Somewhere in Time

Feb 24, 2004
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Hi, Shelley!

>I am always amazed to find so many Titanic historians are musically trained and like trains as well as ships.

I actually had to put my Titanic interest on hold all the years I was busy being a professional musician. As far as trains go, I've practically worshipped them from the time I was old enough to know they existed.

>I expect if we all got together in one room, we'd nearly have a symphony orchestra.

The RMST Philharmonic?? :)

>We should take a poll to see which instruments we all play.

Okay, I play piano (keyboards), but I also spent time with clarinet and percussion. I sang in the Seattle Opera Chorus for many years (bass section leader) and ended my 19 years with them with 5 years as assistant chorus master and vocal coach. Following that I conducted 3 seasons of Gilbert & Sullivan before I became partially disabled. I haven't done any music for the past few years, but that's left me lots of time to pursue my research project.

>If Cameron does a prequel or a sequel maybe we can work on the score!

It couldn't be any more inappropriate than Horner's! '-)

>Screaming flutes- now there's an audio.

If you're familiar with the music Kubrick used in "2001," check out the middle of the composition "Atmospheres" (by Gyorgy Ligeti - accent on "Li-"). There's a passage for 4 solo piccolos playing very closely together, very loudly, way up high! In the recording Kubrick used for his film, the microphones weren't able to record them without adding various loud shrieks and groans of their own (it's all preserved in the film audio). Later soundtrack CDs have filtered those noises out, I'm sorry to say.

Getting back to Titanic, one thing that's always irritated me, as a musician, is when a documentary voice-over says something like, "Wallace Hartley continued to conduct Titanic's orchestra," or "with a tap of his baton, Hartley, etc., etc." Groups that small never use a conductor any more than a string quartet needs a conductor. The music is pretty much all set tempo and any minor fluctuations can be dealt with by using body language. Also, the term "leader" (Hartley's title) has a specific meaning in Britain and it isn't "conductor." The leader is the first violinist, who in the US would be called the "concertmaster." It's a position that predates the modern conductor by quite a bit. (So there! -- Harrumph!)

Anyway, Shelley, here's my hope that your Christmas is truly lovely this year!

Roy
 
May 12, 2005
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Roy:

Thanks for clarifying about the date. I also had a look through some books and found that Shaw did complete the original script for Pygmalion in 1912.

Also, did you know about Franz Addelmann (sp?) being booked on Titanic? He was leader of the Seattle Orchestra and with his wife was returning from Europe. It was widely reported that they had been aboard Titanic, even that Mr. Addelmann had died. Variety and Billboard magazines both carried articles mentioning him. I have a copy of an April 27, 1912 issue of Billboard in which he’s reported among the casualties.

Of course, the Addelmanns weren’t aboard. But I have always wondered about their story. They were certainly lucky!

Randy
 

Jason D. Tiller

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Dec 3, 2000
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"I am always amazed to find so many Titanic historians are musically trained and like trains as well as ships."

Just as Roy is, I've been a huge train buff since I was a kid and can also play the keyboard.

"I expect if we all got together in one room, we'd nearly have a symphony orchestra."

Yes, I would agree with that. It would be very interesting to witness!
 
Mar 28, 2002
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Going back to My Fair Lady for a minute, I think the Ascot scene (in the 1964 film version) at least was set in June 1910. All the costumes were black or white and I'm told this was a reflection on the mood of the nation at the time, as the social elite were still in mourning for King Edward VII, who had died on 6th May 1910 and whose funeral was on the 20th of that month.

Incidentally, the King's funeral procession through the streets of London to his resting place at Windsor Castle was one of the first occasions that Kinemacolor colour news film was used.

Cheers,

Boz
 

Susan Alby

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Oct 22, 2004
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The 'Ascot' scene is my favorite in the movie, it epitomized the upper class society of the time. And the black and white costumes are spectacular!

"The Ria-yn in Spia-yn stays Mia-ynly in the Plia-yn!"

Cheers,
Susan
 
May 12, 2005
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Iain is right that mourning was in full evidence at the 1910 Ascot — it became known as Black Ascot and the press were out in force to record it. It took the dressmakers by surprise, especially Lucile, who had predicted that strict mourning would not be observed and even wrote an article for the American newspapers illustrated with designs in pastel colors. The sudden edict from Buckingham Palace caused a flurry of activity at fashion salons in London and Paris. Many toilettes were not completed with the result that some attendees had to go to the races in a "last season" dress or some other standy-by black frock.

I think either Cecil Beaton, in his book "Fair Lady," or a subsequent biographer has indeed identified Black Ascot as the inspiration for the movie’s race scenes, even though the action date was 1912.
 

Susan Alby

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Oct 22, 2004
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Hi Randy,
You seem to have a very impressive knowledge of Fashion. I enjoyed the colors and design on your "Lucile" web page. The piano music was also very pretty. Who was the composer?
 
May 12, 2005
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Hello Susan:

Fashion/theatre history is my main bag. My interest in Titanic is really from the perspective of cultural and decorative arts history.

Thanks for your compliment about the Lucile page. I can only take half the credit for it. The pictures and text are mine but the layout, color, design and music belong to Shelley Dziedzic's artistic eye and ear. In fact the site is actually part of her larger site, "Journeys in Time." I must say I’m very grateful to Shelley as I have received many project commissions thanks to the popularity of the site. It has even brought me into contact with relatives of Lucile employees and customers.

The music heard on the pages escapes me at the moment (there are three tunes, I think). The first I feel sure is "Traumerei" (sp?), which was played as the opening selection of music at each Lucile collection opening, beginning about 1904 till the early 20s. I am embarrassed to admit that I don’t know who composed it. Shelley will know more about it and the other music. She picked it all out.

I’d read about Traumerei being used by the string bands that played at Lucile’s shows but never heard the music until Shelley sent me her completed pages. It was so moving to finally hear it — yet terribly familiar, as though I’d known it always.

Randy
 

Susan Alby

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Oct 22, 2004
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Hello- great collaborative effort, Randy AND Shelley!!

I, too, have always had an interest in fashion and the decorative arts from a historical perspective. I also love music and have been singing for as long as I could talk. My two daughters sometimes get annoyed because I SING all the time.
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Thanks Susan and Randy. Yes, the Traumerei (Dreaming or Reveries) Opus 15 #7 Scenes from Childhood (Kinderszenen) is a piece every piano student has to learn and perform it would seem, myself included (so it must not be too difficult a piece!) As it was written for children, it is fairly easy to play, and offers possibility for great expressiveness and interpretation. Macdowell's "To a Wild Rose" on the opening page
www.revdma2.com/ldgenter.html is by American pianist and composer Edward Macdowell who was a Gilded Age darling, who had a mysterious end in 1908. Born in New York, studying in Germany, he retired to a big farm in New Hampshire where he had hoped to establish a sort of American salon for composers and performing artists. J.P. Morgan even contributed to the fund. MacDowell died of something referred to as "brain malady" after some sort of nervous breakdown- it was never fully explained, and was quickly hushed up. "To a Wild Rose" is from the Woodland Sketches Opus 51 #1 and is often compared to the work of Edvard Grieg in his lyric mode, in fact the two knew each other well. The last piece is one of Debussy's etudes.
 
Feb 24, 2004
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Hi, Shelley!

"Yes, the Traumerei (Dreaming or Reveries) Opus 15 #7 Scenes from Childhood (Kinderszenen) is a piece every piano student has to learn and perform it would seem, myself included (so it must not be too difficult a piece!) As it was written for children, it is fairly easy to play, and offers possibility for great expressiveness and interpretation."

Oh, Shelley, beware of those seemingly "simple" piano pieces because, like an iceberg, they're extremely deceptive. The notes are easy enough, but when you realize that playing just one note out context will bring the whole house of cards crashing down, those simple pieces can and do strike terror in the hearts of even the most accomplished pianists. I've known players who could bash their way through the most fiendish Prokofiev sonata (or the Paganini Rhapsody, which just bristles with notes) and emerge utterly unscathed, but who would break into a cold sweat when confronted with something as artless (and exposed) as Traumerei. It hits you where you live, because there's no place to hide.

BTW, my opinion of Kinderszenen is that it's about children, but not for children -- check out some of the other sections. Octavio Pinto also composed a "Scenes from Childhood," with a more 20th Century flavor. Very witty, but also technically nasty. If I remember, G. Schirmer is the publisher.

I would agree with your comparison of MacDowell to Grieg. :)
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Points well- made Roy- I only said I played it- not that I played it well! Yes indeed- it is haunting, poignant and goes right for the jugular under the hands of the right musician.
 
Apr 11, 2001
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For a real thrill in accidentals- try slaughtering the Rachmaninoff Theme on a Rhapsody by Paganini- the signature piece in Somewhere in Time. Never-but never try this one after a martini!
 
Feb 24, 2004
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"Never-but never try this one after a martini!"

Particularly if it's in its original key, right?. . . '-)

Do you remember the scene in Doctor Zhivago where a pianist is performing the Prelude in G minor and the woman turns to her companion, who's falling asleep, and says:

"Boris! This is genius!" And he replies:
"Really? I thought it was Rachmaninoff."

I don't know how many performances I've heard of the Rhapsody, but I keep coming back to the recording Rubinstein made with Reiner and Chicago back in the late 50s (or was it the early 60s? -- really good early stereo). I also have, from 78-rpm days, Rachmaninoff's own recording of all his concerti with Philadelphia -- pretty amazing fingers that old boy had!

There's a second recording of the SIT score, a re-recording actually, by John Debney and the Royal Scottish National Orchestra. The pianist in the Rhapsody is a Lynda Cochrane. I find myself listening to this CD more often than the soundtrack (blasphemy!); for one thing, it's more complete. And Cochrane plays the 18th Variation much better than her soundtrack counterpart -- it's almost a match for the Rubinstein/Reiner. The orchestra is every bit as good throughout and the French horn player on that one beautiful solo is dynamite. I think it's still in print if you haven't heard it.
 
May 8, 2001
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One of my best Christmas presents, (besides a Cunard cup and saucer)was the DVD and CD of Somewhere in Time. The documentary is just fabulous. I had a restful and educational Christmas day, watching the whole DVD.
I have to be careful listening to the CD while driving. I have become so involved in the beautiful music, I drive right pass my exit. Though, I have to admit, I find myself humming the theme (as best as I can) while working. Seems to make the day go by, at least happier!
Happy New year to you all.
C. Collier
 

Susan Alby

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Oct 22, 2004
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Hi-
Just saw SIT for the first time, I almost cried when I saw Christopher Reeves- it reminded me why I used to have such a CRUSH on him when he was Superman. There is no other actor in Hollywood today that parallel's his talent or his physical presence on screen.

The scenes he did with Jane Seymour were sexually electrifying. He was trying to be such a Gentleman, but when he finally got alone with her in her room, he could not help himself, nor could she resist him any longer.

Have to "review" those scenes again!
happy.gif


Susan
 
Feb 24, 2004
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>>There's a second recording of the SIT score, a re-recording actually, by John Debney and the Royal Scottish National Orchestra. The pianist in the Rhapsody is a Lynda Cochrane.

I gave this disc another listen over the weekend and was struck by one thing. In the film, the final credits roll to a recording of the main theme featuring Roger Williams and his famous "rolling" arpeggios. The Debney disc has no such music, just a lovely, unadorned restatement of the actual theme. However, it does end with the tag music (coda) from the movie. My first thought was that Debney recorded the music that Barry actually wrote and then, at some point, higher powers decided to splice in the Williams recording. Any comments?

It wouldn't be the first time something like that's been done. The Close Encounters credit music, for instance, exists in two distinct versions, depending on which "edition" you're watching. TRON is another example. Carlos wrote a specific cue, but ultimately, but it was replaced in the final cut by music recorded by "Journey."

Roy