Samuel Ward Stanton's Cabin


Jan 12, 2020
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Doing some research on this man for a friend, and he's been trying to figure out their cabin, but he only has their ticket number. Is there a way to track down what Cabin he was assigned to, either via survivor testimony or ticket tracking, or is it one of those "we will never know" situations?
 

Arun Vajpey

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AFAIK, there is no official information available for cabin allocation of second and third class passengers. The only way to know would have been if Stanton's cabin mate survived and mentioned him and their cabin number. But with so few male survivors from second class, it is a long shot.

One of the more interesting passengers of the Titanic, Samuel Stanton was probably the only professional artist on board.
 
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Jan 12, 2020
40
10
38
youtube.com
AFAIK, there is no official information available for cabin allocation of second and third class passengers. The only way to know would have been if Stanton's cabin mate survived and mentioned him and their cabin number. But with so few male survivors from second class, it is a long shot.

One of the more interesting passengers of the Titanic, Samuel Stanton was probably the only professional artist on board.
Do we know his cabinmate or if he had one?
 

Arun Vajpey

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Update: No luck. The only two Titanic works that I found Samuel Stanton even mentioned are:

In the "Cherbourg" chapter of Titanic: Triumph and Tragedy the fact that he was a mural and marine artist of some note and boarded at the French port is mentioned.

The other book is Titanic by Leo Mariott where there is just a passing mention about his boarding ship.

So far I have not come across any survivor account that mentions Stanton by name, but there might be one or two somewhere. Considering that he was more interesting than the likes of William Stead or Jacques Futrelle, I find this omission rather surprising. perhaps it was a sign of the times: Stanton was travelling in Second-Class whereas those other two were in first.
 

Cam Houseman

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AFAIK, there is no official information available for cabin allocation of second and third class passengers. The only way to know would have been if Stanton's cabin mate survived and mentioned him and their cabin number. But with so few male survivors from second class, it is a long shot.

One of the more interesting passengers of the Titanic, Samuel Stanton was probably the only professional artist on board.
weird! Then how do we know Lawrence Beesely held D-54 ( think that's the one) or Francis Parkes held E-73 with three other Guarantee Gang members?
 

Arun Vajpey

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Then how do we know Lawrence Beesely held D-54 ( think that's the one) or Francis Parkes held E-73 with three other Guarantee Gang members?
With Lawrence Beesley, the answer is easy. He survived and so would have known his cabin number.

Of course, Francis Parkes died in the sinking. IF Cabin E-73 was what people believed that he was in, that might be a conjecture based on the probability that certain rooms were reserved for the members of the Guarantee Group.
 
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Cam Houseman

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With Lawrence Beesley, the answer is easy. He survived and so would have known his cabin number.

Of course, Francis Parkes died in the sinking. IF Cabin E-73 was what people believed that he was in, that might be a conjecture based on the probability that certain rooms were reserved for the members of the Guarantee Group.
Alrighty, that's fair yeah. But no cabins were ever reserved for the Guarantee Gang on either Titanic or Olympic.
 

Arun Vajpey

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But no cabins were ever reserved for the Guarantee Gang on either Titanic or Olympic.
That still allows two possibilities.

One of the Delivery Trip people who got off at Southampton - Wilding, Carruthers, Sanderson or Thompson - could have noticed the cabin numbers the continuing GG colleagues were using and put the information on record.

One or more of the Cross-Channnel passengers might have spoken to a member of the GG and got that information. After all, a cabin number is not a state secret.
 
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Cam Houseman

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That still allows two possibilities.

One of the Delivery Trip people who got off at Southampton - Wilding, Carruthers, Sanderson or Thompson - could have noticed the cabin numbers the continuing GG colleagues were using and put the information on record.

One or more of the Cross-Channnel passengers might have spoken to a member of the GG and got that information. After all, a cabin number is not a state secret.
Good Idea! Lol, it wasn't a state secret. Francis Carruthers was the Board of Trade man who oversaw her Sea Trials, right?
 

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