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Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>Did ships such as Titanic have any kind of "speedometer" for an instant and continuous report of speed ?<<

Not that I'm aware of. The technology would have existed to put something together and somebody may well have come up with something but I'm not aware of any such device which was in widespread use. Most ships would have worked it out the old fashioned way; with log lines and navigation fixes.

Captain Currie may have better information on this.
 
May 3, 2005
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Michael, once again my apologies for a dumb question. On second thought, there are so many variables involved - cross currents and fore and aft currents affecting the ship's speed in addition to the effects of winds, also from all directions. The bicycle speedometers depended on a direct drive off one of the wheels and more or less in relation to RPM's, which leads us back to reckoning speed by way of the engine RPM's. (The famous 78 RPM on Titanic, for example.)It would seem that some kind of computer to take all these effects into account and come up with the true speed would be the only solution to the problem of a "ship's speedometer."
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>Michael, once again my apologies for a dumb question. <<

Robert, the only dumb question is the one which needs an answer but which one fails to ask. I know for a fact that such instruments exist today because I've seen them in use on the bridge of the USS Comstock. What I'm not sure of is the source of the data they use but I suspect it may be either GPS or SINS.
 
Feb 11, 2006
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The Dream and then the Nightmare: The Syrians who boarded the Titanic-the Story of the Arabic-speaking Passengers is now available - the book can be ordered from:
Dahesh Heritage, Fine Books

1775 Broadway Suite 533

New York, NY 10019,

USA

Tel.: (212) 265-0600

Fax: (212) 265-0601

E-mail:

daheshbooks@aol.com
 

Jim Currie

Member
Apr 16, 2008
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Funchal. Madeira
Hello Robert T. Page!

Sorry about the lateness of this reply.

You were absolutely spot -on with your reasons why a speedometer would not work well on a ship. The same reason apply more or less to using engine revolutions. Michael is correct. There is only one way - even up to the present day using sat. nav. - to determine a ship's average speed and incidentally, the true direction she made good during her travels and that is by establishing two correct, exact positions and measuring or calculating the distance between them then applying lapsed time.

JC
 
May 3, 2005
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Hello Jim and Michael -
This is admittedly a rather old comment on an old thread that I'm refering to :

Michael-
>> know for a fact that such instruments exist today because I've seen them in use on the bridge of the USS Comstock. What I'm not sure of is the source of the data they use but I suspect it may be either GPS or SINS.<<

I'll have to admit my "Bridge Experience" on the USS Kenneth Whiting was solely to check out the radar repeater, so I wasn't aware of any other instruments. But that was way back in the dark ages of the previous century.

Jim-
>>that is by establishing two correct, exact positions and measuring or calculating the distance between them then applying lapsed time.<<

I've checked my car's speedometer by using a stopwatch between mile markers. For example at 60MPH it should take exactly 60 seconds between mile markers. But even my relatively cheap GPS gives me accurate speed readings of the car.
 
G

Genevieve Laursey

Guest
Hello, I am trying to contact Senan Molony but his details are no longer on the system. Can anyone please provide an email address?
Thank you
Genevieve x
( g.laursey@gmail.com )
 

DavidJon

Member
Jun 26, 2013
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London
Davidjon

To Frank Nesson. With regard to your quest to identify your great-uncle's body, many of those victims who could not be identified were buried at sea and only about half the victims' bodies were found so I fear that you were not successful.

By the way as a fellow-Titanic enthusiast and being Jewish, I've compiled a list of passengers who were probably Jewish and I've included your great-uncle. I assume he was - I think that there were about 60-70 Jewish passengers.
 
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May 17, 2014
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Kenyon's are our family. Marion was my fathers great aunt.

My great grandmother was mrs George P Baldwin. We would like to connect if possible: Kathylangager@aol.com

I am researching my family history and my ancestors Frederick R. Kenyon and Marion (Stauffer) Kenyon were on the Titanic. Frederick went down with the ship and Marion was saved on lifeboat 8. I need more information on Marion. I don't know much about her but she had a sister Mrs. George P. Baldwin of Oak Park, Chicago. After the sinking Marion went to Santa Monica, CA where she died. If there are any relatives of Marion out there I would really like to hear from you!
Deb Silva
CT
 

SueFreitag

Member
Apr 29, 2016
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Reference 2nd class passenger John Denzil Jarvis. I believe that this passenger is my father's uncle. My father, Ernest George Jarvis, has always told me about an uncle who went down on the Titanic. My father, who is still alive at 91 tells me that his father was born in Leicester and his name was Ernest Herbert Jarvis. He died when my father was two months old. Ernest Herbert Jarvis is buried near Bedlinog (Dowlas Top). He married Alice Gertrude Lant (buried at Llandovery). As far as I know Ernest Herbert Jarvis had a sister called Gweneth, who was a teacher in Leicester and another brother who's name I do not know but was an architect and lived on the Leicester to London Road.

Richard Jarvis
Gillingham Dorset UK
Hoping to contact Richard Jarvis, I know it's years since he posted this but we have only just come across this information. We have traced the Jarvis family through Wales and established the connection with the Titanic and how John Denzil Jarvis and Ernest George Jarvis were related, but our main focus is Alice.

Alice Gertrude Lant was my husband's grand aunt. He and his cousin who were both born in Llandovery would like to find out what happened to her. Her son Ernest George Jarvis was Baptised in St Mathias Church Treharris, (which is near Bedlinog) 9 Jan 1910, this was almost two years after the death of his father Ernest Herbert Jarvis registered in Merthyr Tydfil July 1908. The last definite information we have about Alice is 29 June 1917 when she registered the death of her mother. Both were living at 3 Chapel Street, Treorchy at that time.

Alice's niece told us that Alice is buried in Llandovery alongside her father George Lant. We know where his grave is but it's unmarked and to date enquiries with the Vicar have failed to trace Alice's burial there. However, we have no idea when she died or her surname at the time.

Any contact from Richard Jarvis or anyone who knows him or how to contact him would be greatly appreciated.

Sue and Stewart Freitag
Caerphilly, Wales
 

Chris Tingle

Member
Mar 22, 2019
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Re: Henry Tingle Wilde

Hi, im a decendant of H.Wilde and would deeply apriciate it if Brian Ticehurst or any of the other contributers to the web page could kindly e-mail me so that i may speak to them about what they know, or if the writer of the page could e-mail me would also be greatly apriciated at crazycrookes@hotmail.co.uk
Let me know what you found out. Henry Wilde could be my long lost twin. Chris
 

Mark Baber

Moderator
Member
Dec 29, 2000
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Hello, Chris---

Note that the message you're responding to is over twelve years old, and the person who posted it is no longer a member here. You may therefore not get an answer from him.
 

Chris Tingle

Member
Mar 22, 2019
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Hello, Chris---

Note that the message you're responding to is over twelve years old, and the person who posted it is no longer a member here. You may therefore not get an answer from him.
Shot in the dark - but hey, you saw my post and replied within 48 minutes. I assumed others would see my interest and jump in. Mahalo