Shipbuilders


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Tripp Carter

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Dec 13, 1998
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I've heard this title referenced to many times after reading over some posts in several of the forums, I was wondering if you could shed a little light on this book/magazine for me. Thanks bunches
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Jul 9, 2000
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Tripp, The Shipbuilder was a trade magazine that was published at the time and included among other things the Special editions on the Olympic and Titanic which are likely the most detailed general descriptions of these ships you'll find from any source. This particular special has been reprinted several times, most notably in Ships Of the Past, Olympic and Titanic and also in the two volumn The Shipbuilder edited by Mark Warren.

The periodical still continues in publication today as Shipping World and Shipbuilder.
 

Tripp Carter

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Thanks for the clarification, Michael. Do you think they'd have any of the reprinted editions available at bookstores websites (ex. Amazon or Barnes & Noble) or would I need to snoop around E-bay to see what's available?
 
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Brian R Peterson

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Hi Tripp,

You may want to check Ebay for this, I have seen "Olympic & Titanic: Ocean Liners of the Past" there.

This is, as Michael mentioned an exact reprint of the 1911 issue of Shipbuilder devoted entirely to the two ships.

This book is a veritable wealth of knowledge on the Olympic Class ships chocked full of technical data and photos and drawings of many areas of the ship.

This book can also be found from time to time on Barnes & Noble or Amazon however they usually are steep in price.

Ebay auctions of the book usually end at or around $50 USD; I picked mine up for $42 which is more than I wanted to pay, but well worth the money.

I have had the privilege to view an original copy of the 1911 Shipbuilder at an auction once, it sold for an astronomical amount if memory serves me correct.

Best Regards,

Brian
 

Tripp Carter

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Dec 13, 1998
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That doesn't sound too bad. I'll have to look around and see what I can find. Thanks for the info, guys.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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As Brian indicated, you would have to snoop around eBay and more likely, any on-line used book shops. While not the easiest to get, it's not impossible. You might want to try for the Ocean Liners of the Past series as these seem to be the most common. There have been recent attempts to do a reprint of the actual souvenier edition of the Olympic class by THS, but the project was stillborn.
 

Tripp Carter

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Dec 13, 1998
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I haven't checked eBay yet but I did see it on Barnes and Noble Resellers and Amazon's Marketplace. Both places were rather steep and more than I can afford.
 

Tripp Carter

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eh I'm used to the sticker shock. I think I've been handling it pretty well this evening considering I'm about as clueless as they come at designing
 

Mark Baber

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Just for reference, at the Titanic auction in NYC earlier this month, a hardcover copy of the Olympic/Titanic souvenir issue went for $3,750, and a softcover copy, $1,200.
 
Nov 1, 2005
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Hi,

I am a freelance photographer who grew up in Belfast and have always been fascinated by the shipyard, cranes and Titanic heritage.

A while back, with the news that the area was being cleared and redeveloped I decided to go down, investigate and document the remains of this area for my own interest and as a piece of historical evidence.

http://www.sb-photography.co.uk/H&W/index.htm

You will see the various cranes from modern giants to steam power ones that helped build Titanic, Several of the empty Warehouses, paint and plating rooms, offices, boiler rooms and toilet blocks.

I am exhibiting these photographs in a few weeks and am trying to find out a little more about the objects and buildings in the pictures, and any stories and recollections from people who worked in the yard from Titanic to current days.

I will be projecting the images and want to run a narrative through the images of recollections, stories, to give a feeling of atmosphere, celebration and loss.

If anyone would like to comment on the pictures, offer any information or stories I would love to hear.
 

Aaron Zaffuto

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Oct 7, 2005
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Great pics. Its hard to believe that those are the cranes that once lifted the steel to build the great ship.

[Moderator's note: This post which was in a previous thread discussing the same topic, has been moved to here. JDT]
 

david wilson

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Mar 17, 2003
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Question for all technically minded shipbuilders.
"regarding the shell plating on the olympics"what was a stealer plt & did they have one?
regards.
seven degrees west.
dw.
 

david wilson

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Mar 17, 2003
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How's this for a "riveting yarn".In 1918,a riveter from H&W,one Mr James Moir, whilst working on a war ship for the RN,drove 11,209 rivets in a 9 hr shift.Don't ask me what he drove them with.Does anyone know if the phneumatic hammer or the hydraulic squeeser was around then?
regards.
dw.
seven degrees west.
 
Sep 28, 2002
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David,

Just back from Arazona, he used the phneumatic hammer, a world record still stands today. H&W give him £50 for the feat.

Have you seen the book about the rivets. Just read it. Will write when I adjust to the time.
 
Dec 29, 2006
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I note that the question of "unskilled" ship yard workers has been raised in the context of the latest riveting dispute. Just an observation, but those who built the Olympic and Titanic were skilled men with understandable pride in their work. It is true that Harland & Wolff also employed a large number of unskilled labourers - but these would not have been ship-builders. They were engaged in excavating the massive dry docks that were being built to accommodate the now, super-large ships.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>They were engaged in excavating the massive dry docks that were being built to accommodate the now, super-large ships.<<

The unskilled labour was also used in other capacities. It doesn't take an awful lot of know how to be a catch boy for a riveting team or to be useful as a strongback. They wouldn't have been the craftsmen, but they would have been in the service of those who were.
 
Sep 28, 2002
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The book entitled "What really sunk the Titanic" accuses H&W of installing "sub-standard rivets" and poor skills in the Shipyard.

The authors knowledges of H&W workforce leaves a lot to be desired.

Have a look in the Titanic books threads
 
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