Some of your favourite sinking scenes?


LukeW17

Member
Some love it, some hate it but you’ve got to admit James Cameron’s 1997 Titanic affected a lot of people and was a major success and still is.

It is certainly what got me interested in the subject around 10 years ago and again last year when I re-watched the movie - it was then that I actually became interested in the real Titanic and the forensics of the sinking/break up and the real people on board.

Even though we’ve learnt a lot about the sinking and found out that certain parts of the 97 portrayal are wrong or dramatised, I want to know what your favourite scenes are in relation to the sinking - from the iceberg impact to the final moments. Mine would be the moment where we see the stern start to come up after Captain Smith’s death with the forward funnel collapsing and the Grand Staircase imploding and the propellers rising from the sea.

It’s just the music and how dramatic and tense it all is that makes it stand out for me. It is the same with the iceberg impact and the break up, even though we know it wasn’t much like that.

So let me know what you guys liked.

Luke
 
“I'm lonely. And I'm lonely in some horribly deep way and for a flash of an instant, I can see just how lonely, and how deep this feeling runs. And it scares the shit out of me to be this lonely because it seems catastrophic.”

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Aaron_2016

Former Member
Is it just me or is this in poor taste?

We are talking about the deaths of over 1500 people here.

Scenes that touch the viewer's heart. Perhaps the word 'favourite' scene is a little unspecific, but in the general sense I think that many historical movies have moments that tweak the emotions of the viewer. e.g. Schindler's List, Saving Private Ryan, etc.

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Kyle Naber

Member
I love to see (maybe I’m just weird) the sheer destruction of everything in the ship as the stern rises up. Seeing the plates slide out of the shelves, the furniture clashing into each other, hearing the rumbling roar of the machinery was a really impressive sequence for me.

(Beginning to 1:52)
 
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I love the forward half of the Boat deck going under. The fact that JC took a full size section of the ship and sank just as it did (with out the port list) is just amazing as we can see exactly how the water reacted. Not to mention being able to see the Gran-staircase Lift up
 
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Always has and will always will be. This is one reason why regardless on how people feel about the film it will be the crown of Titanic films as no Director before and most like ever will care about the details or go to such great lengths to recreate physical sets. This is why i think the film from a technical standpoint has aged flawlessly as its mostly done in real life. Now it all be CGI and look "Modern" ish if that makes any sense
 
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Kyle Naber

Member
Now it all be CGI and look "Modern" ish if that makes any sense

Let’s not go into the 2012 mini-series horror story...

But that is true about it being the best visually speaking Titanic film. I don’t think any other movie about it could top it. Which is unfortunate because we’ve made so much more progress in 20 years, and the movie still prolongs some myths and misconceptions.
 
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Let’s not go into the 2012 mini-series horror story...

But that is true about it being the best visually speaking Titanic film. I don’t think any other movie about it could top it. Which is unfortunate because we’ve made so much more progress in 20 years, and the movie still prolongs some myths and misconceptions.

Dont get me started on that series (Or blood and steel :eek:)

It would be amazing if with the money that goes into films now could make a updated sinking sequence with all the new data. And while it did not make it into the film, the deleted scene of Lovejoy in the sinking dinning room is great (not for the action) but to see a real time sinking sequence of a full size set of the room

Sadly though if the history of post 97 shows that any director that makes something on the Titanic cares zipo on facts
 
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LukeW17

Member
Scenes that touch the viewer's heart. Perhaps the word 'favourite' scene is a little unspecific, but in the general sense I think that many historical movies have moments that tweak the emotions of the viewer. e.g. Schindler's List, Saving Private Ryan, etc.

.
This post was not meant to be written in poor taste. I should have been more specific about what I meant by ‘favourite’ scene but I meant as in emotionally for the viewer and through a cinematographer point of view i.e. what was done well with special effects.

Luke
 

LukeW17

Member
Dont get me started on that series (Or blood and steel :eek:)

It would be amazing if with the money that goes into films now could make a updated sinking sequence with all the new data. And while it did not make it into the film, the deleted scene of Lovejoy in the sinking dinning room is great (not for the action) but to see a real time sinking sequence of a full size set of the room

Sadly though if the history of post 97 shows that any director that makes something on the Titanic cares zipo on facts
I would love to see an updated version of the movie with all of the information we have today.
As much as I didn’t mind the Jack and Rose story (I can see why Cameron made these people the leading characters) I would love to see an almost ANTR ‘remake’ if you like with the same kind of budget and special effects but focusing on the real characters only and including everything we know for sure to have happened (no Murdoch suicide etc) but also with all of the forensic details such as the lower angle break, the second and third funnel break and port list etc.

But the 1997 film probably stands as one of my favourite films ever despite the many flaws that it has

Luke
 
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A bit late to the topic, but, for me, it the large panning shots (like the one below) as they help give you a general scale of the ship (which is often difficult to imagine or misinterpreted by many ), the tilt showing the progression of the sinking and you get a overall view of events and the mini stories taking place on the boat deck, like the couple standing together on A-deck (Bottom Left), the passengers running atop the officer's quarters (Below the Second Funnel) and how most people are now gathering to the forward lifeboats since the aft one have been launched.
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I admit, I've also got to agree with Georges G. answer showing the Titanic firing rockets in pitch darkness, That image of her alone and helpless (despite being slightly inaccurate) is what partially inspired me to write my book.
 
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