Smoking Room paneling from OIympic where is it


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I'm sure I read that "Approach To The New World" was a painting on the Titanic. Whether it was hung in the Smoking Room or not, I don't know. I'll have a look when I get home tonight to see which author got it wrong and post my findings accordingly.

In any case, are there copies of these paintings in existence anywhere? It would be nice to know as I have 3 empty spaces on my wall and I would like something special there.

Cheers,

Boz
 
Tarn, the one you're talking about is Titanic & Her Sisters, Olympic and Britannic for the misidentification of the Aquatania. Rather an amazing mistake IMO.

In Anatomy, I noticed quite a few, like the 15.5 ton centre anchor being said to weigh 55 tons, and that identification of the Britannic at launch as the Titanic based on the presence of the so-called Ismay Screen. (The Ismay Screen apparently wasn't installed on the Titanic until around March 1912.) Then there is the infamous steam sluce valve which is identified as a watetight door, the stern frame assembly identified as the boss arm....

I'll take the photos any day. Their priceless IMO. Everything else, I second source!

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
If anyone has seen the ''Making Of A Night To Remember'' Walter Lord states that his research was wrong when he had said the Painting of NY harbour (Norman Wilkinson's ''Approach To The New World) and that the true painting was indeed a painting of Plymouth Harbour.
It seems that because ''A Night to Remember'' stated NY was the painting, many other authors seem to have followed, thinking ANTR can in no way be wrong.
Everyone makes mistakes tho dont they?
happy.gif
 
They don't half!!!

So it is established then that "Plymouth Harbour" is the Titanic and "Approach To The New World" is Olympic?

And any idea where I could obtain prints of said paintings?

Cheers,

Boz
 
N

Nathan Good

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Hi again,

I seem remember hearing somewhere that it is virtually impossible to find a copy of "Plymouth Harbor" anywhere. I think very little is actually known about that print, but in terms of "Approach to the New World, sorry, I can't help you.

All the best,

Nathan
 
Nathan,
I was actually surprised to see a photo of the original "Plymouth Harbor" painting at all. When I had purchased Titanic Voices back in '98, I saw the painting photo for the first time. Wilkinson's son, as the caption goes, researched his father's estate and photos to come up with the "Plymouth Harbor" recreation for the 1997 movie "Titanic"...
 
I hunted around on the 'net trying to find out more about Wilkinson's paintings and found this on www.art-gallery.co.u k:

Titanic Book (Title Not Known) by Norman Wilkinson / Grant Richards, dated 1910.

Does this mean there were paintings in existence of the Titanic before she was even launched or have I got it completely wrong per usual?

Cheers,

Boz
 
A

Atle Ellefsen

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A part of the í  la carte restaurant on the Celebrity Cruises' 90,000 GRT "Millenium" (delivered summer 2000 from Chantiers De L'Atlantique, St. Nazaire) is panelled with original Olympic interior. I can not say if it is from the smoking room, but it has been authenticated. The name of the restaurant is the "Olympic Restaurant" and there is a small museum type display at the entrance with photos and history of the ship. To my recollection, the panels were purchased from a pub or restaurant in England. For more info those interested could contact Celebrity Cruises.

Cheers,
Atle.
 
As I said before, I don't know how the name "Approach to the New World" came about, but Olympic's painting was called simply "New York Harbour". Titanic Voices have both the Titanic and Olympic paintings in colour!

Daniel.
 
Hello Alte:

None of the Smoking Room paneling from Olympic is on board the "Millenium," only a portion of the a la carte Restaurant.

"To my recollection, the panels were purchased from a pub or restaurant in England."

It actually was purchased from the Nortons, a very nice older couple who lived in Southport, England. It was originally installed in their flat back in the mid-1930s by the previous owner, the Mayoress of Southport, who bought the paneling at the dispersal sale of the ship's fittings. When the Nortons purchased the flat, the provenance had changed slightly, and they were told that the woodwork was from a German battleship! Hmmm....

Wherever it was from, the Nortons knew it was exactly what they were looking for. Only later did one of their sons find out the paneling was actually from Olympic.

"...but it has been authenticated."

Indeed it has. Ken Marschall and I first found the paneling back in the late 1980s while on a research trip to England.

I had a look at the site Alte suggested. I couldn't stop laughing when I read it loudly proclaiming that "the 1940s-style RMS Olympic Restaurant is the picture of grandeur and elegance." 1940s, huh?

Eric Sauder
 
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Atle Ellefsen

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Eric, David

Thanks for filling me in with this interesting info. Quite a story, this panelling. I visited the Millennium when she was new, I felt a strange awe just being there, knowing that this was a piece of the real thing.

Best regards

Atle.
 
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