speak to "spirits" and the crew:


3. Company Affairs Confidential; Trading and Smuggling-- (c) No wines, spirits, or liquors of any description are to be brought on board by Officers or any member of the Crew. A search for same must be made by the heads of the respective departments as soon as possible after the ship leaves port, and any found must be confiscated and thrown overboard, and the proprietors of same logged.

4. Sales of Wines and Spirits to Crew.--Except with the special authority of the Management, no sale of wines or spirits for cash is to be made to any member of the ship's company...


-- David G. Brown
 

Gordon Lee

Member
Jan 6, 2004
22
0
131
According to his RN records Reginald was hospitalised on the 24 Jan 1898 with Delirium Trementia .He would have been 27 years old at the time .He joined the navy in December 1887. On 1st January 1900 his report showed 'cease to be trusted where liquor is obtainable'.Over a decade later as lookout on the Titanic a 'Dry' ship he must have overcome this problem .The responsibility was huge .To me the job he & the other lookouts had was similar ,in responsibility , to that of a modern Airline Pilot.
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
6,043
104
333
UK
This was a case where 'rules are made to be broken'. There are numerous memoirs of life at sea that suggest that members of victualing crews in particular didn't have much of a problem if they chose to partake during voyages. For the Titanic, of course, we have baker Joughin's testimony that he kept a bottle in his cabin, and a surprising frankness, perhaps, in volunteering that information at an official Inquiry.
 
Mar 22, 2003
6,294
1,582
383
Chicago, IL, USA
www.titanicology.com
According to Frederick Fleet (in an interview with Leslie Reade in September of 1964), Fleet believed that Reginald Lee was also shocked by the experience they shared the night of the accident. After leaving WSL, Lee joined the Union-Castle line and served on the Kenilworth Castle. Fleet told Reade, "he died of drink many years ago."
 

Gordon Lee

Member
Jan 6, 2004
22
0
131
A newspaper article was sent to me in Australia by David Lee of Portsmouth(Friend but,no relation).David is related to H.R.Lee.
My Great grandparents grave in Portsmouth has been kindly put into shape thanks to a second cousin who lives there .As well as my Grandparents Reginald Robinson Lee is buried there, and the Grave is part of a guided tour of that city.
The newspaper article gives details of a guided tour & the website www.friendsofhighlandroadcemetery.org.uk for more information.
Why Reginald is buried with his parents,what happened to his marriage & whether he had any dependants is still a mystery.
 

Megan McCarty

Member
Feb 28, 2009
18
0
71
I've read that Reginald Robinson Lee sailed back to England on the Celtic along with Quartermaster Hichens and some others after the disaster. I'm wondering why he didn't sail back right away with the rest of the crew. He did not testify before the US Inquiry and does not seem to have traveled with the others to Washington (http://www.titanicinquiry.org/USInq/AmInq04Fleet02.php):

Mr. FLEET.
Hogg and Symons are here besides me. The other three have gone home.

Senator SMITH.
Lee?

Mr. FLEET.
I do not know where Lee is. He got detained in New York.

Does anyone know why Mr. Lee left later in April on the Celtic?
 

Similar threads

Similar threads