Schwieger's Log


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Jun 10, 1999
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G' Evening:

Upon consoltation of a copyright expert, whereupon I learned of so many shades of grey.
I offer the following...

Extract from April 1 1920 Mid-Week Pictorial -

Preceding Schwieger's entry is - Of special interest to American readers is the story of the Lusitania sinking, which sent a thrill of horror through the civilized world and the beginning of the train of events that brought the United States into the war.

Schweiger's entries began at 2:05 with his spotting of a four funneled steamer.

Moving ahead to...

"3:10. Clean bow shot from 700 meters range. (G torpedo, three meters depth adjustment,) cutting angle 90 degrees. Estimated speed 22 sea miles. Shot hits starboard side right behind bridge. An unusual heavy detonation follows with a very strong explosion cloud. (High in air over first smokestack.) Added to the explosion of the torpedo, there must have been a second explosion. (Boiler or coal powder.) The superstructure over point struck and high bridge are rent asunder, fire breaks out, and smoke envelopes the high bridge. The ship stops immediately and quickly heals to starboard, at same time diving deeper at the bow. She has the appearance of being about to capsize. Great confusion on board, boats being cleared and part being lowered into water. They must have lost their heads. Many boats crowded come down bow first or stern first in the water and immediately fill and sink. Fewer lifeboats can be made clear on the port side owing to the slant of the boat. The ship blows off, in front apppears the name Lusitania in gold letters. The stacks were painted black, no stern flag was up. She was running at a speed of twenty sea miles."
"3:25 P.M. It seems as if the vessel will be afloat only a short time. Submerge to 24 meters and go to sea. I could not have fired a second torpedo into this throng of humanity attempting to save themselves."
"4:15 P.M. Go to 11 meters and take a look around. In the distance astern are drifting a number of lifeboats. Of the Lusitania nothing is to be seen. The wreck must lie off Old Head of Kinsale Lighthouse, in 358 degrees R. W., fourteen sea miles in 90 meters of water, (27 miles from Queenstown,) 51 degrees, 22.6 N. and 8.32 W. The shore and lighthouse are clearly seen."

END exact translation.

Copyright Underwood & Underwood, shared by...

Michael A. Cundiff
USA
This day 3 Dec. 2003
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Jun 10, 1999
1,284
21
313
ADDENDUM - Owing to my 30 min. limited use of our Public Library in the evenings (And my 70wpm
keyboard skills waned since I severed my left pinky in '92 :-(

I was forced to begin Schwiegers log entries at
3:10. So here are his 2:00. 2:05. and 2:50 entries. Exact translation as follows...

2:00p.m. "Right ahead appear four funnels and two masts of a steamer with course vertical to us. (She steered from S.S.W., coming toward Galley Head.) Ship is made out to be a large passenger steamer.

2:05. Submerged to 11 meters and traveled with high speed on course converging toward steamer, hoping she would change course to starboard along Irish course.

"2:50. The steamer turns starboard, directs her course toward Queenstown, and makes possible an approach for a shot. Ran high speed until 3: P.M. in order to gain position directly ahead.

End extract. Copyright Underwood & Underwood. Shared by Michael A. Cundiff.

P.S. I just find the log fascinating!! WAR...this hungry beast devoured the beautiful LUSITANIA, and many a prominate life.
 
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