Richard Frasar White


Mal Tempo

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Jun 13, 2016
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A new book on Richard White and his father Percival, Sr., is now available. It is entitled TALES OF A TITANIC FAMILY and features many photos from private family archives. Researched at Winchendon Springs, the birthplace of Richard and his father.
 
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Arun Vajpey

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A new book on Richard White and his father Percival, Sr., is now available. It is entitled TALES OF A TITANIC FAMILY and features many photos from private family archives. Researched at Winchendon Springs, the birthplace of Richard and his father.

I has missed this post before. I certainly will get this book if I can. The father and son pair of Percival and Richard White and my favourite Titanic passengers because of their exemplary gentlemanly behaviour in helping their shipboard lady friends while making no attempt to save themselves.

On board the Titanic, Percival and Richard occupied Cabin D26, which was alongside D28, in which the mother and daughter pair of Elizabeth and Mary Lines were staying. Elizabeth Lines mentioned how helpful and supportive the men were, including when Mary was feeling seasick and miserable. They probably were Dinner table companions as well.

After the collision, the Whites went to the Lines' room and warned them of the danger, helping them with their life-vests. Afterwards, they escorted the ladies to the boat deck and helped them into Lifeboat #9 before stepping back themselves. Both men perished in the sinking.

I feel that the Whites' action need rather more appreciation than it currently receives. By all accounts, they were a happy and successful family, having everything to live for. Also noteworthy is the fact that the Lines women escaped on Lifeboat #9, which was lowered at approximately 01:28 am, by which time everyone knew that the Titanic was sinking but the hurried tension that occurred later had not yet set in. Lifeboat #9 was a starboard lifeboat with Murdoch and McElroy in charge of the loading and launch; when it was eventually lowered, it had some 40 to 45 people at most on-board, including around 18 crewmen, far more than the number required to 'man' the oars. Despite that and around 20 places still available, Percival and Richard White made no attempt to get into the lifeboat - or any other boat as far as is known. I found their actions both heroic and tragic.
 
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