Somebody to blame


liam forber

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Mar 8, 2006
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in the 1997 film when the ship slows down and looks like its about to stop before it hits the ice berg that man pushes the lad out of the way and makes titanic going forward could this be sneaky way of blaming some one

[Moderator's note: This thread was in another topic, but has been moved here. JDT]
 
Feb 24, 2004
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I'm not sure I understand it either, Liam. I don't recall either the ship slowing down, or anyone being pushed out of someone's way in such a manner as to make it go forward (??). Are you thinking of the crewman stationed in the bow who called out, "She going to hit!"? There wasn't any such crewman on the real Titanic. Or maybe someone in the engine room? Most of that's fiction as well. What really frosted me was seeing Fleet being blamed for not spotting the iceberg in time because he and Lee were watching those two brats making out on the well deck.
 
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Donna Grizzle

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yeah, I have to agree Roy. I dind't know anything about Titanic before seeing the movie so needless to say, you tend to believe everything you've seen until you do your own research. I still love the movie, it is in fact my favorite movie period, but I've learned to distinguish the fact from fiction. The same cannot be said for the casual viewer, and therefore I think Cameron took a little too much liberty in the portrayals of some of the historical figures, Murdoch and Smith in particular.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
If anything rendered Fleet and Lee in the least bit inatentive, it would have been being exposed in the crow's nest on a freezing night with a ship's motion induced wind of around 22 knots. This would have put the wind chill factor in the region of 15°.

Anyone think that wouldn't have a debilitating effect after two hours?

I've been there, and done that! Trust me...it would!
 

Inger Sheil

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Dec 3, 2000
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I believe Liam is referring to Murdoch shoving past Moody in order to implement the orders himself - he's throwing the telemotors full astern, Liam, not pushing them to full ahead.

While I'm not particularly pleased with that scene (and particularly in the interaction depicted between Moody and Murdoch), I don't think there's any suggestion Murdoch is trying to subvert his own orders by getting the Sixth Officer out of the way.
 

Matthew Smith

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Mar 12, 2006
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jim put the scene of where rose and jack distract fleet and lee because he beleived (im not saying he's right im just explaining) something distracted them
QUOTE:
If anything rendered Fleet and Lee in the least bit inatentive, it would have been being exposed in the crow's nest on a freezing night with a ship's motion induced wind of around 22 knots. This would have put the wind chill factor in the region of 15°.

Anyone think that wouldn't have a debilitating effect after two hours?

I've been there, and done that! Trust me...it would!


Michael i pretty much agree with you that would have probably helped make them less aware what with trying to keep warm etc

Edited to remove image, due to copyright issues - JDT
 
Feb 24, 2004
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Why are we saying that Fleet and Lee were *distracted*? - by icy cold weather, oversexed kids, or anything, for that matter? Sounds like a scriptwriter's ploy to me.

BTW, I checked the scene where Murdoch bulldozes past Moody. The only damage done was to the tea in Moody's teacup. Ever notice all the teacups on the bridge in this movie? Another bit of screenwriter symbolism, IMHO.
 
May 3, 2005
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There is also a nitpick on this subject that the teacups appear to be glued to the saucers.

There are also teacups in the engine room in ANTR.

Matthew:

Here's the caption to your picture of Jack and Rose:
Rose
sad.gif
aside to Jack): "Look, Jack, those lookouts in the crow's nest are watching us !"
Jack
sad.gif
aside to Rose): "Those lousy limey ******'s !They've got a lot of nerve. Why don't they mind their own business and look out for icebergs !"
 
Feb 24, 2004
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Hi, Robert!

>>There is also a nitpick on this subject that the teacups appear to be glued to the saucers.

I've seen real teacups like that. :) A bit frustrating if you're not expecting what happens next. And do you recall in Disney's "Alice," when the March Hare asks for just "half a cup," the Mad Hatter slices the cup in two, tea and all? I've also seen attempts to duplicate that joke with real dishware. Hmmm...

>>There are also teacups in the engine room in ANTR.

I guess I'm not so much bothered by that as I find Cameron's too-oft repeated visual simile of "the giant 'unsinkable' liner is actually fragile as bone china" just a tad tedious.

Roy
 
May 3, 2005
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Roy-

>>There are also teacups in the engine room in ANTR.<<

>>I find Cameron's too-oft repeated visual simile of "the giant 'unsinkable' liner is actually fragile as bone china" just a tad tedious.<<

The teacups in the engine room in ANTR appear to be of a more durable material than bone china. Look like some kind of metal as is the teapot, too.

Robert
 
May 3, 2005
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And back to the subject at hand. :
"Somebody to blame" :

Jack and Rose distracting the lookouts in "1997 Titanic"

Gifford and Annette distracting the Captain in "1953 Titanic". I still wonder what Jean Negulesco had in mind there ? Of course that movie isn't very long on historical accuracy.

Elementary, my dear Watson !
 
Feb 24, 2004
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>>The teacups in the engine room in ANTR appear to be of a more durable material than bone china.

And MacQuitty & Co. weren't nearly as hung up on visual similes. Y'know, Robert, I'd rather expect the engine room boys to be a little more practical than to use delicate china for their cuppa. '-)

>>Jack and Rose distracting the lookouts in "1997 Titanic". Gifford and Annette distracting the Captain in "1953 Titanic". I still wonder what Jean Negulesco had in mind there ?

Again, why would they *need* to be distracted, by teenagers or anyone else, for the Titanic to run into an iceberg? It seems so petty, and such an easy way out for the directors/writers.

Roy
 
May 3, 2005
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And in ANTR Captain Stanley Lord is shown having his cuppa tea on the bridge of Californian about the same time that Marconi Operator Cyril Evans delivers an ice warning....and the Captain is asking for more sugar in his cuppa. I don't know if there was supposed to be some hidden meaning there ? :)
 
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Donna Grizzle

Guest
>>And in ANTR Captain Stanley Lord is shown having his cuppa tea on the bridge of Californian about the same time that Marconi Operator Cyril Evans delivers an ice warning....and the Captain is asking for more sugar in his cuppa. I don't know if there was supposed to be some hidden meaning there ?<<

I'd say almost certainly there was. What the director was trying to establish I don't know. Unless there is actual testimony stating that Lord was sipping a cuppa tea at that time and demanding more sugar, then what is the point of having him do it at that precise moment? Baker decided to put it in there for some reason. Could have even been an unconscious decision but for some reason he thought we should see Lord sipping a cuppa tea. Could be something as simple as a stereotypical statement about Brits and their love for their tea, which I definitely perceived from watching Cameron's Titanic.
 

Matthew Smith

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Mar 12, 2006
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AHEM

Our love of tea??

oh well if i must

It's true we do love tea

However we do love coffee as well

FROM A BRIT
 
Feb 24, 2004
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Hi, Robert and Donna!

>>I don't know if there was supposed to be some hidden meaning there ?

No hidden meaning that I can see. But it does show that Captain Lord wasn't what you might term "cordial" with his men.

Hi, Matthew!

Nice! My grandmother came to the US from Glasgow, so I had something of an Old Country upbringing. Our home had both tea and coffee as well, but a tiny cup of tea (plenty of milk and sugar) with cookies and/or little sandwiches was always my after-school ritual. It wasn't until I was in my teens that I first tasted "straight" tea.

Roy
 

Inger Sheil

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Dec 3, 2000
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Lord and the extra sugar always amused me - I wondered if there was some negative subtext intended - perhaps something about it being a bit effeminate to have lots of sugar in your tea!
 

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