Saved from the Titanic film

May 12, 2005
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Sarah,

Kyrila gives a good sumary of the plot for "Saved From the Titanic" (thanks Kyrila). Whether there were lifeboat scenes is anybody's guess until a print of the movie turns up. However, press descriptions indicate the sinking was recreated, which may or may not mean that lifeboats were simulated. In the New York Daily Telegraph (28 April 1912) it was reported that "a miniature vessel" was made as well as "a studio-built ocean and iceberg, effecting a clear reproduction of the terrible affair." The same article lists other depicted scenes as including "the wireless room, the sinking of the great ocean ship, a United States battleship, the rescue and the terrible effects." (A fictional Navy ship apparently stood in for the Carpathia)

The mention of the "rescue" and "terrible effects" seem to imply lifeboat sequences of some sort. In addition, Moving Picture World (11 May 1912) referred vaguely to "mechanical and vision pictures," which likely were sinking and rescue scenes. Moving Picture News (also 11 May 1912) similarly referenced "wonderful mechanical and lighting effects."

Although "Finding Dorothy" may have a second printing in future, right now it's unavailable. But other writers have done excellent work, and their studies should be consulted. I would suggest readers interested in Dorothy Gibson and "Saved From the Titanic" get the following great books: "Lost Films" by Frank Thompson, "The Titanic and Silent Cinema" by Stephen Bottomore, and "The Titanic in Pictures" by Simon Mills. Don Lynch in the "Titanic Commutator" (THS), John Eaton in "Voyage" (TIS), and Phillip Gowan/Brian Meister in "Atlantic Daily Bulletin" (BTS) have also written important articles on Dorothy Gibson that helped inspire my book.

Randy
 
May 27, 2007
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Hello Randy and all,

quote:

"Lost Films" by Frank Thompson,
I've heard of this one but never read it! Do you know how popular "Saved From The Titanic" was at the time of it's release? I've heard it was thought to be exploitive by some. I didn't know you wrote a book on Dororthy Gibson! I've always been intrested in Silent Film! I saw Cecil B DeMille's "The Cheat" 1915 the Sunday before last!​
 
May 27, 2007
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Yes we should Kyrila! I agree with Kyrila, that's is an neat clip, Lana! Thanks for sharing. It's a pity that they couldn't hit on a cheap affordable process to color film earlier! Then I could of watched my silents in color! I'm still waiting to see "Toll Of The Sea" 1922! Seems I'm not the only one either!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toll_of_the_Sea
 
May 12, 2005
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George: "Do you know how popular "Saved From The Titanic" was at the time of it's release?"

Hi, George, the film was very popular. Next to Dorothy Gibson's first starring role in "Hands Across the Sea" (1911), it was the most publicized. Actually, judging by the number of "Saved From the Titanic" ads appearing even in small-town newspapers, it was likely more popular. Movie magazines carried lots of hoopla about it, not all of which can be relied on as Eclair, the studio Dorothy worked for, was an advertiser in most of them. But I think it's safe to say it was very successful, and not just in the US but in England and France.

George: "I've heard it was thought to be exploitive by some."

You are right that there was concern in the press during production that the film would be exploitive but it didn't receive any criticism along those lines. The opposite in fact. The New York Daily Telegraph (28 April 1912) reported that care was being taken by Eclair that "Saved From the Titanic" would not "offend the sensibilities of the public, which still feels the terrible bitterness of the accident." Moving Picture News (11 May 1912) also pointed out that the "harassing details that might offend good taste are carefully omitted, but the story of the wreck, the love interest, and the effects of the calamity are all depicted."

Eclair had Dorothy write the scenario so in that sense it was authentic, at least regarding the basic facts of her escape and rescue. In retrospect was "Saved" exploitive? A case could be made that it was, but the star wanted to do it, and the film's popularity proves it fulfilled a widespread public desire for more information on the tragedy. Finally, Dorothy didn't use it, as she could have, to further her career in the industry. "Saved" was her next to last film. She considered producer Jules Brulatour to be her real prize, and it was her misfortune that she chose to pursue her affair with him instead of continuing in motion pictures.

Randy
 
May 27, 2007
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Hi Randy!

Well "Saved From the Titanic" doesn't sound exploitative from the plot! Pretty cut and dried really to me from that plot and what you've told me! Eclair Studios sounds familiar from somewhere! Wait a minute!!! Didn't Evelyn Nesbit made a movie with them?? I just read a book on her Called "American Eve: Evelyn Nesbit, Stanford White: The Birth of the "It" Girl and the Crime of the Century" by Paula Uruburu! I to rack my memory!

http://www.amazon.com/American-Eve-Evelyn-Stanford-Century/dp/1594489939

I wonder if any of Eclair's other movies are known today! A lot of early studios made movies and are gone with the wind unfortunately. All that remains are pay stubs and records and film cans with dust in them or a rubbery gook!

Regarding Miss Dorothy it's a pity she decided on setting her cap on Mr. Jules! He must of had or represented something she wanted out of life! I'll have to read your book on her to see!
happy.gif
Reading about Sisi the Forgotten Empress Of Austria!
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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Hey, George. Since he is one of your Facebook contacts, might I suggest that you contact Phil Gowan ASAP? Most of what has subsequently been written about Dorothy derives from his original article, and he has been exceptionally generous in sharing his research... all documented, every last relevant photocopy, article,letter and email... with serious-minded persons who take the time to ask. You'll be glad you did!
 
May 27, 2007
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Thank you Jim for the advice! Yes, Phil Gowan is a great researcher and I am glad to have him as a friend on Facebook! I was already thinking about getting in touch with him already after I saw Randy paying tribute to Phil and saying how Phil inspired him and telling fellow ET'ers to consult Phil's Article in an earlier post. Perhaps I will after reading Randy's book! Phil's a busy fella and I'd feel bad about bugging him with no real specific questions. I really don't know that much about Dorothy.

Also I'm lucky to have "Finding Dorothy" on hold from the Library and am looking forward to reading it, Randy!

I'm very lucky to have met and know some intelligent and courteous people here on ET to help me with my study of history! I hope too be able to research more about things that interest me while in Columbia and keep up with everything! But in case this isn't possible at least I know I got to thank the people who's kindness has made my stay here at ET fun and informative and more then made up for the few backbiters I've had the misfortune to ran across!
 
May 27, 2007
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Continuing...
quote:

with serious-minded persons who take the time to ask.
Now that isn't me, Jim! Enthusiastic and liberal minded person that I am! Although I can get serious on folks getting the short end of the stick historically as you know from discussions we've had in the past! I will miss them! Actually I miss them already but perhaps it's for the best when folks can't agree that they agree to disagree and here's a thought! Respect one an other's opinion!

I also take comfort in knowing that even if I can't get on to ET at least my innovative Topics will go on!

quote:

Free Love, Kept Men and Women plus other naughty behavior and sordid happenings in the Gilded Age and beyond.

Spanish Influenza Worldwide Outbreak 1918

The Jazz Age or All Roads Lead To Ballyhoo

When Christ and his saints slept. The 1120 sinking of the White Ship. and its effect on English History

How would you escape and survive the Lusitania.
And some more that I can't remember! Plus I'll have the memory of the great discussions I've had! I know and have the satisfaction of knowing that I've contributed something to ET!

Sorry to go off topic and it's such a fascinating topic too! I hope to have more to contribute after reading Finding Dorothy and other info on Dorothy Gibson!​
 

derek byrne

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Oct 4, 2017
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I am writing a book about the connections between Titanic and the city of Dundee in Scotland. I am trying to find out if the film "Saved from the Titanic" (UK title "A Survivor of the Titanic") was shown in Scotland and specifically in Dundee. I can find no mention of it playing in a Scottish Theatre/Cinema in any of the newpapers of that time. Any info would be appreciated.