Relative water levels inside/outside during sinking


Sep 27, 2015
4
0
11
I've heard from several sources that during the sinking, there was water that was above the surface. This sounded a but weird to me. Does anyone know if this is true?
 
J

Jack Dawson

Guest
Hi, your question is a little vague, but you are asking about water (inside the Titanic) flowing onto decks that were actually above the 'sinking' waterline?

Or are you asking about water flooding into a room, while the room on the deck directly below was dry?
 

Adam Went

Member
Apr 28, 2003
1,194
11
233
I'm assuming this probably refers to the watertight compartments which flooded to capacity and then spilled over into the neighbouring compartments?

Cheers,
Adam.
 

Jim Currie

Member
Apr 16, 2008
5,867
1,030
323
NewtonMearns, Glasgow, Scotland.
I'm assuming this probably refers to the watertight compartments which flooded to capacity and then spilled over into the neighbouring compartments?

Cheers,
Adam.


Probably, Adam.

The only way the water level or any other liquid level within a ship can be higher than the sea level outside is if it is contained in a compartment that is not open to the sea. If a compartment is breached, below sea level, the water pours in until it reaches the level of the sea outside then it stops rising. It is a physical impossibility for sea water to enter through a hull breach then rise higher than the outside sea level. Hence the expression "water finds its own level".

Jim C.
 

Adam Went

Member
Apr 28, 2003
1,194
11
233
Exactly, Jim. If there was instances of water in the Titanic being above the level of the ocean, then it must have been because that water was trapped in an area or compartment at that time and had not yet found a way to spill over.

Cheers,
Adam.
 
J

Jack Dawson

Guest
Hi, he could also have been referring to the flooding of passageways (such as Scotland road) allowing water into (and over) compartments and rooms not yet flooded from below.
 
Apr 26, 2017
110
23
63
I spent a good fifteen minutes trying to come up with a title that wouldn't get my question moved to some fourm under news. So forgive me if the thread name is weird (now the actual question. I was wondering about the differences between the outside water level and the water level inside the ship. Was it significant or did the water level inside the ship relatively keep up with the water level outside the ship
 

Kyle Naber

Member
Oct 5, 2016
1,066
551
188
20
Because of how slowly the ship actually sank, bow wise, I think the water level inside and out remained relatively even. However, this did not occur in the stern which had catastrophic consequences.
 
A

Aaron_2016

Guest
As the ship listed heavily to port there would be a difference in the flooding depending on which side the observer was on. e.g. A survivor on the starboard side would see the water rising up to C deck but a survivor on the port side might see the water rising higher up towards the promenade deck as the ship listed more to port. We also have survivors who were deep below decks and came up just as the last boat was leaving. This would suggest the decks below were not flooded despite being well below the waterline. Survivor Charles Joughin was in his cabin on E-deck after 1.30am. This is what he saw.


Q - Was there water on the floor of that passage? (Scotland road corridor)
A - Very little.
Q - As the ship listed over to port the water flowed down into your cabin and left the alleyway from which it came fairly dry?
A - Yes.
Q - Did you see or believe that more water was coming in while you were standing there?
A - I could not see any coming; I did not know where it came from at all.
Q - You have said that when you were down, I think in the pantry, or was it again when you were in your quarters, you heard a noise that you thought was the cracking, the breaking of the ship? What time would that be?
A - A few minutes after I had been to my room, I should say, after half-past one.

In theory that corridor should have been significantly flooded but according to survivors who were down there after 1:30 it was not flooded. In my opinion the water found a path and travelled aft, instead of up. His cabin was almost directly above the main engine room. If water was entering his cabin and not the corridor outside it may have come from open portholes further aft that were spilling water down into his cabin or perhaps the compartment below his feet was flooding and rising up to his cabin, or possibly as this was a few minutes before she broke it may have been water pipes bursting and pouring down into the cabins on the port side, or possibly the hull was slowly breaking open and flooding his cabin as it was right where the ship broke in two.


.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Similar threads

Similar threads