Rubaiyat

  • Thread starter Liz Greco-Nieves (Liz)
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Liz Greco-Nieves (Liz)

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Does anyone know who owned the famed Rubiyat when the ship when down and was it ever recovered?
 

George Behe

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Dec 11, 1999
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Hi, Liz!

On March 29, 1912 Gabriel Weis won the Rubiayat at Sotheby's (London) auction house for $2.025. The volume has not been recovered (to date, anyway.) :)

All my best,

George
 
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BC

Guest
Hey, who else here has the Titanic Adventure out of Time game? The Rubaiyat (as I believe it is spelled) is a gold covered book with jewels encrusted in it.
 
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Laurel E. Oberdorfer (Laureleo)

Guest
BC:

I have the Titanic: Adventure Out of Time game, and yes, the Rubaiyat is the jewel covered book. I'm must be stupid, because I had to buy a hints book to figure out how to play. And I've done no better than to only get the Rubaiyat off of the ship. Can't figure out where the notebook is, or how to get the necklace. I could read the entire book and totally cheat, but don't want to do that!

Laurel
 
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David Huffaker (Davidh)

Guest
Do a web search for "titanic" and "adventure out of time". Several people have posted free hints that willget you off the ship with the 'goods". It becomes more fun when you go beyond the basic hints. Enjoy.
 
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Harry Kollatz Jr.

Guest
Greetings one and all:
I'm working on a play in which the Titanic's jeweled "Rubiáyát" serves as the fulcrum of action.
In the play, somehow the book was spirited off the stricken vessel. The how and why of all this is deliberately rather hazy, suffice to say that the volume has circulated (or not circulated) just under the legal marketplace since 1912.
Now, it has surfaced, and adventure and danger are the results.
My question, if Mr. Behe visits these parts, is if he, or anyone, knows anything about Gabriel Weis. I had the impression (don't know why) that the book was headed for the Morgan Library, which makes the book's loss even more acute. The Rubiáyát's sensual poetry concerns life, lovemaking, drinking, and the frustrating search for a divine presence in creation.
Here is the tycoon's latest acquisition, on the ship his wealth helped make and on which he'd nearly made passage himself. It is a ship built with extraordinary concern for comfort, especially of its First Class, but, what better a vessel to carry a copy of the humble tentmaker's poems, decorated with 1,295 jewels?
I don't necessarily need to let the facts get in the way of a good story, but, being an aficionado of the disaster since reading Mr. Lord's book when I was 14, I'd like to try to at least lend an air of probability to the tale.
My direct e-mail is [email protected]
Cheers.
Harry
 

Pat Cook

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Apr 27, 2000
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Just a note here, concerning the book. You may already have this but thought I'd post it anyway. This paragraph is from "The Deathless Story of the Titanic" published by Lloyds Weekly News right after the catastrophe:

'The copy of Fitzgerald's translation of Omar Khayyam, with Eliku Vedder's beautiful illustrations, famous as "the most remarkable specimen of binding ever produced" went down with the "Titanic". Less than a month ago it realized 405 pounds at auction where it found an American purchaser. The binding took two years to execute, and the decoration embodied no fewer than 1,500 precious stones, each separately set in gold.'

And, if I had to guess, I would bet the American purchaser was (or a buyer for) Harry Widener, noted rare book collector.

Just a thought. Hope this is of some help.

Best regards,
Cook
 

Mike Herbold

Member
Feb 13, 2001
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Or to add an air of mystery, maybe the buyer was actually William Andrews Clark, the uncle of Walter Miller Clark. He was also a noted bibliophile. His valuable collection is still intact as part of the UCLA library system.
 
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Rolf Vonk

Guest
Just some months ago I read in the newspaper that there was found a trunk or suitcase filled with books in the debrisfield of Titanic. Could this have belonged to Mr Widener of the Clarks?

Regards,

Rolf
happy.gif
 

Dave Hudson

Member
Apr 15, 2011
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Hey,
Does anyone know where the rubiayat would have been stored? Which hold? Have any attempts been made (or have been scheduled for the future)to locate it?
Regards,
David
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Am thinking about reading it was encased in a hermetically sealed pouch and stored in the purser's safe..now to try and remember where I read this!
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Seems to me the cover had a peacock with its tail all fanned out, studded with jewels where the "Eye" in the feathers were located- The Illustrated Night to Remember shows this.-Ironic- the peacock is the symbol for vanity- and the Resurrection!
 
May 12, 2005
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The jewelled peacock cover of the lost "Rubiayat of Omar Khayyam" is not the only ironic connection to the story of Titanic.

I just came across verse 16:

The Worldly Hope Men Set Their Hearts Upon
Turns ashes - or it prospers, and anon,
Like Snow upon the Desert's Dusty Face,
Lighting a little hour or two - is gone.

And in verse 33:

Earth could not answer, nor the Seas that mourn
In flowing purple of their Lord forlorn,
Nor rolling heaven, with all his signs revealed,
And hidden by the sleeve of Night and Morn.
 
Mar 15, 2001
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I have always wondered if any of the salvagers have items in their private collections. How would anyone ever know if this priceless book was found? It would be the ultimate Titanic collectable.
 
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Nathan Lee Casteel

Guest
That is an interesting question Darren and I don't know the answer to that.
 

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