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Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>Did ships such as Titanic have any kind of "speedometer" for an instant and continuous report of speed ?<<

Not that I'm aware of. The technology would have existed to put something together and somebody may well have come up with something but I'm not aware of any such device which was in widespread use. Most ships would have worked it out the old fashioned way; with log lines and navigation fixes.

Captain Currie may have better information on this.
 
May 3, 2005
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Michael, once again my apologies for a dumb question. On second thought, there are so many variables involved - cross currents and fore and aft currents affecting the ship's speed in addition to the effects of winds, also from all directions. The bicycle speedometers depended on a direct drive off one of the wheels and more or less in relation to RPM's, which leads us back to reckoning speed by way of the engine RPM's. (The famous 78 RPM on Titanic, for example.)It would seem that some kind of computer to take all these effects into account and come up with the true speed would be the only solution to the problem of a "ship's speedometer."
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>Michael, once again my apologies for a dumb question. <<

Robert, the only dumb question is the one which needs an answer but which one fails to ask. I know for a fact that such instruments exist today because I've seen them in use on the bridge of the USS Comstock. What I'm not sure of is the source of the data they use but I suspect it may be either GPS or SINS.
 
Feb 11, 2006
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The Dream and then the Nightmare: The Syrians who boarded the Titanic-the Story of the Arabic-speaking Passengers is now available - the book can be ordered from:
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New York, NY 10019,

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Tel.: (212) 265-0600

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Jim Currie

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Apr 16, 2008
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Funchal. Madeira
Hello Robert T. Page!

Sorry about the lateness of this reply.

You were absolutely spot -on with your reasons why a speedometer would not work well on a ship. The same reason apply more or less to using engine revolutions. Michael is correct. There is only one way - even up to the present day using sat. nav. - to determine a ship's average speed and incidentally, the true direction she made good during her travels and that is by establishing two correct, exact positions and measuring or calculating the distance between them then applying lapsed time.

JC
 
May 3, 2005
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Hello Jim and Michael -
This is admittedly a rather old comment on an old thread that I'm refering to :

Michael-
>> know for a fact that such instruments exist today because I've seen them in use on the bridge of the USS Comstock. What I'm not sure of is the source of the data they use but I suspect it may be either GPS or SINS.<<

I'll have to admit my "Bridge Experience" on the USS Kenneth Whiting was solely to check out the radar repeater, so I wasn't aware of any other instruments. But that was way back in the dark ages of the previous century.

Jim-
>>that is by establishing two correct, exact positions and measuring or calculating the distance between them then applying lapsed time.<<

I've checked my car's speedometer by using a stopwatch between mile markers. For example at 60MPH it should take exactly 60 seconds between mile markers. But even my relatively cheap GPS gives me accurate speed readings of the car.
 
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Genevieve Laursey

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Hello, I am trying to contact Senan Molony but his details are no longer on the system. Can anyone please provide an email address?
Thank you
Genevieve x
( g.laursey@gmail.com )
 

DavidJon

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Jun 26, 2013
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Davidjon

To Frank Nesson. With regard to your quest to identify your great-uncle's body, many of those victims who could not be identified were buried at sea and only about half the victims' bodies were found so I fear that you were not successful.

By the way as a fellow-Titanic enthusiast and being Jewish, I've compiled a list of passengers who were probably Jewish and I've included your great-uncle. I assume he was - I think that there were about 60-70 Jewish passengers.
 
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May 17, 2014
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Kenyon's are our family. Marion was my fathers great aunt.

My great grandmother was mrs George P Baldwin. We would like to connect if possible: Kathylangager@aol.com

I am researching my family history and my ancestors Frederick R. Kenyon and Marion (Stauffer) Kenyon were on the