Ships Carpenter


Dec 2, 2000
58,643
471
453
Easley South Carolina
I suspect the overflow pipe for the peak tank was in that very small storeroom on the Orlop deck. I'm sure somebody will correct me if I'm wrong, but the next deck down was the tank itself.

If the carpenter was sounding the ship from E deck, it would seem to me that there would be sounding tubes along it's length that he could drop something (A thin line or metal tape with a weight on the end.) into to measure the depth of water in the tanks below. He could also have been eyeballing the spaces below. When one can see the water rushing into spaces where it doesn't belong, it doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that you're in trouble!

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 

david wilson

Member
Feb 17, 2004
210
0
111
A ship's carpenter is not a joiner.Demarcation rules here.There is only one trade in the british merchant navy that can sign on as ship's carpenter & that's an indentured shipwright!Measuring the amount of liquid in all tanks was only part of his portfolio.
regards.
dw.
 
Feb 21, 2013
161
4
73
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Lloret de Mar, Gerona (Spain)
What were the carpenter and joiner's working hours? Apart for being on call the 24 hours, would they have working hours too during the day? Did they take shifts? Would they always be at the carpenter's shop or would they be required to take tours around the ship?

Also, I found their cabin and lavatories on E deck, but where they were supposed to eat meals?
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
6,045
64
308
UK
They were listed as part of the Deck Department, but I can't see them dining with the seamen. I'd guess that they used the Engineers' Mess.
 

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