Sad part in the film

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Roy Kristiansen

Member
Will, I think Hitchcock once showed a little boy being killed by a bomb - it might have been in "Sabotage" (not "Saboteur"). His aim, he said, had been to shock the audience, but apparently it just made them angry. He vowed he'd never do such a thing again.
 
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Bob Godfrey

Member
Harming kids is bad enough, but if you want to really shock the audience ...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8_RKPGS2vwM

Smile
 
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George L. Lorton

Member
Lol
Lol
Lol


Candygram for Mongo?

Me Mongo.

!!BOOM!!

One of these days I'm going to watch that Movie and end up in the hospital from ruptured sides from laughing too hard.
 
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Jason Schleisman

Member
"Blazing Saddles" indeed! Yet another addition to my video que.

Roy, I dunno about a bomb, but Hitchcock showed a young boy being impaled by an iron fence in Spellbound. I saw this movie as a teen and was quite upset by the fact that they showed a young boy being killed in such a fashion. Needless to say, I have no love of iron fences.
 
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Ben Lemmon

Member
That was rather startling indeed, Jason. However, the tale is weaved together with such intricacy that such an aspect has to be taken in with the rest of the story. It also shows how the brother died.

However, I am no particular fan of iron fences either. As I pass one of those after seeing the movie, my mind flashes to that scene in the movie, producing a little shake that travels through my body.

Could you imagine accidentally doing that to your brother, though? No wonder he suffered repression.
 
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Jason Schleisman

Member
quote:

As I pass one of those after seeing the movie....
Me too, Ben. And I DO have a little brother, which made it even more unpleasant. Although it was a good film, I will not ever watch it again.​
 
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Roy Kristiansen

Member
>>Hitchcock showed a young boy being impaled by an iron fence in Spellbound.

Right, the Salvador Dali dream sequence! Spellbound was an early attempt at introducing psychoanalysis into feature films. No wonder Gregory Peck's character grew up a little "off." Fortunately, Hitch spared us having to watch Norman Bates kill his mother. (Urrgh!)

Roy
 
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Roy Kristiansen

Member
P.S.--One of the original Spellbound posters was quite lurid. It showed Bergman and Peck embracing, she with a high anxiety expression on her face and he with an opened straight razor in his hand behind her back. The caption was: "Will he Kiss me or Kill me?"
 
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Chung Rex

Member
By the way, I have read the plan of Titanic but I cannot figure out where (which deck) Cora drowned. Can anyone guess?

The place Jack and Rose were trapped was also terrible, but I cannot decide it was E-deck or F-deck, and the escape route of Jack and Rose.
 
Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
Chung, the flick took quite a few liberties with the internal layout of the ship so I wouldn't kill myself looking for some of these places on the ship's plans. Some didn't exist on the real ship and others, such as the Master-At-Arms shack are in the wrong place.
 
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Russell Smith

Member
For me it's this part, right after the sea crashes in on Cpt. E.J. Smith, because you know most of the people are going to die horribly.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=oEQEttKkx4Y&feature=related

I thought the movie was good, but I only bought it because of the effects and to see the Titanic in all her glory. The Rose & Jack storyline was strictly "chick flick".
Happy
 
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George L. Lorton

Member
The chaos in Steerage (Third Class) is what got to me. All those people with nobody to help them. I had read about it before but seeing it was something else. The scene where the Irish Mother is in her cabin with her two children. A lot of steerage people did go back to their cabins. They just didn't know what to do or where to go. They were neglected to death.
 
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Russell Smith

Member
quote:

The chaos in Steerage (Third Class) is what got to me. All those people with nobody to help them.

Even in death, class separated the victims. On the Mackay-Bennett, first class corpses were placed in coffins & placed on deck. The corpses of 2nd and 3rd class passengers, as well as crew, were sewn into canvass bags and placed in an ice filled hold.​
 
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George L. Lorton

Member
quote:

Even in death,

Yes even in death there was segregation. Of course I think the families of the rich were the ones paying for there loved ones to be returned to them or there was a promise of a cash reimbursement for the body of Someone which looked like the person had been a person of means in life. I could be mistaken though.​
 
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Russell Smith

Member
quote:

Yes even in death there was segregation. Of course I think the families of the rich were the ones paying for there loved ones to be returned to them or there was a promise of a cash reimbursement for the body of Someone which looked like the person had been a person of means in life. I could be mistaken though.

I don't believe so. Things were so hectic for the the first few days that very few deaths were confirmed. Many people who didn't even make the departure for one reason or another were assumed to be aboard.

In that time ship to shore communication and vice versa wasn't an exact science. From what I summize, classification of the deceased was based on any ID available, their manner of dress, jewelry or any cash on them.​
 
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