Seacocks on ShipsA few questions


Status
Not open for further replies.

Daniel Cox

Member
Apr 5, 2004
95
0
156
Hi.........Ive always wondered about the seacocks on ships.
# How did they work?
# Could vandels open them?
# Are modern day liners (QM2) still have them?
# Are there any pics on what they look like?

Just curious after reading how the Normandie could of been saved if her seacocks were opened to let settle at the dock.Thanks for any feed back........Dan
 

Noel F. Jones

Member
May 14, 2002
857
4
183
"Seacocks" are a figment of fiction writers' fertile imaginations.

The trick is to keep the sea out - not let the bloody stuff in! There are no faciliting fittings whereby a merchant ship may be scuttled (the Navy may have a different philosophy!).

In the unlikely event a ship needs to be scuttled the only way to do it short of punching holes in the plating would be to wreck the pipework whereby seawater is normally taken in to service condensers, cooling jackets, ballast tanks, sanitary water circuits etc. Rest assured, the circuitry is otherwise strictly failsafe.

Interestingly, it is possible to replenish fresh water tanks via the ballast lines on a contingency basis. We used to do this in the Tapajos, a clearwater tributary of the Amazon.

Noel
 
Jul 9, 2000
58,624
763
563
Easley South Carolina
>>There are no faciliting fittings whereby a merchant ship may be scuttled (the Navy may have a different philosophy!). <<

Maybe, but not that I've ever seen in my service. If it became nesseccery to scuttle a ship, the job would be done by having a cruiser or destroyer fire torpedos into the hulk. This was generally the court of last resort since it was preferable to salvage and refit the vessel whenever possible.
 

Noel F. Jones

Member
May 14, 2002
857
4
183
Michael:

It occurred to me that there might be provided facilities for scuttling warships so as to prevent capture and the risk of security classified equipment etc. fall into the hands of an enemy - hence my parenthesised proviso.

Noel
 

Andrew Fanner

Member
Nov 5, 2003
36
0
156
IIRC some German warships had a specifically designed facility whereby purpose made scuttling charges could be fitted to all intakes/outlets on the hull. In the event of possible capture the charges would ensure that the ship sank, any additional wrecking required being the responsibility of the crew. This was to prevent a repeat performance of the ignominy of the internment of the High Seas Fleet in Scapa Flow.

Certainly done with Graf Spee and probably (if pointlessly) with Bismarck. Other scuttled vessels, eg Scheer, Gneisenau, had dockyard facilities at hand and may have used those instead.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Similar threads

Similar threads