Ship Scuttling Videos


Oct 7, 2014
16
5
33
I am creating this thread to post Ship Scuttling/Sinking Videos in order to better understand the sinking of Titanic.

I believe these are important, because they give some context into the nature and fluid dynamics of sinking ships.

If you have any you would like to post, feel free.
All I ask is that the videos are:
A.) Actual Videos of the ship in question sinking (no CGI re-enactments)
B.) Scuttling Videos (no war footage)

I think If we are respectful about this, we can all gain better understanding of what an actual sinking ship is like in practice, instead of just in theory.

HMCS Annapolis
Info: HMCS Annapolis (DDH 265) - Wikipedia
Scuttling Video:

Stellar Banner
Info: The Stellar Banner is the largest non-military ship in history to be intentionally scuttled, at just over 1000' in Length. It was purposefully run aground by it's captain to prevent capsizing and spilling it's cargo after an equipment malfunction began causing an irreversible starboard list. It was then towed to deep water and intentionally scuttled. I will post more videos of it as I come across them, but I personally feel it is the most relevant example to Titanic in modern history in terms of size and initial damage. It sank 15 minutes after being released from its floatation rigging, much to the surprise of the marine demolition crew in charge. Due to this, only the last few minutes of the sinking was filmed.

Preliminary Videos:
Foundering in Shallow Water

Final Plunge *Explicit language warning*
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Stephen Carey

Member
Apr 25, 2016
171
93
93
Philippines
I am creating this thread to post Ship Scuttling/Sinking Videos in order to better understand the sinking of Titanic.

I believe these are important, because they give some context into the nature and fluid dynamics of sinking ships.

If you have any you would like to post, feel free.
All I ask is that the videos are:
A.) Actual Videos of the ship in question sinking (no CGI re-enactments)
B.) Scuttling Videos (no war footage)

I think If we are respectful about this, we can all gain better understanding of what an actual sinking ship is like in practice, instead of just in theory.

HMCS Annapolis
Info: HMCS Annapolis (DDH 265) - Wikipedia
Scuttling Video:

Stellar Banner
Info: The Stellar Banner is the largest non-military ship in history to be intentionally scuttled, at just over 1000' in Length. It was purposefully run aground by it's captain to prevent capsizing and spilling it's cargo after an equipment malfunction began causing an irreversible starboard list. It was then towed to deep water and intentionally scuttled. I will post more videos of it as I come across them, but I personally feel it is the most relevant example to Titanic in modern history in terms of size and initial damage. It sank 15 minutes after being released from its floatation rigging, much to the surprise of the marine demolition crew in charge. Due to this, only the last few minutes of the sinking was filmed.

Preliminary Videos:
Foundering in Shallow Water

Final Plunge *Explicit language warning*
This video does show how once the bow has gone under, the rest of the ship floods exponentially until she goes below the surface, dragged down by the increasing weight of the forward end and consequent loss of buoyancy. This is called "plunging by the head" and is more common than plunging by the stern. Derbyshire did the same, but wasn't scuttled.
The Banner's sister ship suffered the same cracking and sank with just about all hands. I imagine that Banner's Master was well aware of this and, as soon as his officers reported cracking and flooding in the holds when leaving port, he put her aground as fast as he could. A good response and "lucky" that it wasn't in open seas and bad weather like her sister.
The same class of ships have had cracking in similar places, though nothing much seems to have been done about it. This report was pre-Banner's sinking.
 

Bo Bowman

Member
Dec 23, 2019
76
58
48
Worland, Wyoming
Wow. To anyone who has been fascinated by seagoing things (as I have since childhood), watching these videos is hauntingly heartbreaking. Particularly the Stellar Banner, which sank as they were trying to save her. You want to shout "CUT THE CABLE!!!" to the tug as the big ship starts to go. And you understand the blast of the horn by the standby vessel, a final gesture honoring the loss of something that was almost human. Man's noblest effort is the design, construction, and sailing of a ship. It is a partnership with God, a fabrication of man designed to harness the forces of nature. Get it right, and you have a truly wonderful thing for a number of years. Get it wrong, and you have the gift of humility.

Thanks for sharing these. Great idea for a thread.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users
Nov 14, 2005
2,250
1,143
308
I debated about whether or not to post this as she was your ship but I figured you might have seen it before and besides she went to to good cause..an artificial reef. You can skip to the last five minutes to see the sinking with some interior shots. Ran across this looking for info on the sinking of the U.S.S America CV-66 but most of that is classified and hasn't been released. They wanted to see what it would take to sink a super carrier.
 

Bo Bowman

Member
Dec 23, 2019
76
58
48
Worland, Wyoming
Steven, thanks for posting this. I'd seen it years ago, but was game to see it again. An odd mix of emotions. As a once-upon-a-time waterborne person I feel certain emotions at the loss of any vessel. After all, I celebrate the fact that naval architecture lifts us above the angels - a creative gift that generates magnificent results. At the other end of the emotional spectrum, my three years aboard Oriskany did not seem to inspire the same muse. We did our jobs, and as one of the last Essex-class carriers she was nearly a relic of WWII. Her keel was laid in 1945, construction was stopped at the war's end, and then resumed in 1950. That means something.

Thanks for sharing this!
 

Bo Bowman

Member
Dec 23, 2019
76
58
48
Worland, Wyoming
Correction, Steven. I've never seen this lengthy documentary, only a 10-minute video. Thanks again for posting it. An odd feeling. My specialty at the time was Damage Control. and we worked our tails off to keep this thing from sinking or burning. How odd, to see how much effort went into making it sinkable!
 
Nov 14, 2005
2,250
1,143
308
Correction, Steven. I've never seen this lengthy documentary, only a 10-minute video. Thanks again for posting it. An odd feeling. My specialty at the time was Damage Control. and we worked our tails off to keep this thing from sinking or burning. How odd, to see how much effort went into making it sinkable!
I know what your saying. When my ship was dismantled there was a web site that documented it as it went on. Sad to see her go but they pretty much had to do it. She was contaminated beyond the point of cleaning up without tearing her apart. Her keel was laid during WW2 also but later was modernized with an angled deck. It took 4 weeks to sink the America as they were testing different weapons.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Similar threads

Similar threads