Scotland Road


Dave Gittins

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Mar 16, 2000
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Pure sarcasm. Scotland Road was a seedy street in (I think) Liverpool. Plenty of floosies and drunken sailors.

BTW, do you know that the term hijack is from just such a street? The streetwalkers used to call out to the sailors, "Hi Jack!". Then they'd take them off to a den of iniquity where they were robbed. Oh, the romance of the sea!
 
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David Haisman

Guest
Hi everyone,
I thought you might enjoy this little 'snippet' of information.
Whilst representing my mother at the Titanic Exhibition here in Brisbane, I was approached by a middle aged woman at my table. Pointing at a huge picture behind me of my mother she said, ''Who's that woman?'' I replied, ''Thats my mother.'' Her eyes widened and turning, shouted across the exhibition hall to her friend, ''Hey Julie! and again pointing at the picture shouted. ''That's his Old Woman!'' Her friend looking in our direction shouted back, ''He must be bloody old then!'' Trying to keep a straight face I emphasised that it was my mother. The first woman then said, ''Did she survive then?'' By then I had a job to control my laughter by adding, '' I sincerely hope so''

Best wishes David Haisman.
 
Sep 12, 2000
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Dear David,

It is so great to see you here and to see this posting. You have so many things to share with us. I do hope that others will encourage you to write a little article and post it for Phil Hind regarding the position of Look Out.

David and I have written to each other and he served as look out on White Star ships for many years. I think that many of the technical folks here would be very interested in an article about that.

Glad to see you here David.

Enjoy your day kind sir!
Maureen.
 
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David Haisman

Guest
Hi everyone,
To pick up on 'Scotland Road' the name given to the working alleyway on the Titanic, the name had changed to the 'Burma Road' on the 'Mary' and the'Lizzie'for this busy artery onboard these great ships. Many people find it hard to believe that the Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth were almost twice the size of the Titanic with a service speed of 28 knots and a crew capacity of almost 1500. The working alleyways , situated along the port side were at least 12 feet wide(4metres) and ran the full length of the ship. Throughout the entire length were laundries, linen stores, plate rooms, silver rooms, Kosher galleys, crew galleys,various mess rooms,several entrances to the engine rooms and generally most departmental stores relating to the running of the ship. No doubt the 'Scotland Road' of the Titanic was as equally as busy as onboard these leviathans. Right aft on these ships was the crew recreation area known as the 'Pig and Whistle' a name given to the crew's pub on all British ships. Throughout the whole length of the 'Burma Road'were watertight doors operated from the bridge during ice routine situations. These were of the sliding door type and not the guillotine operated doors used on some other vessels. The doors were operated manually by holding a handle over as a warning bell sounded and once let go, the door would start to close again. During this routine, all ports and deadlights from the lowest decks to the main deck were closed and regulalrly inspected by the Master At Arms to ensure this was adhered to.
At the forward end of the 'Burma Road'before reaching the crews accommodation,there was a cross alleyway with the sloping base of the foremast. An oval shaped steel door here was the entrance to the crows nest by way of an iron rung ladder running right up inside to the crows nest. Lookout Men would rattle the rungs of the ladder with a shackle to let the Lookout up in the 'nest' know that he was on his way up.
I hope this may have been of interest to those not accustomed to shipboard routine and will hopefully give a bit of an insight on the way these great liners operated below decks.
All the best, David Haisman
 
Sep 12, 2000
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Dear David,

Thanks so much for sharing this. It is exciting to have a real lookout here on the board. Especially a man who served White Star and had relatives aboard the Titanic.

One thing that I had not known before was that the pole was steel and was hollow and went down into the ship. I had only thought of a pole going into the top deck. But these men actually entered the pole below deck, isn;t that right?

But one thing that I would like to know is were "general quarters" sounded during the time that Titanic would have sailed. And if it would have been sounded, what would have been the proper procedures for a lookout during general quarters.

1) if he were off and in the crew dining area?
2) if he were off and in his bed?
3) in the crows nest?

Hope these are not so simple that they are a waste of your time, but it would be interesting to know this stuff.

Thanks David!

Maureen.
 

Philip Hind

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Sep 1, 1996
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Can I remind people to try and keep their posts to the right topic. This topic and thread is specifically about the message board. It makes it much easier to follow a discussion or locate it later on if you post to a relevant thread.
 
Sep 12, 2000
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Sorry Phil.

David, I want to continue this discussion, but Phil Hind is correct. We need to stay on topic. This section is a place to post things specifically about the message board. But there is a section on this board called CREW RESEARCH FORUM that contains a thread started by Senan Molony entitled WHO LOOKED OUT FOR THE LOOKOUTS.

This thread contains some hardcore stuff about the Titanic Lookouts, but subsequent messages have been posted regarding questions about the typical lookout training.

Please consider meeting some really great people there and discuss this same stuff there.

Thanks David see you on theother thread. And thanks to Phil for the gentle reminder.

Maureen.
 
Dec 13, 1999
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There must be some expert amongst us who can say for certain why a certain crew area was nicknamed "Scotland Road". I believe it to be called thus after Liverpool's Scotland Road (still here today 'tho very much changed) and a den of iniquity even nowadays!
However, I've also heard claims that it was so called because of the large number of Scottish crew members who congregated in that area of the ships - remember that this term was used not only for Titanic. Perhaps someone with a sea-going history, and not a rank landlubber like I am, would know the answer?
 

Dave Gittins

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Mar 16, 2000
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I think your first idea is correct. Seamen sometimes had a fanciful sense of humour. On some ships a major corridor was called Burma Road, though it wasn't filled with Burmese.
 

Pat Cook

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Apr 26, 2000
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Just think - if this was the area where the crew went for a smoke, they could've called it "Tobacco Road" (You have to be an old American to appreciate that one).
Or for stowaways to hide out - "Hit the Road".
Or to take a nip - "One for the Road".

I'm no help, am I? Actually, and I cannot for the life of me remember where I had heard this, I recall reading that, back then, a shortcut was referred to as a 'Scotland Road', somewhat along the lines of Dutch doors, Spanish moss and French kissing...wait, that's something else.

I'm still no help, right?

yr hmbl nd obdnt,
Cook
 

Dave Gittins

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Mar 16, 2000
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Afraid not. Most of the crew came from around Southampton. They would have known Scotland Road from the time when White Star operated out of Liverpool.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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'Scottie Road' in Liverpool was a great place for a pub crawl in 1912 - it had 65! But apart from gang warfare it was famous as the hub of the immigrant communities (especially Italian), so it was a very appropriate name for a 3rd Class thoroughfare.
 

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