Solomon Sasson


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Apr 20, 2007
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Hi, my name is Solomon. I'm 32 years old. I've been fascinated and intrigued by the Titanic, since I was 9 years of age--- when I first learned of her stunning legacy and story in better detail. Even though, from the very beginning, my interest and fascination with Titanic and all things related to her, was deep indeed--- I did not follow my interest in her legacy and story regularly initially.
But, when I was 21 Years of age, I finally started getting more and more into her story, and understanding and learning it so much better. Needless to say, I was hooked.
A year later, I bought a put-together model. I built it for 3 years... Yeah, I know: I am not that skilled a (model)builder, I guess. It actually took me more time to build the model ship, than it probably took (time) to build the REAL Titanic... Anyway, at last I finished building the model and put in on the shelf inside a glass casing.

I also have collected some books (also put on the shelf near the model) of Titanic, from Authors Walter Lord, Pellegrino, Dr. Bob Ballard, Cameron, Wyn Craig Wane and some National Geographic issues from the 1985 discovery of the wreck... I don't know if that gets me the "certificate" Titanic buff name--- but I sure like to consider myself as one.

Ok, friends. I'm new here. Just wanted to say "Hi" to everyone. I think I'm going to enjoy being with people who share my fascination, interest and Love with all things Titanic related.

With regards and Blessings, Solomon (James99)
 

Jason D. Tiller

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Aug 20, 2000
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Hello Solomon,

Welcome aboard! You've joined the best site to discuss all things Titanic.

Actually, it took three years to build the great ship, so don't feel too bad about taking that length of time to complete your model. I'd say that you have enough books in your collection to be called a Titanic buff; although as long as you have an interest and a passion for her which you do, that's all you need.

Enjoy and see you around the board.
 
Apr 20, 2007
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Thanks a lot, Jason. It really feels here among friends who share the same passion.

I can't pinpoint it exactly, but there was something this year--- in this April 2007--- 95'th Anniversary of the Titanic-- that got me all re-kindled up and back again on the topic of the RMS Titanic.
I mean, I was always (and will always be, somehow I know this) passionate towards this specific incredible ocean-liner and especially the human stories on-board her--- but I think the fact that 5 more years will mark 100 years of that world-alternating night in April 1912... has got me enthused all over again--- in the same (strong) manner I was a couple of years ago (when I started building my model and collecting the books).

Thanks, Jason, for welcoming me here. It feels very good. I do have many questions and discussions to share with friends here. I'll soon ask them in the boards (especially about the American and British inquiries after the accident, but not only).
Thanks again.
 

Jason D. Tiller

Moderator
Member
Aug 20, 2000
8,239
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Niagara Falls, Ontario
You're very welcome, Solomon. Anniversaries such as the 95th one, do tend to have a habit of reigniting interest in the great ship.

You'll find that there is a lot of good information here, plus some top notch researchers who are very friendly and helpful with any questions that one may have. Watch out though, this site can be very addictive!
happy.gif
 
Apr 20, 2007
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A healthy addiction only proves that you're human (it's the people who don't have any interests or imagination in anything that actually frighten me, you know?), right? Besides, Bill Paxton says at the ending notes of the "Ghosts of the Abyss" DVD, and I agree completely, that:
---"I think you leave Titanic, but it (or rather She) never leaves you. It (She) is always there..."
 
Apr 20, 2007
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Yeah, that' so true. You know, every single person who's visited the wreck has said something to this effect. The Titanic and (now) it's wreck have some other-worldly characters about them. They all feel it (some more than others).

You know, Jason, I wanted to share with you, that no matter how many books and magazines and documentaries I watch--- in ALL of them, it is the Character of 2'nd officer Charles Lightoller that kind of 'gets on my nerves'.
I mean, I'm sorry, but here's the man who WOULD NOT allow a young bridegroom (John Jacob Astor) to accompany his pregnant wife!! So, OK: I get that the rule is "women and children first"--- but then this guy (Lightoller) doesn't even do that!! He doesn't even fill that boat (Madleine Astor's) to full capacity, and just sends it down with many places yet empty!! Is empty air better suited to fill a space in a lifeboat than a human male?

This Lightoller has always come across to me, everytime I read or saw something of Titanic, as a very strict and not too-logical or understanding or considerate a man... and he was an officer on the Titanic.
His harsh strictness and utter lack of compassion, seems anything but officer-like to me.
 
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