Served on Olympic (200+ voyages)


A

Aaron_2016

Guest
Fleet worked on the Olympic from 1920 until 1935 (including her final voyage). According to the crew manifests found on Ancestry.com he sailed on the Olympic at least 220 times as Able Seaman and Lookout. I always assumed a deal was done with the company to secure his discretion concerning the truth behind the Titanic disaster.


He can be found on 110 westbound crossings on the Olympic to New York from 1920 to 1935. The records do not show eastbound crossings, but one can assume he sailed the return journey each time as well, making a total of 220 crossings on the Olympic during those 15 years.

FleetOlympic.PNG



What is interesting is that his name has been crossed out in the below voyage in 1921. I understand the Olympic may been commanded by a different Captain around that time. I wonder if the Captain objected to Fleet being on the ship? e.g. "I don't care what the company said. Get off my ship!"


Fleet1921.PNG


He was back on the next voyage, so maybe the company had cautioned the new Captain and told him to let Fleet back on the ship again because they did a deal with him?

I noticed his profile is incorrect. This very website says: 'From June 1912, Fleet served briefly as Seaman on the White Star liner Olympic. (220 voyages spanning over 15 years is certainly not briefly). He found that White Star looked at the surviving officers and crew as embarrassing reminders of the recent disaster and he left the company in August 1912. (He left in 1935 when the Olympic went out of service). For the next 24 years Fleet sailed with Union-Castle and various other companies (Ancestry has no record of that, only the Olympic from 1920 to 1935), finishing with the sea in 1936. (Ancestry has no mention of him on any crew lists after April 1935 following the Olympic's retirement.)


I wonder why he chose to serve on that particular ship for the entire time and why he did not transfer to another ship after the Olympic retired?


.
 
A

Andrew Williams

Guest
The other side of the story turns on his brother-in-law Philip Le Gros. His was also employed on the Olympic, mostly in the twenties.
 
A

Aaron_2016

Guest
Thanks. I researched Philip LeGros on Ancestry and he appears on over 140 westbound voyages on the Olympic as a steward in the 1920's and 1930's. If he sailed on the return journeys then he might have made an incredible 280+ voyages on the Olympic. I wonder if he put in a good word for Fleet or vice versa, or perhaps they both found the Olympic to be a good reliable ship to serve on - hence her nickname 'The Old Reliable'.


.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
A

Andrew Williams

Guest
Difficult to say Aaron. I prefer the latter you quoted, possible case where Fleet recommended LeGros. Unfortunately we'll never know the full truth, although a nice thought to seriously think about. LeGros was formerly employed at Thornycrofts wayback in the day's I vividly remember when they became known as Vosper Thornycroft's and long before closure took place in Southampton moving all ship building operations down at Portsmouth. LeGros also served during World War One, so he saw a loads of bloody-battles and bloodshed. I managed to find a rare photo shot of him from a press cutting showing his group regiment, ready to face and undergo the horrors of warfare.
 

Similar threads