Smoking room tile colours

Nigel Bryant

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Aug 1, 2010
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Wellington, New Zealand
Hi,
I was wondering what colors were the 1st-class smoking room tiles in the Titanic. In Parks's site they are red and blue, in "Anatomy of Titanic", they are portrayed as brown and white with a tint of brown.Finally on the Harland and Wolff's website they portray them as a dark green. What color were these tiles?

Regards Nigel
 
Mar 3, 1998
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They are red and blue. My source is Ken Marschall, who saw them during his tour of the wreck site. The colours of both the Titanic and Olympic tiles on my website were scanned directly from colour swatches which Ken sent me (of course, you're looking at a reduced version of the tile, which might alter the appearance somewhat). The colours you see in the tile in 'Anatomy of Titanic' are faded, but they originally matched those found in Olympic. Any colour postcard you might run across portrays Olympic, not Titanic. Evidence from the wreck site proves that Titanic shared tile patterns with, but used entirely different colour combinations than, Olympic.

Anyway, that's how I would answer your question.

Parks
 

Nigel Bryant

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Aug 1, 2010
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Wellington, New Zealand
To Parks,
So the tiles were red and blue, interesting combination. So what would be the colour of the leather chairs and couches? My first obersavation would have been a dark green, but now I dont know. Would they be green or a different colour now to suit the tiles?

Regards Nigel
 
Mar 3, 1998
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That's the kind of question that keeps one up at night. After we started talking about the tiling of the Smoking Room being blue-and-red, the green upholstery on the chairs no longer seemed to fit. Same with the Dining Saloon. Maybe Titanic had a burgandy upholstery on these chairs? Unfortunately, we'll probably never know, as there appears to be no evidence to indicate what the furniture looked like, colour-wise.

This points out one important lesson...what we conceive of as Titanic is really an amalgam of Olympic and Titanic.

Parks
 

Dan Cherry

Active Member
Mar 3, 2000
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For some strange reason, when all the hubaloo about Titanic came to the limelight, my 1985-6 photocopies of pictures have the smoking room chairs and couches rendered in dark red/maroon/burgundy (whatever you wish to call it) as reference. I have no basis for that, except I must have heard something back then that caused me to do that; otherwise, the picture would have been left in B&W.
Parks, I agree with what you say.
 
Mar 3, 1998
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Everytime I see one, I forget to take a measurement. But as I think about the relative size of the Olympic tiles that H&W were selling a while back, I seem to remember that each was about a square foot, or maybe just a tad less.

Parks
 
J

Jim Trebowski

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hi all..yes..thats just about it...there is a tile in the Orlando exhibit....surplus to requirements so it was placed in Thomas Andrews offfice instead.
 

Thomas Ford

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Jun 22, 2010
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hi does anyone have any coloured pics of what the smoking room would look like? It would be greatly appreciated.
 

JJAstorII

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Mar 14, 2017
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Los Angeles, CA

JJAstorII

Member
Mar 14, 2017
124
39
38
Los Angeles, CA
That's the kind of question that keeps one up at night. After we started talking about the tiling of the Smoking Room being blue-and-red, the green upholstery on the chairs no longer seemed to fit. Same with the Dining Saloon. Maybe Titanic had a burgandy upholstery on these chairs? Unfortunately, we'll probably never know, as there appears to be no evidence to indicate what the furniture looked like, colour-wise.

This points out one important lesson...what we conceive of as Titanic is really an amalgam of Olympic and Titanic.

Parks
I feel like I can almost guarantee the smoking room furniture was not green. Any interior designer etc would never ever mix red and green together. It's interesting we don't know the dining room for sure cause you see those old pics of the Mackay-Bennett that show they picked up a dining room chair from the wreck and put it on the boat. But where is it? I'm honestly always baffled that these interiors are still a mystery to us all when thousands of people were on that ship whether from her fitting installation to her sea trials to her actual sailing. Edwardians must've had terrible memories...I remember reading one survivors account who couldn't remember if her Steward was a man or woman.