Sea Diamond


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Jun 12, 2004
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It appears as if the captain, 1st and 2nd mates, Chief Steward and others were arrested and charged for negligence in this matter. What does everyone think of this? An investigation is being conducted into the matter, but supposedly the Ministry believes that fault lay on the shoulders of the captain and a few other crew members.

Also, testimony suggests that, during the sinking, no help to [most of] the passengers came from the crew.

Anyway, being on a sinking liner, as many of us know, can be quite . . . scary!

By the way, hi, Mike (Standart). I hope all is well.

Mark
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>By the way, hi, Mike (Standart). I hope all is well.<<

Still breathing.
wink.gif


We've been following this story in the Maritime Casualties thread so I may be rehashing some old ground here. I'll note that the accident happened in calm seas with clear weather in a well charted area so barring evidence of some sort of mechanical failure, the Captain and his officers are going to be in for a very rough ride. They're looking at up to five years in prison and there's a potential for more of the two still missing turn up dead. Manslaughter doesn't go over very well with the Greek authorities.

At the moment, you're looking at the usual confusion along with the blizzard of accusations and counter-accusations which follow in the wake of these events. They range from a crew that didn't do it's job, to allagations that the ship herself was actually in poor shape, the snazzy paint job notwithstanding.

What the investigation will turn up is anybody's guess, (Some of it might even be accurate) so all I can say is "Stay tuned for further developments." It may fade from the news but the courts will be playing with this for a long time to come.
 
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Thanks for letting me know about the other thread, Mike. I'll take a look.

It's interesting what made the Ministry decide to lay charges on these particular officers. Such an authority isn't likely to be one to go [solely] on hearsay or others' claims. There must have been some damn provocative reason that these charges were made. Would the Ministry have merely assumed officer negligence in light of the calm weather? As you've said, that's anybody's guess. These motives alone do make for an intriguing story, though.

All that we can really hope for is that the actual cause of the sinking is ascertained and that justice is served based on that.
 
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By the way, Mike, can't seem to find that Maritime Casualties thread. Obviously looking in the wrong places. Can you put it here for me?

Thanks again!
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>Would the Ministry have merely assumed officer negligence in light of the calm weather?<<

And in a well charted and marked shipping channel too. In light of that, it's hardly a brain strainer to figure out that somebody screwed the pooch on this one. As the Captain is the one with the ultimate authority and responsibility for the ship's operation and safety, he's a natural as a target, as is anybody on the navigation team who was on watch.

Where this is going to go is anybody's guess. The battle lines have already been drawn and there's a lot in the way of interested parties who are playing the usual games of going to the "Court of Public Opinion." This affair is only now just starting to drop out of the news but the lawyers are going to be busy for years to come.
 
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Thanks for the link, Paul. It's appreciated. By the way, I know it's been two years, but I apologize for our to-do at that time. I have had quite a bit of time to mellow. I want to get along with everybody. Not sure whether or not you remember that, but I thought I'd mention it anyway.

Mike: The captain's role is probably the most ironic: s/he's the highest (most powerful) authority on the ship, and yet s/he is in the most precarious position of all. In a way, that [at least partially] explains why s/he is held negligible regardless of the specific cause.

I am curious to see what happens.
 

Paul Rogers

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Blimey, Mark, that's all in the past and long forgotten! Thanks for the apology but, take it from me: there's no hard feelings at all and no need to apologise.

It's nice to see you back.
 
Mar 28, 2002
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Evening all,

Some old names on here! Haven't posted in a while.

I heard the Sea Diamond was an ex-ferry but I can't substantiate this. The old top heavy theory came to mind when I saw it listing.

I take it they haven't recovered the bodies of the two missing French passengers yet?

Cheers,

Boz
 
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Thanks, Paul. It's great to be back. I stop in every now and then to see what's going on. As expected, there's always something interesting at large in these forums.

Especially in April! That very important day is about to arrive. It'll be 95 years!

Hey, Boz! It's been a long time! I hope all is well with you.

As for the missing Frenchmen, I read at the link above that the chance of structural collapse is too much of a threat to divers who would retrieve the lost, so supposedly the bodies, wherever they lay, would be left alone, at least for now. This, presumably, is considered negligible. I would be curious to know if Search-and-Recovery will ever consider going after them before the ship sinks too low.
 
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No, but the location of their cabin near the tear does add indication as to what possibly happened to them. Perhaps, because of their close proximity to the damage, they might have been overcome by flooding water early on, depending on whether or not they were in or near their cabin at the time of impact. If it means anything, the fact that the ship is upside down makes access to their cabin easier, since it's "near the top," so-to-speak. But was their cabin an inside cabin or outside cabin? And was it closer to the bow or the stern?

By the way, which end of the ship is farthest underwater?

Regardless, the leaking will tend to obstruct visualization for dive teams.

Probably no chance that they might still be alive--too much time has passed. I do hope that rescue teams are able to retrieve the bodies before the ship slips farther under, if it will indeed do so. However, I realize that it's a step-by-step process--first things first.
 
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>>By the way, which end of the ship is farthest underwater? <<

The stern from the looks of the last photo I saw, but things may have changed since then as the wreck settles. It's deep enough that an unmanned submersible is being used to look things over.

I have no idea where the cabin of the two missing people is located but I strongly doubt that they're still alive. If they were, you would think they would have contacted their family by now, and the silence out there is a screamer!
 
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Silence is louder after devastation than the screaming that had occurred during it . . . although it quite often seems.

Still, it would be nice, when the right time comes, to retrieve the bodies. The alternative is unthinkable.
 
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