Search for John Paul Jonesb Bonhomme Richard


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NOAA Approves Grant to Aid Search for John Paul Jones' Flagship
Story Number: NNS060208-06
Release Date: 2/8/2006 2:37:00 PM



From Naval Historical Center Public Affairs

GROTON, Conn. (NNS) -- The Naval Historical Center’s (NHC) search for Revolutionary War naval hero John Paul Jones' ship Bonhomme Richard received further support in early February, when it was recommended for funding through the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Office of Ocean Exploration's competitive grant process.

The NHC and Ocean Technology Foundation (OTF) plan to launch a search for Bonhomme Richard off the coast of England in July.

For the rest of the story, go to http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=22218
 
From The Navy Newsstand
quote:

By Lt. j.g. Emelia Spencer, USS John Paul Jones Public Affairs

GROTON, Conn. (NNS) -- The multipurpose amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) and guided-missile destroyer USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53) were named honorary flagships March 13 for the upcoming search for the remains of the original Bonhomme Richard, which sank in the North Sea in 1779.
After two and a quarter centuries, it would be quite a feat to find the remains of the Bon Homme Richard. I wish them the best.
 
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Jeannine Kleinschmidt

Guest
I just stumbled upon this thread, and this is such exciting news, Michael! I haven't gone into all the articles about it yet, but just imagine the historical significance it would be if this gem of a ship could be found! Living just 15 miles west of Annapolis, Md., I spend a lot of time there, and it always gives me chills of awe to visit John Paul Jones' crypt beneath the Naval Academy Chapel, or to view his portrait at the museum. I am excited! Thanks for sharing this news with us!

Also wanted to reply to the post about the USS Franklin on the 'Introduce Yourself' thread from yesterday. You said the survivors you met had unpleasant memories of that attack. I know that my Dad lost one of his best buddies in it, name of George Saunders. I have photos taken of the two of them together in their crackerjack uniforms. It is so sad, because it happened so close to the end of the fighting...Losing George and survivor's guilt, I think, are what haunted Dad the most. George's name is inscribed on the Maryland WWII Memorial, which sits facing the U.S. Naval Academy on Rt. 2. The closest thing to danger my Dad had during the war, was almost getting roasted alive in a hanger fire, but thankfully, he escaped that one, too.

You served on several Navy ships, yourself. What was your job aboard? I wanted to join the Navy myself, after high school, but being a girl, was discouraged from that track.
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Sorry if I'm not posting this on the correct thread--still feeling my way around here.

Cheers!
Jeannine
 
Interesting stuff about Jones' old command. Yes, that crypt is a somber and magnificent place. Growing up in Glen Burnie most of my younger life, we girls went down to the Academy every weekend for the mixers in Dahlgren Hall, and a stop at the crypt was on every mid's agenda. I ended up having a June Week wedding,- my now retired Capt. was class of '72. I wonder if Eternal Father Strong to Save is still sung every Sunday at Chapel? I remember thinking of Titanic when those glorious voices got to the "for those in peril on the sea" part of the text. This was before the school went co-ed. And those were the days when chapel was mandatory. So much has changed there in the past three decades. It is such awe-inspiring campus to visit.
 
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Jeannine Kleinschmidt

Guest
Wow, Shelley, you and I were practically neighbors! My mom's zip is still G.B. I went to Andover High. My cousin, Patricia (Pat) married a middie at the chapel in an all-out full formal wedding, going under the crossed swords, the whole bit. I attended with my family. I think I was about 5 at the time, which would have been somewhere around 1963 or so. Sadly, her husband, a Lt. Colonel, was lost at sea when the jet fighter he was flying in formation suddenly took a nosedive into the Pacific. They were never able to find out why. Her younger sister married a middie who didn't finish at the NA. My older sister met and dated a middie and did all the cool June Week stuff, but they eventually parted ways. I always wanted to attend those mixers but was forbidden.

Don't you just love the chapel and those gorgeous grounds? Its not the open campus it once was, however. Esp. since 9/11. And not to be sexist or anything, but I still preferred it when it was men only and with all of the old traditions like you mentioned.

Cheers!
Jeannine
 
I don't have the direct connections that you two do, but the Naval Academy/Annapolis/and Maryland in general is one of my all-time favorite places to go! John and I try to visit the Chesapeake Bay area whenever we can (hopefully, we will this summer!). We've been to Glen Burnie many times. I have a lot of great childhood memories of visiting my aunt and uncle (the same aunt who sailed on the Normandie in the '30s) at their home in Towson.

Denise
 
>>You served on several Navy ships, yourself. What was your job aboard?<<

My rating was as a ship's serviceman, and a lot of the jobs there would be under a storekeepers rating in most other navies. We're the guys who run the ship's store as well as the laundry, dry cleaning, tailor and barbershop. (The sheer veriaty of jobs required to keep a warship going and the crew happy is breathtaking. The Ship's Servicemen are sometimes called "The Morale People")

Of course, like any sailor in a deck rating, I was expected to know and understand the fundementals of deck seamanship and damage control as well as underway watchstanding. One of my collateral duties on most of the ships I served aboard was as a lookout for low visibility operations. That's where I learned some tough lessons about what Fleet and Lee had to deal with on their lonely and bone chilling watch.

>>I wanted to join the Navy myself, after high school, but being a girl, was discouraged from that track.<<

It still happens a bit but none of the discouraging comes from the Navy. I think you mentioned having a daughter in your intro thread. (Apologies if I have you confused with somebody else.) If at some point she wants to join, the Navy will be happy to sign her on if she meets the qualifications for enlistment or commissioning.

>>Sorry if I'm not posting this on the correct thread--still feeling my way around here.<<

If you have questions about the Navy, feel free to ask. I don't know it all...don't pretend to...but I can point you to useful resources to cover my gaps.

Getting back to the search for the Bon Homme Richard, I think they're going to have one tough go at it. It can be done but the ship by now has to have decomposed to fragments.
 
I ran away from home at 17 and saw the Navy recruiter who took me to Baimbridge (now gone)to sign me up- thinking I was 18. When I heard my parents had to sign me up since I was underage I changed my mind. Then I tried again in 1973 when I got married, this time OCS in Newport, but my husband and I could not get duty together so after all the tests and physical- I changed my mind- again. I did put my sister in for radio school in San Juan back in the 80's. Now I am too old and the Navy doesn't want me- but my Dad was a Master Chief on aircraft carriers, three wars later, so the family has done its part for USN! And being a Navy wife should count for something!
 
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Jeannine Kleinschmidt

Guest
Of course being a Navy wife counts! Be very proud! Throughout history, we women have supported our men through all their endeavors, no matter how far-reaching. We kept the homefires burning and gave them a safe and welcoming place to return to. We make it possible for them to achieve greater success, I believe. Great pluck there, running away to try and join up! I would never have had the guts to do that.

>>It still happens a bit but none of the discouraging comes from the Navy.<<

True. It was my family who discouraged me. The old double-standard. They would have been so proud if the boys had joined up. But it worked out for the best, since my ambition was more of a romantic idea than anything else. The reality of being signed up to serve for 6 years, and belonging to the USN would have been more than I could have handled, I know. I am proud that I was able to serve my country after all in a civilian capacity. It made me very proud, especially when unfortunate events in the world took place, and I knew that even my small contribution was helping.

You're right, Michael I do have a daughter, well--two actually, and one son. Of the three (who are all adults now), my eldest had flirted with the idea of joining the Navy, but in the end she went into law enforcement instead. She's a lowly servant right now, but she's in that track and is very smart and ambitious. I have the highest hopes for her success--not to make me look good as her parent--but for herself. She can do anything she puts her mind to. Thanks for lending an ear.

Cheers!
Jeannine
 
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Jeannine Kleinschmidt

Guest
Denise, you are so cute! You sound like me the way that I go off about Savannah, GA (hence the username...). I do appreciate living here, however, and love Annapolis and the Naval Academy--just NOT the crowds, and parking is insane! My favorite restaurant there is Middleton's Tavern, do you know of it? Geo. Washington, Thos. Jefferson and Ben Franklin were known to have frequented there whenever they were in town. I do love my 'Oysters Annapolis!'

I hope you get to return here again and again. We locals may complain about the tourists in summertime, but you are the lifeblood to our merchants downtown, and in Baltimore and well, everywhere around. Now if they can just get the Bay healthy again...they're getting there, but its a long, hard road. A constant battle.

Also, I think when you love a place enough, it doesn't matter if you live there or are from there, you belong. Its a part of you. Even when you leave and go home, a part of you will always live here. I only know of a few places that mean as much to me. Enjoy your vacation, hope you can afford the gas if you're driving this summer...

Cheers!
Jeannine
 
>>And being a Navy wife should count for something<<

It counts for a lot in my book, Shelley and always has. A military wife has to deal with long seperations from loved ones who go to some godawful places with the knowladge that they might not come back! They also have to be a very resourceful lot in order to deal with stresses and responsibilities on the homefront that they might otherwise be able to share with the spouse. It takes a very special sort of person to be able to stick with that and somehow make the relationship work.

>>True. It was my family who discouraged me. The old double-standard.<<

Sorry to hear that. I'd like to say it doesn't exist anymore but we both know better then that.

>>I am proud that I was able to serve my country after all in a civilian capacity.<<

And that capacity was??? (If you don't mind my asking.)

>>She's a lowly servant right now,<<

Oh I don't think of law enforcement officers as being "lowly" anything.
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It's a tough and dangerous job where one has to deal with some real pieces of work on a daily basis in places no sane person would venture into for a trillion dollars! I have the greatest of respect for those who walk that thin blue line.
 

rob scott

Member
My daddy still wears his Annapolis ring, even though retired as a career navy officer, and two classmates of his were career US Marine officers, one a career pilot like he was; now retired from his second career with Northrop Aircraft and working (yes still!) in the hospitality field on a beaut of a coast shore somewhere (not only he has the 'type A driver type' gene but methinks Annapolis helped him become even more a workaholic!), I noticed his ring still there on his finger at our recent fam reunion for his milestone birthday, just as it was on there the day he took our family, when we lived back that way, to the campus and I stood there, a youngster, staring at the Skipper Jones crypt.
Today's Humour: being a youngster and contrary to popular mythos they really do not know everything, I became confused betwixt the US Navy skipper Jones I was staring at... and the things I'd heard and read of Davy Jones locker, and wondered how he could be in that crypt if he's supposed to be down in the wet with some locker to trap poor drowned souls.
;)
but then, today's kids can just watch the pirates of caribbean trilogy to understand about that jones and his locker :D
I really do hope they can get down enough, and sift enough, and make books and tv shows enough to show us something and help us learn more about the BHR fighting ship which carried our flag to French bases and all across the Atlantic attacking the British in Ireland and such.
:D
ps- who here does not yet know? he named that ship after dr Franklin's publication, as the French for a poor man is bon homme - poor Richard's almanac
 
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Jeannine Kleinschmidt

Guest
>>he named that ship after dr Franklin's publication<<

I did know that, but I'd forgotten, Scott! Thanks for the reminder. LOL I love your childhood quandary about DJL. Adorable! Yeah, my kids are really into the whole Pirates thing these days. POTC has done wonders to get the younger generations interested in tales of the sea. I loved pirate stories and tall ships as a kid, mainly from hearing about them from my Dad.

Speaking of your Dad's Navy ring--my mom had bought Dad one when he was in the USN, which he did wear at the time. These days, my older brother wears that same ring, even though he's retired from the Army. I think he had wanted to join the Navy back during the Vietnam conflict, but didn't want to commit for the 6 years. Not sure.

But I have always been a John Paul Jones fan. Have you ever seen the movie with Robert Stack? I think they should do a remake of it, that would be cool!

>>And that capacity was??? (If you don't mind my asking.)<<

Don't mind at all, Michael. I was a clerical for the DoD in the metro DC area--if you get my drift. Most people I met who worked there were from out of state. I was a lucky local who caught a break. With only a high-school education, it was the best I could do with myself, and it was a great job. I loved it! I only left because I couldn't handle the stress of trying to be a good mom and a good employee. Some women can juggle it and do great, like my best friend, and I salute them. But I lost one of my sitters, and nothing was more important to me at the time than raising them. Then I had another baby the next year, so essentially, I took away a salary, and added another mouth to feed. Things were really tight for a while, but I wouldn't change a thing if I had it to do over. I may be job hunting in another year or so. Just as soon as my granddaughter starts all-day kindergarten. That's how I fill my days right now, looking after her while her mom works shiftwork.

My daugther isn't an officer right now, but a police dispatcher, though she has hopes to get more involved in the law enforcement field in some capacity in the future. She loves all the crime shows, CSI and the like.

BTW, fascinating jobs you had on-board the carriers. It is so cool how they are so self-contained, like miniature floating cities. My hats off to you--you kept things running behind the scenes to make the missions possible. My cousin's girl was recently aboard the Abraham Lincoln when it was in the Persian Gulf. She got to meet the Pres when he came on board to welcome them home a few years ago. I think she's about to leave the service now, if she hasn't done so already.

Cheers!
Jeannine
 
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Jeannine Kleinschmidt

Guest
Sorry Rob, didn't mean to call you by your last name. Doh!
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>>My daugther isn't an officer right now, but a police dispatcher,<<

A strssful job in and of itself since you're the first one to hear of anything as it's going down. The only thing that can be tougher is to be out there with the officers who have to pick up the carnage of human stupidity and melevolance.
 
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Jeannine Kleinschmidt

Guest
Very true. She does see the occasional crack-pipes which are confiscated, and the precinct she works in is where the apartment was for the 9/11 terrorists before they carried out their horrendous agenda. Glad she was still going to school back then.

Cheers!
Jeannine
 
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