Ship's name on the wreck [was: I just noticed this...]

Phenomenon

Phenomenon

Member
I was under the distinct impression that Titanic and Olympic didn't have nameplates. ;)
 
Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
>>I was under the distinct impression that Titanic and Olympic didn't have nameplates.<<

They didn't. The names of the ships were incised on the hull plating itself.
 
Scott Mills

Scott Mills

Member
How could they possibly have been switched? That theory was ridiculous to begin with, and now that Titanic's hull number has been found repeatedly on the wreck, how can anyone seriously defend the switch "theory?"

And yes, I see both the C and the T. Indeed in the original image of the bow nameplate I also see a T.
 
Scott Mills

Scott Mills

Member
Also, in regards to the collision damage, that is very interesting! I have a question tough, seeing how much of the damage is burried in the mud, why hasn't any attempt been made to survey the damage from inside the ship?

They've gone pretty deep in now, and it seems there are plenty of access points for a rov.
 
Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
>>have a question tough, seeing how much of the damage is burried in the mud, why hasn't any attempt been made to survey the damage from inside the ship?<<

An attempt was made during one of James Cameron's expeditions to get down to Boiler Room Six by way of the Fireman's spiral staircase. The problem was that everything there was such a jumbled mess that they had to abort the attempt.
 
J

Jake Peterson

Member
I was going to say that they could try the after part where the ship broke off at, but then I figured the decks would probably be too compressed in a downward manner to really go very far.

Did they access the stairway by way of the open hatch on the forecastle? Other then those two ways, I'm not sure how they'd be able to get into the boiler rooms. Did they access the cargo holds from the grand staircase?
 
Scott Mills

Scott Mills

Member
What about the large hole caused by collision with the bottom? It always seemed that would be perfect for an attempt to get in and survey the damage.

That said, I'm not as familiar with the layout of the ship as I am with the "facts" of the sinking.
 
J

Jake Peterson

Member
Ah, that's right. There are a couple of holes on both sides, where it bends down. Maybe they are the ones that open into the cargo hold...
 
I

Ioannis Georgiou

Member
I was going to say that they could try the after part where the ship broke off at, but then I figured the decks would probably be too compressed in a downward manner to really go very far.

Did they access the stairway by way of the open hatch on the forecastle? Other then those two ways, I'm not sure how they'd be able to get into the boiler rooms. Did they access the cargo holds from the grand staircase?

Cameron tried a few times to go into the boiler rooms. He went to the Scotland Road trying to use the escape latters at BR. 5 but he was unable to go with the ROV that small shaft down. Also the other ways were "dead end roads". He also try to send his ROV sending though the break area (between the boilers of BR. 2) but was unable because of too much debris. Beside the WTD would be closed so he would no have chance to go further forward into BR. 3.
As far as I know the hole on the starboard side of the bow is also not good for getting into the boiler room.
 
Scott Mills

Scott Mills

Member
So, since the water tight doors hinder the ability to access the boiler rooms, is it the case that parts of the ship are completely unaccessible because of sealed bulkheads?

Also, I understand why notions of raising the are fantasy, but I wonder if the mud encasing the bow could be cleared away so we cold examine her damage once and for all. That seems like a project that is at least possible.
 
Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
>>Also, I understand why notions of raising the are fantasy, but I wonder if the mud encasing the bow could be cleared away so we cold examine her damage once and for all. That seems like a project that is at least possible.<<

Technically possible yes, but try to persuade anybody who's holding the purse strings that it's worthwhile!

Realistically, that just ain't gonna happen.
 
M

Michael Cundiff

Member
I recall that George Tulloch had thoughts of excavating the 60 odd feet of mud. There is a device that I feel could be modified to help in the endeavor...Pieer Valldy's (IFREMER engineer)
GRAB which is fitted with cameras and purpolsion methods.

Michael Cundiff
NV, USA
 
M

Michael Cundiff

Member
In his first publishing of "Discovery of the Titanic" Robert Ballard reported, what he thought was the faint outline of a "C" on the starboard bow. However when Charlie Haas was an observer aboard the Nautile in '96 they returned to the portside, where in '87 Nargeolet tediously scraped away the rust to reveal the entire T I T A N I C 18" encised letter remants...the letters were no longer visible. I am sure the acting currents helped in the process of the natural state of rustcicle action. Perhaps the "C" on the starboard side is under a different state of deteroriation?

Michael Cundiff
NV, USA
 
I

Ioannis Georgiou

Member
If I remember right, in 2010 the name on the starboard side was partly hidden again by rusticles, but some of the letters are visible. The name of the port side is visible as the letters at the stern. I think in 2001 James Cameron was able to see some of the letters from the name Liverpool while the ROV show in 2010 all letters.
 
Top