Someone fell on the First Class Grand Staircase


Yourj Benig

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Does anyone heard about a woman who fell on the Grand Staircase in the Afternoon of the 14 of April 1912............ I think she was Ms. Irene Harris........ the wife of Mr. Henry Harris, which she broke her arm....... Is that true???:eek:
 
Jan 6, 2005
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Yourj: Irene Harris did indeed fall that afternoon. She claimed later that there was a "wet place" on the stairs due to something having been mopped up.

Just think - at the time, she probably said something like, "Well, things can only get better after THIS."
 
Apr 18, 2011
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Yourj yes, this story is true Iréne Harris fell down the stairs after a spot of grease or slippery substance. Dr. William Francis Norman O'Loughlin wanted the neat but he wanted Iréne Harris remains outstretched arm so having learned that there was, Dr. Henry William Frauenthal in 1st class he nursed.
 
Jan 6, 2005
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You know, this is probably as good a place as any to speculate on what tricky footing that beautiful Grand Staircase must have been in any kind of a sea. The staircase's treads were linoleum. Lino is not slippery unless it's waxed, and the self-polishing waxes for lino (like Johnson's Glo-Coat) hadn't been invented yet, so that part was okay. But negotiating that staircase when the ship was rolling to any extent must have been, um, interesting.
 
J

Jaden Maxwell

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The website pierrefauchard.com.au says:

"Earlier in the day she had slipped on a teacake coming down the stairs to her cabin from the reading room and had broken her arm."

Her cabin was beside the Aft grand staircase on C-deck.


Here is the Reading and Writing room on A-deck and the direction that Mrs. Harris probably went.

staircase.png



Her cabin on C-deck beside the Aft Grand staircase.

cabinc.png
 
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Rob Lawes

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This is probably the only time in history when slipping on a teacake and breaking your arm is the second worst thing to happen to someone in a 24 hour period.

:D
 
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Rennette Marston

Rennette Marston
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The website pierrefauchard.com.au says:

"Earlier in the day she had slipped on a teacake coming down the stairs to her cabin from the reading room and had broken her arm."

Her cabin was beside the Aft grand staircase on C-deck.

Do you mean this article on the Titanic's hospitals?
On the morning of April 14, according to one source, first class passenger, Mrs. Henry Birkhardt Harris, 36, had tripped and fallen down one of the stair cases, breaking a small bone in her arm, which had been covered in a plaster cast by Assistant surgeon Simpson. Another account states that Mrs. Harris fell down the first class (grand staircase and broke her elbow. This account states that she had her arm set by Dr. Henry William Frauenthal of New York City, not by the ship’s surgeon or assistant surgeon. The woman found out that Dr. Frauenthal was on board and requested his services.

He was considered one of the country’s foremost pioneer joint specialists (orthopedic surgeon) (Butler 40). Dr. Frauenthal studied medicine at Bellevue Hospital in New York City. He established a hospital for joint diseases in 1906. Mrs. Harris survived the sinking of Titanic, as did the doctor and his wife. In the morning, after being taken off the lifeboat, she was observed to have a broken arm.

On May 11, 1912, Ada Patterson interviewed Mrs. Harris for the New York Evening Journal said she was “black garbed, with her right arm immovable in a plaster cast. Titanic, Women and Children First, states that in 1958, Mrs. Harris, who had previously met Walter Lord, the author of A Night to Remember, went to see the movie of the same name (Geller 51). She couldn’t sit through the whole film because of the memories it brought back. She remembers sitting in her stateroom with her husband Henry. Earlier in the day she had slipped on a teacake coming down the stairs to her cabin from the reading room and had broken her arm. The pain was intense and she was unable to sleep. As she sat with her arm in a sling across her chest in two bath robes to ward off the chill that had invaded the ship, she noticed that her clothing on the hangers in the wardrobe were swaying. They continued to sway until the engines stopped.
Pretty interesting story.
 
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Rob Lawes

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While we are on the subject of injuries, we know from a couple of sources that 2nd Engineer Shephard broke his leg falling through and open deck plate in boiler room 5. I've often wondered why more effort wasn't made to get him up to a boat?

On top of this earlier in the sinking another fireman needed medical attention after somehow getting a foot injury while later on another fireman had what appeared to be a serious hand injury.

As far as I can tell, neither of these peope were ever identified although the fireman with the hand injury is believed to have boarded a lifeboat.
 

Rennette Marston

Rennette Marston
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While we are on the subject of injuries, we know from a couple of sources that 2nd Engineer Shephard broke his leg falling through and open deck plate in boiler room 5. I've often wondered why more effort wasn't made to get him up to a boat?

On top of this earlier in the sinking another fireman needed medical attention after somehow getting a foot injury while later on another fireman had what appeared to be a serious hand injury.

As far as I can tell, neither of these peope were ever identified although the fireman with the hand injury is believed to have boarded a lifeboat.

Imagine the injuries people sustained after the Titanic broke in two. Would've been unimaginable.
 

Rob Lawes

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The whole night would have been horrific.

Around one thousand five hundred people killed in a few hours. Men, Women and Children.

As Winston Churchill once said (and has oft been used by forum member David G Brown), "the terrible ifs accumilate"

If only, if only, if only.
 
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