So what do we think will happen to her really


Allen R. Hall

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Jan 22, 2011
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I'm no expert. I know the economy in the US is bad, but I don't know how it works, and I don't know if it's even relevant. But I do think this: regardless of what happens to her, scrap or refurbishing, something needs to be done now. Just think of the jobs that could be created.

Does anybody know if Obama's bill provides money for such a project?
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>Does anybody know if Obama's bill provides money for such a project?<<

Don't know but unlikely. If it did, I would think that the group trying to save her would be crowing about it and the silence out there is a loud one. The sad reality is that when the times get tough, historical preservation tends to take it in the shorts.
 

James Carey

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Sep 14, 2004
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What I would like to see happen?

Have her as a static display somewhere. Repainted on the outside and businesses on the inside.


What I think will happen?

At a sale price of $20 million, for a empty shell of a former Ocean Liner, she is overpriced for anyone to buy her. If she still had her interiors, maybe she would have a chance, but not now. The global economy is horrible, and I see no one fronting the money to sink into her.

I would rather see her end up a a reef off the coast, where sport divers and fish could still enjoy her. Maybe even use her in a Hollywood movie about a disaster at sea, and have her sinking be part of the footage in the film.

I would think the US govt would want to avoid her going to the scrap yards to avoid the embarassing headlines about scrapping the United States, especially with the new administration spending money like it was going out of style.


But then, I am talking about the US Govt.

but I digress!
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>But then, I am talking about the US Govt.<<

The U.S. government very publicly canceled and scrapped an aircraft carrier by the name just a few days after construction began. This would turn out to be a blessing in disguise for naval aviation at a later time but that's a different bit of history. The fact is that the name itself has never been a barrier to casual disposal.
 
Apr 27, 2005
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As I've pointed out in the past, using her as a permanently moored convention center in New York Harbor might be the only salvation for her. Yes, refurbishing her as a public works project might create some jobs, but to what end? Keeping up a static ship is a hole in the water into which one throws money. I think her aluminum is too valuable an asset to allow unclaimed. In the end, she'll be broken up, but hopefully in this country, not India or China.
One last point: Before anyone points a finger at the new administration for spending money, remember please, the last administration put us into debt way over our heads, especially as we came off a balanced budget. Obama has the model of the FDR "New Deal" which could be seen as a blessing or a curse. World War II did as much for ending the depression as did Roosevelt. Jack Kennedy also plopped a great deal of public money into the space program, and that yielded huge payoffs in terms of technology. There is a precedent to heavy public spending. I'm not sure there is an alternative to bailing out the country at this point, much as I hate the idea.

And now back to our originally schedule topic.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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The placing us into debt way over our heads has been going on for a very long time now. One could point to any president or administration as being culpable over the past 60 years and they wouldn't be entirely wrong. It's easy to be irresponsible when you have access to a credit card with no limits and the legal means to compel revenue, and government has that sort of thing down to an art form.

In this context however, it makes very little real difference since any money to restore the SSUS would have to come from the private sector. Even if they were flush with cash, the government seldom ever lifts a finger to help out with preservation.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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From The S.S. United States Conservancy Blog:

SS United States: Breaking News
quote:

March 16, 2009 - The Conservancy has learned that while the ship has officially been listed with a broker, her current owners say she’s not to be sold to non-U.S. entities or scrappers. Read on…

The current owner of the SS UNITED STATES has informed the SS United States Conservancy that important conditions have been imposed on the terms of the ship’s sale.
Full blog entry at http://ssunitedstatesconservancy.org/SSUS/blog/ss-united-states-breaking-news/
 
Jul 11, 2001
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OK here's the plan. We "borrow" some tug boats and tow the SS.US to New York and tie it up next to the Intrepid in the middle of the night. Then we sneak away under the cover of darkness. When the sun rises and the public sees her there it will create a media frenzy.
 
Jan 29, 2001
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Mr. Walter Cronkite is going to purchase her, Cronkite the *newly* elected chairman of "Save our ship" will be able to relive is sailing aboard her in 1953. With hope, due to our Ocean Liner interest and feelings for the "Big U", Cronkite will invite as many of us here that her capacity will allow. En-rout to the UK, we will be sure to stop at the Lat. & Long. of TITANIC and pay our respects...;-)

Michael Cundiff
NV, USA
 
Jan 29, 2001
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Nice response David, good thing about our current President Obama...in regards to a question into his reaction of the AIG undoings, something to the effect..."I look before I leap".

Michael Cundiff
NV, USA
 
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Really? I don't care, shes been disrespected so much by just being left to rust, that I think it would be best to scrap her, not many people will have use for an ocean liner over fifty years old. It would be nice to see her be made in to a hotel, though.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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James Doyle

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Jul 30, 2002
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So after hearing the latest bit of good news, IF (and I do understand this is a BIG IF) enough funds are allocated for her to be preserved, what do you all think would be the most viable option? Floating hotel? Retail center? A return to service? Take your pick and discuss why!

I for one would love to see her as a permanent attraction tied up along the Hudson in New York, where she belongs, freshly painted, looking just as she did on her maiden voyage. One can dream, right?
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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A lot will depend on if the mixed-use Rotterdam succeeds. So far, things seem to be going well with that venture and, long term, it might serve to negate the 35-year-long bad impression the Queen Mary has made: virtually every time you mention adaptive reuse for a liner, opponents rightfully point at the fiasco out in Long Beach and say IT WILL NEVER WORK. Maybe it can work.

Since nothing remains of the United States' interiors, the best bet for long term success would probably be as a ship-themed hotel and conference center, a la Rotterdam. One large bedroom, with portholes, occupying the site of three original cabins would be suitably shiplike for tourists. Not satisfying for history buffs, of course, but far more likely to generate money.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Realistically, a return to service isn't going to happen. Not that it couldn't as a purely technical matter, but the devil is always in the details. For starters, the main propulsion plant would have to be completely replaced and that would only serve to destroy a vital part of what makes the ship important from a historical perspective.

Once the uneconomical steam plant had been replaced...very likely with diesels...then every single part of the ship would have to be refitted with passenger accomadations, all the required support facilities, and then she would have to be brought up to current SOLAS standards.

I don't see this group being able to lay their hands on the kind of money that's going to be needed to make it happen. What I do see is an ongoing restoration effort that's going to have to be done piecemeal. It'll be a long time coming and an ongoing work in progress but for a preservationist group, far more practical.

The trick is going to be to avoid the comedy of errors which has bedeviled the Queen Mary for the past 42 years. The Rotterdam could very well serve as a model of how to do it right.
 

James Doyle

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Did they retain the original public rooms and decor on the Rotterdam? I'd be curious to see if they would re-build some of United States' original public rooms with updated decor or recreate 1950's chique. What's old is always new again...sometimes!
 

Jim Kalafus

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Rotterdam. Original public rooms retained. The cabins were mostly torn out, and rebuilt as much larger rooms, in atyle sympathetic to the original.
 

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