Ruth Becker

Johan Jonsson

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Apr 4, 2005
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In one interview with Ruth Becker she says "When we got on I looked in a great big window into a beautiful dining room, and the silver and the linen, everything was beautiful and new" Do this mean that she was one of those second class passengers who took the tour of the first class areas before Titanic sailed?
 

John Clifford

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Nov 12, 2000
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Johan, Ruth Becker spent some of the time, on the Titanic, strolling around with her brother Richard. During the strolls, she had a chance to look in on a dining room area. Which dining room it was I don't recall. A lot of Ruth's recollections were printed in "Illustrated History", which was dedicated to her and Edwina Troutt McKenzie
 

Johan Jonsson

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Apr 4, 2005
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Yes I have read that book, but it does not say anything about her touring the first class (Or at least I do not recall having read it), and the second class passengers were only allowed into first class during the tour. The second class dining saloon does not fit her description of the linens and silverware, it sounds almost too fancy to be second class (Allthough the second class areas were quite luxurious aswell).
 

John Clifford

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Johan, you might also review Ruth's statements in "Death of a Dream/The Legend Lives On"; that is where I remember her remarks about looking in on the Dining Room during strolls on the decks.

The linens and silverware in the Second Class Dining Room were probably quite nice, since some people stated that Second Class on the Titanic was as nice as, if not better than, First Class on other steamers.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Ruth boarded the ship along a gangway positioned directly above the 2nd Class dining room, so she could have caught a glimpse of the table settings "when we got on", though a porthole hardly qualifies as a "great big window". Once on the ship, it would be possible to see into either the 1st or 2nd Class dining rooms through an open door, but not through a window. If she did take the opportunity to tour the 1st Class areas and was allowed into the Cafe Parisien, that's a location from which she could have looked into the a la carte restaurant through a large window.
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Jul 1, 2005
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When the ship was sinking, the Beckers all went to the lifeboats. Marion was grapped and was put in one of the last lifeboats. 5 seconds later the same thing happened to Trevor. Nellie got afraid, screamed and jumped in the lifeboat. Ruth didn't so she stayed alone on the Titanic. As al 12-year old, she stayed calm and finded another lifeboat. But if your family is on a lifeboat, you not, and you stand next to thousands of hysterical people, you remain calm and find another lifeboat. That's pretty darn well done.. Respect!
 

John Clifford

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Actually, Matt, what happened was that Ruth was standing behind her mother, as Lifeboat #11 was being loaded. As soon as Marion & Richard Becker were placed on board, the command was given "That's all for this boat!!", to which Nellie Becker pleaded to be allowed in, exclaiming "Please, these are my children!! My babies!!". She was, thus, allowed in the boat, at which point the order was given to "Lower Away"!!.

Nellie, realizing Ruth was still on the Titanic, then screamed "Ruth!! Get in another boat!!", to which Ruth immediately proceeded to Boat #13, and was allowed to get in.

It was the next day, after everyone got on board the Carpathia, that Ruth started to look for her mother, brother, and sister. That was when a woman stopped her, and asked "Excuse me, is your name Ruth Becker"?. When Ruth answered "Yes, it is", the woman told her, "Well your mother has been looking everywhere for you". At that point Ruth was reunited with her family.
 
Jul 1, 2005
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John,

I know that it didn't lasted long before Ruth was put in lifeboat 13. But Nellie actually did screamed and jumped on the lifeboat. But yes, she did say that here children were on the boat.
 
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Adam Tarzwell

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Possibly could Ruth Becker have been wheeling her brother on A Deck and looked into the Palm Court/Verandah Cafe? I mean I don't know if at any time in the voyage 2nd class passengers were allowed in that area... they had big huge windows.
 
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João Carlos Pereira Martins

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I suppose my question doesn't implicate a new thread, but I know a single interview of Ruth Becker, the one that appears in the recent Cameron's DVD (the one she's wearing a red shirt. Is there any registers of the interview's date? I'm interested in other interviews and conferences she gave at old age.
 

John Clifford

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Joao, it is possible that the same interview was included in "Death of a Dream/The Legend Lives On". My guess is that it was sometime in the late 1980s, after the Titanic was found.
Ruth had died before "Death of a Dream/The Legend Lives On" first aired.
 

John Clifford

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Ruth also was interviewed after September 1, 1985. She was another survivor who wished that the wreck site be left alone. She is also the last survivor to have had her ashes scattered at the wreck site.
 
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João Carlos Pereira Martins

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She died in July 6 and I did one minute silence for her death at 9.00am. She was a nice lady!
 

Andy In

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Feb 19, 2006
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that's very nice of u to do that. my church did that at there prayer meeting. but did she have another son? because i heard from my dad's friend that she had a son named Roger.

Andy
 

Andy In

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Feb 19, 2006
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my church did that at there prayer meeting too. did she have another son? because i heard from my dad's friend who was also at the prayer meeting that she also had a son named Roger.

Andy
 
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João Carlos Pereira Martins

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Yeah, I heard she had a son who lived in Mexico. Don't know if he's still alive!

João
 
May 1, 2004
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I bought a VHS copy of the A & E documentary on Titanic Death of a Dream / Legend lives on. That was before 1990, about two years after the ship was found.

I still feel a catch in my throat when Ms. Becker-Blanchard broke down describing the cries of the women.