Sinage in the Reception Room


Nigel Bryant

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Aug 1, 2010
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Hello everyone,

Has anyone noticed under the Brass letters that read D-Deck on the wall opposite the Grand Stairway of the Reception Room, there is some smaller writing also inscribed in brass. If nobody knows what I mean look in "Illustrated History" on pg 55. There is a photo of the Reception Room looking aft. You can clearly see the Brass letters that say "D-DECK" Under that you can just make out some very small writing. Cameron also had this detail in his Reception room set. You can see it on the tour option in "Titanic Explorer" CD-ROM. Does anyone know what this writing says. Is it directions to certain rooms onboard the ship?

Regards,

Nigel
 
Apr 22, 2012
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Hello Nigel,

I'm not an expert on the subject of first class interiors (not the reception room at least), but perhaps it could be indicating where the first class lifts were located. I think in other photos I've saw similar signs, and they mention something about the lifts beneath them. I don't know, maybe I'm mistaking.

P.S.: How's that "Summary of the First Class Rooms on the Titanic" coming?


Cheers,
happy.gif


-B.W.
 
C

chris mcqueeny

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I think that the text may have said "saloon deck". I know that most ships have another name besides the letter for the decks, and on most Titanic floorplans, D is Saloon Deck. How much text is there?
 

Nigel Bryant

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Aug 1, 2010
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To Brandon,

My article is published on the net. It is at www.titanic-model.com.

It is on the main page and it is called " Nooks and Crannies of first-class onboard the R.M.S Titanic"

Phil will hopefully be publishing it here with conjunction with the deck plans on this site as well.

To Chris,

I have to look at my Titanic Explorer again. I think it was at least 9 lines or something. I will post both of you an image so you know what I am talking about. It's quite unnoticeable.

Regards,

Nigel
 
C

chris mcqueeny

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Oh. Perhaps it was a list of the main rooms on D deck...
 

Nigel Bryant

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Aug 1, 2010
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To Brandon and Chris,

This is just a guess but since D-Deck was the main boarding deck for first-class passengers, one of the passenger's first public rooms they would enter would be the Reception Room. The sign was probably a list of all the rooms on the whole ship ( For example: Lounge A-deck) They would either take the lifts or the staircase. Maybe there was this same type of sign behind the elevators as well. It would give directions for passengers which deck each room would be.

Regards,

Nigel
 

Dave Hudson

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Apr 15, 2011
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I doubt that the sign was a guide to D Deck, since there were only two public rooms there and no other deck seems to have had a similar list. I also doubt that it was a guide to the ship because it is only three lines long with appearently no one letter words. I should say, however, that there is what looks like a frame or border, but it may be more text, making it five lines.
My guess is that it's in reference to the Dining Saloon, possibly meal times, although these times were posted in the passenger list and the bugler would warn the passengers well ahead of time. Maybe it's a notice regarding religious services.
The first word appears to be short and somewhat resembles 'ALL'. The second word seems to be longer and is possibly 'PASSENGERS'. This is all a guess, of course. Could anyone else shed some light on this?

David
 
Dec 7, 2000
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The picture of the reception room on Olympic on p. 55 is in Olympic's later life. I'm quite confused though. According to Bruce Beveridge, Olympic's deck allocations changed in later 1914 (B deck became A deck, C deck became B and D deck became C - and so on). If this is true: that the deck arrangements did occur in late 1914 then this picture must be pre-late-1914.

If you look at the picture of Olympic's reception room on p. 53 you'll see that the brass signs are not there. The picture on p. 53 was before Olympic's 1912 - 1913 refit. Therefore I'm assuming that the Titanic's would have looked very similar - which means without the brass signs.

If the picture on p. 55 is after 1912 - 1913 (which it must be) then it has to be before late 1914. This is where the situation becomes difficult. I have Olympic first class accommodation plans for May 1913 and for June 1914. The furniture arrangement in the reception room is exactly the same as on Titanic, and there is no extra chairs and tables in front of the main couch which is situated just under the large painting.

I also have a simple Olympic plan for 1921 which does have the new deck arrangement (where B is A deck and so on).

Maybe the deck arrangement change did take place around the time of the break out of WWI, and if not would have certainly been implemented after Olympic was once again fitted out as a passenger liner in 1918 (or 1919).

Either way this picture - which is a postcard by the way - must have been taken before the end of 1914. However deck plans do not agree with the furniture arrangement.

I realise I'm not solving anything here, but maybe all this gibberish might be able to help.

One thing that I am trying to say is that I doubt the brass signs were on Titanic - so Cameron *might* have had it wrong.

If you look in the picture credits, this postcard belongs to George Behe, perhaps he might be able to help as to the date of this postcard - or whether the small words are readable.

Daniel.
 
Jul 22, 2001
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I think that the last two words read "Dining saloon" perhaps it says something like all passengers refrain from smoking in the dining saloon? I don't know. Emma
 

George Behe

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Dec 11, 1999
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Hi, Nigel!

I haven't been following this thread, so I didn't know that your private email to me referred to my Olympic postcard that was reproduced in "T:AIH." Sorry about the misunderstanding.

When I get home from work I'll haul out my old microscope and take a look at the postcard. (The fact that the card is a real photo instead of a printed photo means it's just barely possible that the tiny sign might be legible under extreme magnification.)

All my best,

George
 

George Behe

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Dec 11, 1999
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Hi, Nigel!

I'm afraid there's no joy in Mudville tonight. The text of the sign appears to be slightly below the threshold of legibility.

One of these days I'll buy a scanner; maybe that'll enable me to electronically enhance the photo's details to the point where I can make out a word or two.

Sorry I couldn't be more helpful to you at the moment, though.

All my best,

George
 

Eric Sauder

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Nov 12, 2000
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Nigel had sent me a private e-mail some time ago regarding the sign under the words "D Deck" in the Reception Room, asking if knew what it said.

I spoke to Ken Marschall yesterday and asked him if he knew. He said that during the production of the Cameron movie, he spent a bit of time trying to figure it out. Unfortunately, no photo he has seen shows the sign clearly enough to make it out. He said he could figure out a few words, but that was all. He didn't remember off the top of his head what he could read, but he does have it in his notes from the Cameron production, and when he comes across it, he'll let me know, and I'll pass it along.

Eric Sauder
 
Sep 20, 2000
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Hi, Nigel:

For what it's worth, on that particular graphic (the link photo) these somewhat bleery eyes perceive three lines with times listed adjacent, followed possibly by a separator line, followed by a text message. I could imagine -- though I can't make out most of it -- that the first part indicates breakfast, lunch, and dinner hours. ("8...0 a.m." seems reasonably clear in the top line.)

It could indeed be that, except that the relative length of the second line precludes it's being "Lunch" per se. But:

Breakfast ... 8... a.m.
Luncheon ...
Dinner...
---------------------

seems possible. (The fit of the relative word length is more obvious modeled with a fixed-pitch font.) The script beneath, which also appears to be smaller print than the top lines, is a lost cause, for me at least.

I'll certainly take a gander at "Titanic: IH". But of course if George can't make it out on the postcard ...

Cheers,
John Feeney
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Nigel,

That photo that shows the words on the paneling that we were all talking about was taken in 1920 (I think in Southampton).

Daniel.
 

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