Sad part in the film

R

Robert T. Paige

Member
quote:

>>For me it's this part, right after the sea crashes in on Cpt. E.J. Smith, because you know most of the people are going to die horribly.<<

One of the comparisons between ANTR and the 1997 movie was this scene....In ANTR, the scene shows Smith going into the wheel house and ends just before the sea would have crashed in, while in the 1997 movie the sea is shown crashing in.

Don Lynch makes a point of this in his ANTR commentary that he would have shown the sea crashing in.
 
G

George L. Lorton

Member
quote:

classification of the deceased was based on any ID available, their manner of dress, jewelry or any cash on them.

True!, but I'm saying that if the body looked to be that of a First Class Passenger, they (McKee-Bennett) would put the body in a coffin in hopes of maybe the family paying for the body's transport or the White Star Line paying a cash reimbursement for expenses for transporting the body of the deceased. Of course if the deceased looked to be crew or steerage then it was burial at sea in most cases.​
 
R

Robert T. Paige

Member
quote:

>>Chung, the flick took quite a few liberties with the internal layout of the ship so I wouldn't kill myself looking for some of these places on the ship's plans. Some didn't exist on the real ship and others, such as the Master-At-Arms shack are in the wrong place.<<

Interesting (or not, as the case may be for the reader :)little bit of trivia.:

When we stayed at Hotel Queen Mary at Long Beach a few years ago, I compared the layout of our room with an old Cunard Deck Plan of RMS Queen Mary. Some of the bulkheads had been removed, cabins combined and rooms re-numbered in the process of conversion to Hotel Queen Mary.
 
R

Russell Smith

Member
Valid point George. All in all, the wealthy were given preferential treatment. It's that English Class system, which for all intents, exists today.
 
Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
>>When we stayed at Hotel Queen Mary at Long Beach a few years ago, I compared the layout of our room with an old Cunard Deck Plan of RMS Queen Mary. Some of the bulkheads had been removed, cabins combined and rooms re-numbered in the process of conversion to Hotel Queen Mary.<<

That's par for the course for any ship. Changes are made throughout her operational lifetime of just about every kind imaginable. The fly in this ointment is that Titanic didn't live long enough for any truely signifigent changes to be made. The dog kennel may or may not have been relocated but if it was, it was a jerry rigged modification done on the fly. There just wasn't time for any really major changes to be made.
 
M

Matt Pereira

Guest
There wouldnt have been time for changes I seen a video that is of the Titanic in February 1912 but the date that was shown which appeared vintage of 1912 when they were promoting the ship dated it April 2, 1912 which is when she was leaving for Southampton.

The changes that were made to Titanic wouldnt be shown on Deck plans I remember some wheres that Jim found out there was something like 2 or 4 more columns in the D-Deck reception room than Olympic had.
 
G

George L. Lorton

Member
quote:

It's that English Class system, which for all intents, exists today.

That it does at that, Russell. There are remnants of the English Class System even in American Society. Of course here in the U.S. it's more about money. $$$ talks. In Britain this was true to some extent but family and background also played a role in how a person was regarded.​
 
Top