Rose after Titanic


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Kristen Maitland

Guest
One thing that's always bothered me is what would've happened to Rose immediantly after arriving in New York.

Here we have a young woman of 17 who had lived like royalty all her life and most likely had no skills at all. Everything she had went down with the ship and she was completely alone for at least a certain amount of time. We're expected to believe she made it on her own and lived upto her promises to Jack to get married, have babies, etc.

What I'd like to know is just how Rose managed to scrape herself up from being something with nothing. In those times it would've been VERY hard to pull one's self out of poverty, get a job, find a place to live, ESPECIALLY for a young woman who was on her own. In reality Rose would've probably been living on the streets without any hope of making it. She would've most likely died of starvation or something too.

I always thought she was stupid/crazy to give up EVERYTHING for a man she'd know for some three days and then still not gone back to at least Ruth after Jack's death. I think most people would've gone crawling back, especially in those days.
 
I have wondered the same thing myself Kristen. I also wonder how she explained that as Rose Dawson she boarded the ship in steerage when the lists were made up of survivors! Did you ever wonder WHY she kept that silly Heart of the Ocean? It could have been recut and sold for big bucks. Considering her feelings about Old Cal, surely it wasn't sentimental. Then she ends by tossing it into the drink anyway so what was the purpose- it had nothing to do with Jack other than that he painted her in it. I suspect any gal as pretty and spunky as Our Rose probably found work easily in New York, and we know she captured a hubby who must have given her a comfy life judging by her photos.
 
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Kristen Maitland

Guest
Oh that tossing-the-necklace-into-the-ocean scene always bugged the heck out of me. If she couldn't stand it anymore, why not just give it to the those treasure hunters or her granddaughter? Instead she doesn't think and just tosses it overboard...what a waste, and very selfish. But then she *was* an old woman, probably reliving the experience of the Titanic by sharing her story probably upset her incredibly, so I always make a lot of allowences for Old Rose.
 
>>Oh that tossing-the-necklace-into-the-ocean scene always bugged the heck out of me.<<

I don't know about that. I found it a tad funny myself, but that's just me. Seems that at a hundred years old, it didn't have a lot of meaning to her. It's not as if she could take it with her into whatever awaits on the 'other side.'

>>If she couldn't stand it anymore, why not just give it to the those treasure hunters or her granddaughter? Instead she doesn't think and just tosses it overboard...what a waste, and very selfish.<<

The treasure hunters were there for altruistic reasons?
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In another Titanic site, a background is given for Rose. It mentions that she is from a very well-to-do family in Philadelphia. So I imagine she could go back there but I doubt it as that might mean running into her mother.

As far as staying in NY, I think she went into acting so it was a good place to be for that at the time.

Plus, she wanted to do all the things she and Jack talked about doing so there was a lot on her plate.

For me, the necklace was "the heart of the Ocean". The ocean is where Jack ended his life and she loved him so I guess she would toss "the heart" where he is resting. I think it was more or less, a tribute or a remembrance. The monetary value of the necklace meant nothing to her compared to her feelings for Jack.
 
>I suspect any gal as pretty and spunky as Our Rose probably found work easily in New York, and we know she captured a hubby who must have given her a comfy life judging by her photos.

Well, of course, any man would gladly pay for a nubile, attractive redhead...or is there any other realistic way she could have made money in NYC? ;)
 
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Tom Pappas

Guest
any man would gladly pay

That's a rather sweeping generalization, don't you think? Perhaps you are speaking from your own experience, and not that of the three billion men you are so cavalier to libel?
 

Don Tweed

Member
Hockley was willing to pay, and you saw what kind of man he was.
Thank the maker not all men are cast from the same mold.
This is all fiction of course, but I think with the character Rose was portrayed as being, that person was to headstrong to just "lay down", pardon the expression, for any man.
Just my opinion, Don
 
Rose was portrayed as a smart and headstrong woman. She would have made out fine and honorably when she got to America. My great-grandparents were immigrants from Lithuania and they got jobs in shoe factories and as clerks in grocery stores. They had the will and desire to make a life for themselves just as Rose would have. Rose would never had "sold" herself to survive.

I don't even think Rose was the type of person who felt the she "needed" a man to complete herself. She would have only married someone if they complimented each other. Rose's way of thinking was way too advanced for the time she lived. She definitely did not want to fit into the roles created for females in that era.

As for Cal, I think he looked at Rose as a trophy.
 
>Perhaps you are speaking from your own experience, and not that of the three billion men you are so cavalier to libel?

What, Mr. Pappas, are you trying to imply I've had the experience of being a hot-looking redhead in 1912 New York City who was perhaps pressed into doing something immoral for the sake of earning some money? Now, how the heck would that work exactly, if I'm presently typing these words into a computer? I'm not that elderly, and I'm not of the vampire class.
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As for cavalierly libelling men, the temptation is far too easy, and I just have to go with it. :p
 
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Tom Pappas

Guest
I assumed you wrote from the point of view of a nubile, attractive redhead - otherwise how could your words have any credibility at all?

So it now appears that you not only impute motivation to half the people on this planet, it's motivation you've never experienced yourself.

Cheesh. And they call men sexist pigs!
 

Jason D. Tiller

Moderator
Member
Hi Tom,

I don't quite understand your post above to Kritina.

"I assumed you wrote from the point of view of a nubile, attractive redhead - otherwise how could your words have any credibility at all?"

Even if Kritina isn't a redhead, why does that make her words have any less credibility? It seems to me she was just assuming what Rose would have done, in that kind of a situation.

"Cheesh. And they call men sexist pigs!"

Who said anything about being sexist?
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Confused,

Jason
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None of us have had the experience in being s young red hed in new york in 1912. we are just simply looking at what sort of things someone in that situation would do or could do to get by...
 
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Tom Pappas

Guest
Jason, Kritina's statement that begins, "any man would gladly pay..." is sexist, because it presumes a certain behavior based upon an individual's gender. I personally know hundreds of men who wouldn't pay under any circumstances, and I have no doubt that there are millions (perhaps billions) more.
 
>Kritina's statement that begins, "any man would gladly pay..." is sexist, because it presumes a certain behavior based upon an individual's gender. I personally know hundreds of men who wouldn't pay under any circumstances, and I have no doubt that there are millions (perhaps billions) more.

Dude, are you serious? Or is this some sort of peculiar satire designed to pull my lariat?

It was just a statement, give it a rest.

(My first official use of the word "dude" on a messageboard...yay me!).
 
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Tom Pappas

Guest
Have it your way, babe.

Just include me OUT when you throw around blanket statements about how any group of which I am a member will behave in scenario x.
 

Jason D. Tiller

Moderator
Member
Tom,

"Jason, Kritina's statement that begins, "any man would gladly pay..." is sexist, because it presumes a certain behavior based upon an individual's gender. I personally know hundreds of men who wouldn't pay under any circumstances, and I have no doubt that there are millions (perhaps billions) more."

Sorry, but I don't see it that way. We'll just have to agree to disagree on this one.
 
Wow, well I can appreciate you opinion on the topic however you have misinterpreted one key element in the story of Jack and Rose.

Rose DID NOT give up everything for Jack. She gave up her lifestlye (which by Edwardian standards imprisoned her) for a new life. A life that the sinking of Titanic was capable of giving her.

The sinking of the Titanic itself represented the end of a way of life that had been culminated for a millenia and perfected by the Victorian's. Ironically it was the ideals of the Victorian's own industrial revolution that threatened their way of life the most. The age of progress built the machines and mechanisms that would devastate entire generations in WWI.

So with Titanic as the last great Edwardian bastian it was a perfect catalyst for the launching of this young woman into a life she prefered to have rather than the one she was expected to live. Her determination to live through the night was probably the same determination she called upon in the following years.

Pretty women were popular in early films of the late Edwardian period and in the 20's. We know she became an actress, this would have been an easy field for her to enter with few skills other than looking elegant.

I've always been more concerned with Ruth and how she fared. I'd like to think she remarried rich and lived out her life in New Port Rhode Island.
 
>>Wow, well I can appreciate you opinion on the topic...<<

Whose opinion would that be? If it's that of Mr. Pappas, it's unlikely you'll get a response since he passed away last year.
 
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