Rotterdam At Home At Last

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Mirriam Wood

Guest
Perhaps of interest to some ...

I received this press release from a friend in Holland:
"June 2001 The Dutch investment group IMCA has bought de Rembrandt out of the bankruptcy of Premier Cruises for $26,5 milj. The Rembrandt, the formerly ROTTERDAM-5, built in the Netherlands in 1959 was the biggest passenger vessel built in the Netherlands ever. Until her sales to Premier Cruises in 1997, she was the flagship of the HAL. It was a splendid ship,
designed for the Trans Atlantic crossing. After the trans atlantic crossing was ended, she entered the cruise market and was one of the most lovely cruiseships.
The investment group Imca owns in the Netherlands several buildings, a shipyard and docks. They will use the Rotterdam as a 600-rooms hotel and convention center in Amsterdam. The ship will undergo a 6 milj. Dutch guilders rebuild at Shipdock - Amsterdam. The only obstacle of selling can be, that the town council of Amsterdam does not give the permission for the right harbour location of the ship."
 

Jan C. Nielsen

Senior Member
Dec 12, 1999
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That's great news, Mirriam. I had been watching this to see if Rotterdam V would survive. I never traveled aboard her, but I saw her in Southampton, many years ago. The ship has been interesting, and innovative aspects in its construction. Here's a photograph:
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M

Mirriam Wood

Guest
Oh - how beautiful she is, Jan! Thanks for sharing this picture.
What do you think of her as a Hotel, though?
I suppose it's better than the alternative ...
 

Jan C. Nielsen

Senior Member
Dec 12, 1999
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Mirriam,

As hotels, these ships work. I've been aboard the Queen Mary several times, and even stayed overnight in one of the first class staterooms. It's an enjoyable experience. Moneywise, it's difficult for the owners because much of the space is taken up by engines and the like --space that could be used for rooms.

One nice thing I've heard is that the Rotterdam has been preserved in her original design. So that she's pretty much original to the day she was launched.

HAL's Ryndam II ended up as a casino in Gulfport, Mississippi. So, I think Rotterdam IV is doing much better.
 

Eric Sauder

Member
Nov 12, 2000
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Hi, Miriam:

If what you posted about the Rembrandt (ex-Rotterdam V) comes true, I will be doing backflips. I sailed aboard her seven times (five as Rotterdam and two as Rembrandt), and she ruined me for most other ships. She is not only a classic (built in 1959), but both of her owners kept her original interiors in nearly pristine condition. Of course, there was a change or modification here and there, but stepping aboard her was like going back in time.

Speaking of classic liners, is anyone doing the Steamship Historical Society cruise on the s.s. Independence around Hawaii on June 30? If so, please e-mail me privately.

It's true that the Ryndam is in Gulfport, Mississippi, but for those who don't know, her interiors were completely gutted (as well as several decks being removed) to make way for new the glitzy, multi-deck casinos. There is virtually nothing left in her public spaces that dates from her Holland America days. Her entire bridge and lower decks, however, remain intact.

Eric Sauder
 
M

Mirriam Wood

Guest
Eric - Start doing backflips
proud.gif
:
The Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf reported June 16th that the Rembrandt has been sold and will be taken to Amsterdam. She will be converted to a hotel and convention center. Dutch real estate investor Erik De Vlieger is reported to be the buyer.
Joyfully,
Mirriam
 
M

Mirriam Wood

Guest
Hello, Michael Standard, our Sage!
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Could you enlighten me as to why on earth they decided to scrap the Nieuw Amsterdam II?
Seems absolutely criminal to me!

Warm regards,

Mirriam
 
M

Mirriam Wood

Guest
Eric -
You wrote:
"It's true that the Ryndam is in Gulfport, Mississippi, but for those who don't know, her interiors were completely gutted (as well as several decks being removed) to make way for new the glitzy, multi-deck casinos. There is virtually nothing left in her public spaces that dates from her Holland America days. Her entire bridge and lower decks, however, remain intact."

I believe you are referring here to the old RYNDAM, not the present 1993 built ship.
Old RYNDAM... No. 2 in the fleet, was built in 1951. Sold out of HAL in 1968 she became the ATLAS. Several name changes later she is now moored as a floating casino in Galveston. It is very possible that her old lower decks are intact - nothing much down there that was worth changing. The sweeping modern lines she now displays hide what is behind... the original bridge. Look closely at photos and you can still see what is there.
Any comments?

Warm regards
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
Hi Mirriam, I wasn't even aware that the ship was gone so I can only speculate as to why. There are a lot of factors which play in a decision to scrap a ship. Economics being at the very core of the matter. How old is the hull, how much wear and tear is on it? What is the condition of the accomodations and machinary? Is the ship economical to operate? Can she be made that way? How much would it cost to make needed repairs and refurbishmnts?

Then there is the matter of the ever fickle travelling public to consider. If a ship is unpopular or perceived as out of date, they lose out big time to those that are considered fashionable and trendy.

Any way you look at it, it's always the bottom line which floats the boat or sinks it. In this respect, the market is pretty darwinian.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
Dec 2, 2000
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From Cruise Critic:

HAL's "Grand Dame" Returns Home At Last
quote:

Buzz may be building as Cunard's Queen Elizabeth 2 nears her final sail date (November 11), but another beloved old ship was the focus of attention this week in Rotterdam. Holland America's Rotterdam V, its one-time flagship, pulled into Rotterdam for good; there, after years of planning, the ship will be permanently docked and serve as a floating hotel.
For the rest, see http://www.cruisecritic.com/news/news.cfm?ID=2715

Comment: Nice to see that a notable passenger vessel has found a home for a dignified retirement. Let's hope that the new owners don't screw it up.​
 

Joe Russo

Member
Apr 10, 2006
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Rotterdam V Holds Lifeboat Drill on Dry Land
quote:

Here’s a collage of pictures shot on December 17 during the safety evacuation try-out of the TSS ROTTERDAM, which I and 999 other volunteers attended. The second and last try-out was a huge success – within 7.40 minutes 1,000 people were evacuated from the ship to the pier.

Another step forward to the opening February 15, 2010.
http://www.hollandamericablog.com/2009/12/18/rotterdam-v-holds-lifeboat-drill-on-dry-land/
 
Dec 2, 2000
58,589
379
283
Easley South Carolina