Riddle of the Mary Celeste

Dec 2, 2000
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Senan? Speechless? I'll put that one to the test tomorrow when I meet him in the bar.
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Senan, if you're peeking in on this, just look for the bloke with a full beard and long hair done back in a pony tail and a black bag with some Titanic books.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 

Inger Sheil

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Dec 3, 2000
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Sen's response obviously gave us all the solution to that final mystery - where the crew of the Mary Celeste went.

He had to be silenced.

(Hope you have a grand old time with all the attendees, Michael - I'm sure Sen's speechlessness, no doubt due to a parched throat, will not last long).

~ Ing
 
Dec 2, 2000
58,589
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Easley South Carolina
Thanks Inger. I'm sure I'll have a great time. Just wish I could have been there a little earlier for some of whatever they have going on now. Been a bear at work this week.

BTW, one of my workmates is promising to show me some material used in a school which dealt with the Big T. I have an impression from what little he's told me that it's riddled with half truths and outright errors. I'll let you know what I find out. I suspect if it's bad enough, I may be writing a letter to a school board.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
Apr 11, 2001
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There was a German made- for -TV movie in 1972 on the Mary Celeste- and a UK 1935 attempt at explaining the mystery- starring my favorite- Bela Lugosi as the one-armed seaman- I think this is available for sale.
 

Inger Sheil

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Dec 3, 2000
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Sen, it looks like you've turned her into a single funneled steamer.

Is that the real mystery of the Mary Celeste?

I tend to think of that fictional book The Raven about another mysterious disappearance at sea when considering the May Celeste. Not because of specific similarities in the two tales, but because in the end the author is able to reveal the chain of circumstances that lead to a final, apparently inexplicable result with supernatural overtones. I tend to put the Mary Celeste in the same 'weird-(deleted expletive) happens'. A sequence of events that would make perfect sense if there were any witnesses, but there weren't - so we're left with a baffling final result. Spots of what might - or might not - be blood on the deck, a broken blade, a hatch cover apparently blown off...and was there a broken skylight, from my vague recollections?

I'll always prefer the giant squid hypothesis over, say, the water spout theory. Not because I think it's the right one, but because I like the idea of vicious giant squid roaming the seas. I wouldn't even want to tackle a humbolt squid on a night dive!

~ Ing
 

Mark Baber

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Dec 29, 2000
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Yeah, yeah...typical human response...blame the poor misunderstood giant squid.

:-(

MAB
 

Senan Molony

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Jan 30, 2004
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It is also weird that Conan Doyle, who hoved and roved into the Titanic disaster, also largely created the myth and legend of the Mary Celeste - giving her the named "Marie Celeste" by which she is more commonly known nowadays. He popularised the whole mystery anew circa 1897, adding embellishments.
Conan Doyle would be a man for the supernatural explanation, for sure.
 

Inger Sheil

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Just for you, O Giant Squid (Celaphopodos Humungus Mabicus) I'll resort to scientific hypocrisy and backflip, renouncing my previously well thought out position ('I dunno - reckon a big squid sounds cool') and will take up the waterspout with gusto. Unless I offend the waterspout officianados by doing so.

Conan Doyle, eh? The man who gave us the 'mad midwife' theory in the Jack the Ripper case? Although 'Jill the Ripper' does have a ring to it.
 

Senan Molony

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I think the Mary Celeste (formerly the Amazon) finally sank off Haiti or somesuch.
Would make a good Ballard underwater discovery project, would it not?

Where are Benjamin Briggs' bones whitening now?
 

Mark Taylor

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Mar 18, 2005
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Conan Doyle also believed in fairies. He got taken in a famous hoax photographh that got wide distribution.

As for the Mary Celeste, there is no definitive answer. Unless, of course, you believe in the Dr. Who explanation.

:)
 

Inger Sheil

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Sen - going from the haziest of haziest memories here, but wasn't the Mary Celeste wooden hulled? In which case, going on past diving experience, we'd probably only see a pile of ballast and a few odds and ends, unless she's either very deep or part of her hull is beneath the mud and silt line. She was sunk as part of an insurance scam, wasn't she, with an absurdly over-valued cargo? If she were iron hulled there might be something there - they discovered a gorgeous wreck in Oz a couple of years ago, the 'Lady Darling'. The photos of her are lovely - she's sitting upright on a sandy bottom, looking remarkably intact for a ship that's been down there for over 100 years. I always meant to pop down the coast and dive her.

What is the Doctor Who solution, Mark? The Tardis swept them all away, did it, and they're currently dancing hornpipes on Gallifrey(sp)?
 

Mark Taylor

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Mar 18, 2005
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Inger-In one episode of Dr. Who (the original Dr. Who) called Time Chase, the Daleks chase the good doctor through time. The Tardis materializes on a sailing vessel. They get out and explore. Unfortunately the Daleks were able to track and land there as well. So while the Doctor and his companions fight their escape into the Tardis and escape, the Daleks attack the crew causing them all to go overboard. Then we see the name of the ship-Mary Celeste. Seems as good an explantion as others I have heard (Atlantis, vile vortices etc.)

Mark