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Linda Cooper

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Sep 23, 2007
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Although I have to admit that I have not seen the entire "A Night To Remember" (maybe it's just me, but they just don't seem to run very often where I live and haven't gotten the video yet), but what few scenes that I have seen it looks like a lot of the dialogue was used in Cameron's version.
 
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sharon rutman

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Titanic movies can be interchangeable at times-we've all heard lines like "God Himself Could Not Sink This Ship" again and again. Can't be helped I guess. The most shameless ripoff line I know about is when Jack tells a suicidal Rose about the cold water being like "a thousand knives into your body". Ummmmm I wonder what Lightoller would have said about that little bit of some fictional character borrowing his line without permission mind you.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>but what few scenes that I have seen it looks like a lot of the dialogue was used in Cameron's version.<<

That shouldn't be surprising since as much of the Titanic mythos got jump started by ANTR as any serious attempt at history. It would be amazing if everybody else didn't pick up on it to some degree.
 
Feb 24, 2004
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Walter Lord was a memorable writer and, through his many interviews and correspondences with Titanic survivors, managed to fill his books with equally memorable lines. What he wrote became virtually a screenplay for future generations of film makers.

Roy
 
Dec 29, 2006
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As Titanic and a Night to Remember were both based upon the same historic event, there will inevitably be similarities. At the same time, there is a lingering suspicion that certain ideas and scenes from ANTR were copied in the more recent film. However, in many cases, the subtlety of the original is abandoned in its entirety.

Although its executive director was an American, ANTR is an archetypal British film that has many characteristically British quirks. For example, the scene in which a group of Third Class passengers are confronted with a locked grill on their way up to the boat deck and smash it with an axe has a deliberately humorous aspect, insofar as the po-faced steward says something to the effect of ’ere, mate, you can’t do that — its company property! This scene is utterly perverted in Cameron’s version, insofar as was we are supposed to believe that the poor, down-trodden steerage passengers are deliberately locked below decks so that they can die.

In fact, taking the comparison further, it will be noted that in ANTR the same group of Third Class passengers are among the heroes of the film; we follow them on their fateful journey from “Ireland” (which looks suspiciously like somewhere in Buckinghamshire) and are “with them” on their escape to the safety of the boat deck — willing them to live. In Cameron’s version, one of them (risibly) gets shot by one of the ship’s racist, incompetent and mentally unstable officers! It is almost laughable.
 
Dec 29, 2006
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Sorry, a there is a minor error in my last post - Earl St John, the American producer who was in overall charge of Pinewood Studios when A Night to Remember was made, was the "Executive Producer", not the executive director.
 
May 3, 2005
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>>Although I have to admit that I have not seen the entire "A Night To Remember" (maybe it's just me, but they just don't seem to run very often where I live and haven't gotten the video yet), but what few scenes that I have seen it looks like a lot of the dialogue was used in Cameron's version.<<

I have the DVD's for the Titanic movies of 1953, ANTR , 1997 and the TV miniseries with George C. Scott.

There is quite a lot of the dialogue in the Cameron 1997 version from ANTR and the others.

A few examples:

The lines about the number of trunks, etc. in the opening scenes in the Cameron 1997 version is almost identical to that in ANTR...even our good friend Caledon Hockley looks very much like ...and speaks very much like the snob....like the younger gentleman in ANTR .

Molly Brown's speech in the 1997 version is identical to Richard Sturges's speech in the 1953 version : "Why do the British have to sound dinner as if it was a cavalry charge ?"

Jack Dawson's farewell speech to Rose Dewitt-Bukater in the 1997 version is almost identical to Gifford Rogers to Annette Sturges in the 1953 version: "I wouldn't have missed this....."

Possibly there are many others.
 

Will C. White

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Apr 18, 2007
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Mike-It's those damn ancillary markets-they're always looking for a big hit song from a (usually) new artist with 'tween appeal or a hot mega star. Almost never has anything to do with the flick; at least "My Heart" fits. Imagine a "gangsta rap" on 'Titanic' from 50 Cent instead. Enough to make you shudder! WILL
 
Jun 12, 2004
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Imagine 50 Cent portraying LaRoche from 2C performing with the Titanic's band on the aft-boat deck, LOL. That would be . . . pretty awful.
 
May 3, 2005
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>>At least ANTR spared us the almost obligatory song that movie makers like to put at the end of their flicks these days.<<

Michael, don't get me wrong, I'm just as much a devotee of ANTR as any others on this Website, but I wish they had a more complete listing of actors, etc. (I don't see Bernard Fox [Frederic Fleet] listed-is he on there somewhere ?).....at least on JC's you can find out who the "Second to the assistant broom pusher" was...if you can stand the song that long...but then there's that little "mute" button that's always there on your remote control.....
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>but I wish they had a more complete listing of actors, etc.<<

So would I but the conventions of the time didn't require all that much. The credits these days go on forever, but back in the 1950's, it would be the principle actors followed by "The End"

Curt, but it spared us the song at the end of the show!
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Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Cameron should perhaps have taken one more line from ANTR and followed up the rendition of My Heart Will Go On with an Oirish passenger calling out "Ah well now, that's enough of that. Give us something livelier."
 
Feb 24, 2004
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>>The credits these days go on forever, but back in the 1950's, it would be the principle actors followed by "The End"

The worst offenders I've seen are the Lord of the Rings DVD extended versions. Heck, they even list the entire Tolkien Fan Club.

Oh, and BTW Michael, a lot of 50s films listed principal actors only at the beginning - followed by just "The End" (or "The End?") at the end.

One of the more reliable sources I've found for complete cast lists is the Internet Movie Database (Imdb). If you have the correct title, you can Google it as simply as (for instance):

imdb night to remember

That makes it easy even if there's more than one film with the same title.

http://www.imdb.com/
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>Oh, and BTW Michael, a lot of 50s films listed principal actors only at the beginning - followed by just "The End" (or "The End?") at the end.<<

You're right, and if memory serves, that's exactly how ANTR did it.
 
Jun 12, 2004
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Well, didn't ANTR feature the cast at the beginning over the water? Kenneth More's name was sized larger than the rest, and out of the remaining cast, a few prominent names stood out over yet smaller font. With this, why list them again at the end?

Of course, the people and the characters they portrayed weren't distinguished--just a list of names--which I thought somehow detracted from the cast list.

In any case, the cast credits are presented this way in my copy of the movie.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>With this, why list them again at the end?<<

No particular reason unless you're running credits at the end and that wasn't the practice back then. It is now, and on steroids yet. Even notice how the stars get prominant billing at the beginning and at the end is a list of credits so long it's almost a movie in it's own right?

No wonder they run those songs at the end: To drive you out when you might otherwise fall asleep!
 
Dec 29, 2006
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Hardly anybody would have seen the final credits of A Night to Remember when the film was first released in the 1950s because, at that time, British cinemas used to play the National Anthem at the end of every performance. For reasons which were never entirely clear, the British cinema-going public had a particular aversion to the sound of “God Save the Queen”￾, and there used to be a mass stampede for the nearest exit well before the final credits had rolled. This was generally known as “Getting out before the Queen comes on”￾. Oddly, if the dreaded dirge started up before the cinema had been totally vacated, those who had not escaped in time would turn towards the screen and stand to attention in embarrassed silence until the Anthem had ceased.
 

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