Brian Meister

Member
Mar 19, 1999
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Matthew and Mark,

It would, indeed, be interesting to know
who was booked to return on Titanic's 2nd leg.
Those records probably are buried DEEP in some
archives, or don't exist at all. A natural-
ization archivist once told me: "They only
cared about who came in, not about who left".
I discovered the cabin assignments for Lusitania's eastbound crossing (her last) in the
Archives some time ago, but I beleive they were
saved only because of the inquiry into the loss
of the ship.
As Mark pointed out, the Olympic, mired by
a personnel strike, missed it's intended
trip to New York, and those passengers who
were not returning home or immagrating ended
up taking other steamers back to England.
Would like to think these lists are out there
somewhere.

Best Regards,

Brian
 
A

Alex McLean

Guest
Hi, Titanic was set to make her return to England from New York on April 20th (to my knowlege, apologies if I am mistaken). Does anyone know who (apart from Andrews and Ismay who would have to return home) had booked a voyage back to England on Titanic for the last leg of her first crossing, particually first class passengers. Also, would Captain Smith still be in command on her return voyage. I have heard many stories about when he would retire, either at the end of the New York leg, or the full two way crossing, and even later on when Britannic was to come into service.
Help me out here
 

Dave Gittins

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Mar 16, 2000
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Can't help you with passengers, but Captain Smith was not going to retire. The rumour was twice denied by White Star. The last denial was issued on April 10th 1912. I think the rumour was promoted by the press after the sinking, just for dramatic effect.
 
A

Alex McLean

Guest
Thanks Dave, although I do think he would be reaching his time, being 62 at the time of the sinking.
 

Dan Cherry

Member
Dec 14, 1999
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Alex,
certainly Capt. Smith was closer to retirement than the beginning of his career, but I've not seen any credible evidence to suggest he was going to retire. I would imagine he likely would have commanded Britannic on her foreseen maiden voyage (having stood at the helm of all three Olympic-class sisters), had it not been for, of course, the events of April 14-15, 1912.
 

Jason D. Tiller

Moderator
Member
Aug 20, 2000
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Niagara Falls, Ontario
Hi Dave,

Thank you for that information, as I wasn't aware of it.

Best regards,

Jason
happy.gif
 
Jan 31, 2001
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I believe I read somewhere (but I can't remember the source) that the return voyage of the Titanic was booked nearly full. Can anyone confirm or deny this?


Cheers,
happy.gif


-B.W.
 
Jan 31, 2001
1,190
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Ah, Dr. P.! That's where I heard it! Well, I'll definitely take it lightly now that the author of my source has been identified. Thanks Mark.


Cheers,
happy.gif


-B.W.
 

Dave Hudson

Member
Apr 25, 2001
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I can't remeber who they were, but i remember reading an article dated before the sinking metioning a wealthy couple heading for Europe. At the end of the article, it mentioned that they'd be sailing on Titanic on 4/20. It was in the society column of a NY paper. I know that that doesn't help very much at all, but maybe someone could help provide more details. I'll post again with the name if no one else does.

Attempting to be helpful,

David
 

Jason D. Tiller

Moderator
Member
Aug 20, 2000
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Well, their was an advertisement stating that the Titanic was scheduled to leave for her return voyage on April 20. The ad does say "Tickets For Sale Here", so I'm thinking it was posted outside the White Star Offices in New York, but I could be wrong.

Best regards,

Jason
happy.gif
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Steven Biel in his book "Down with the old Canoe" mentions a 74 year old Mr Henry Adams that booked to sail back on the Titanic. I would agree that Ismay, Fry, Harrison, Andrews, Chisholm, Parr and others from H&W were very likely to return on Titanic, as they had no business in NY and were only taking the Titanic to observe her in action.

Before Olympic reached New York on her maiden voyage, newspapers were already printing the numbers booked to sail back. I don't recall the same thing for the Titanic. Not even after her sinking. I do recall reading in a newspaper mentions of White Star quickly rearranging travelling plans for those booked to return on Titanic. No numbers were mentioned though. Unfortunately there is little hope that any lists survive of Titanic's return bookings.

I do recall reading somewhere (for the life in me I cannot remember where) that a steward commented on the modest number of people taking the Titanic to New York, and then commenting that they received a marconigram mentioning that they a more heavily booked on the return trip. I don't know if it said booked full, or just much better booked than the first leg of the trip.

As for Capt. Smith, Mark Baber has done a great job transcribing some of Olympic's maiden voyage articles. These were from June 1911 and one of them talks about how Capt. Smith was to retire by the end of 1911 and who was to command the other ships Titanic and Gigantic (aka Britannic - this ship was still called the Gigantic as late as August 1912). I think the articles are still on ET. Have a look under Olympic's maiden voyage thread. I may be wrong as to where I read it, but I definitely recall it was from one of the articles Mark transcribed. Perhaps he would be able to help out on this.

Regards,

Daniel.
 
Dec 7, 2000
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I had read recently in the April 15, 1912, Christian Science Monitor (a Boston newspaper) that as many as 600 first class passengers had already booked to return on Titanic. That day the paper was still reporting the Titanic as being safe and on her way to be repaired.

Daniel.
 
P

Paul Jones

Guest
I read in a New York newspaper that Greta Hotstetter had a 1st class booking for the April 20th trip. Does anyone know who she was?
 
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Carrie Ann McMillan-Tarleton

Guest
I own a book called the complete Titanic Written by Stephen J Spignesi.I have read it numerous time and it never gets old.In this book there is a time line that begins in 1850 with the birth of Edward John Smith, and ends with April 10 2002.
According to this book it was announced(not sure by whom)in April 1998 that the South African-built
Titanic replica would be launched Wednesday,December 29,1999. It also states that a $500 million replica of the Titanic built by a Swiss-U.S. partnership called White Star Ltd. was scheduled to launch from Southampton Wednesday, April 10, 2002. Has anyone heard this before or since? Do these ships really exist?If so could someone point me in the right direction for me to read up on this?
 

Dave Gittins

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Mar 16, 2000
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Carrie, this one's been done to death. If you search this site, you will find quite a lot of discussion about it. Some of the supposed replicas were the dreams of teenagers without $10 between them. It isn't going to happen.

For an idea of the wild schemes that were put about on the back of Cameron's movie, go to http://www.put.com/gigantic/ The site hasn't been updated for some time, because nothing is happening.

Stand by for more wild schemes as 2012 approaches.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
G'Day Carrie, as Dave said, this idea has been knocking around since Cameron's movie came out. The fist such proposal I saw was the article published in Popular Mechanics back in 1997. (This magazine has a track record for predicting things inaccurately that has to be seen to be believed.) This is my now standard answer for why a replica is impossible;

1)Any exact replica would fail to meet current and anticipated SOLAS standards in regards to;
- Fire protection
- Lifesaving equipment, particualarly lifeboats
- Habitablity standards such as small cabins and no air conditioning would be unacceptable today
- Electrical systems not up to current codes.
- Radio systems obsolete
- Obsolete navigation equipment
2)Environmantal standards in regards
- Sewage Management
- Materials such as asbestos lagging would be unacceptable
- Coal firing of boilers would not meet current emissions standards
3)Technologies used then are no longer used today such as
- riveting
- Reciprocating steam engines are no longer built.
- Any attempt at replication would be extremely expensive as no tooling exists to produce same.
- Lack of experinced and trained people who would even know how to operate the ship.

The one thing you can be sure of is that this just scratches the surface. The last such scheme I was aware of hasn't been updated since April of this year.
 

Doug

Member
Jan 1, 1998
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I understand Titanic was to return to England on May 20th--- are there any return-trip tickets in existence?
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Mar 16, 2000
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Marconi never actually booked a westbound passage. Bruce Ismay invited him to go on the westbound voyage, as a distinguished guest. However, Marconi had urgent business in the USA, so he declined the offer and went on Lusitania. That's why he was able to meet Carpathia in New York.
 

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