Somewhere in Time

Kris Muhvic

Member
Sep 26, 2008
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One more thing about the suit that I thought of after my last post; I don't think the suit itself was really the point in the story. It, to me anyway, was a kind of joke: a play on perspective when it comes to history. It gave the audience an idea of when it comes to historical imaginings, we may be mistaken. There is I believe, a certain arrogance when assuming any detail in what we consider "back then". Here was this man who thought, "well- this will do!", and whoops! I mean, remember those old westerns where the cowboy comes across a homestead, and out of the soddy pops a pioneer-pretty, complete with bouffant and green eye shadow?! Ridiculous, yes, but that concept may take hold for many.

I think the little funny about the suit was simply a way of explaining the complexities when understanding, or attempting to, any given time period. Heck, I find that out all the time!

Still, I remember when my step-mother brought home the soundtrack record (yes...RECORD! That big round flat thing!) and played it, describing every detail of the movie to me, and listening to her- and my dad's groaning! A special film for me, always.

Take care~
Kris
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Jean-Pierre Doreac lavished such love on those 1912 costumes- he received an Oscar nomination in 1980 for them but lost out to TESS (also lovely but not memorable). Jean is a member of the Costumer Designers Guild, and has received countless Emmy nominations as well. He costumed all of Battlestar Galactica episodes. As tight as the budget was for Somewhere in Time, no corners were cut on Elise's gowns. The cream "Man of my Dreams" dress cost 33,000 to make and was promptly stolen after the wrap. The incredible good looks of Christopher Reeve were a factor in deciding to put him in a costume which was not the last word-it made him appear to disadvantage, slightly gauche and sympathetically vulnerable, all of which he was when he found himself at last confronted with his obsession. Conversely, Chris Plummer was a dapper dandy, reinforcing his in- control, superior position in the scope of the situation. We love Richard more because against all odds, he does triumph in the end. Very clever costuming all around- I guess clothes don't necessarily make the man!
 
S

sharon rutman

Guest
I'm not deliberately finding fault with the flick--simmer down! However, I'm only pointing out that everyone in l9l2 found fault with the suit--even Elise. Remember just before Richard's fate ful disappearing act back into the future she offers to buy him a new suit to replace it. He stares at her cluelessly, not comprehending why everyone is being so picky and critical of it. He goes on and on about how he just loves it because it has so many pockets and fits his frame so well. Then out of that mysterious little pocket -- poof -- out comes the l979 penny which sends him hurtling back to the present day. Ah well, can't please everyone, I guess.
 

Ed Weichsler

Member
Feb 4, 2004
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Shelley, I'm glad to hear you love the movie.
You might consider attending the re-union of the cast, crew, and fans of the movie that takes place EVERY autumn at the Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island (where the film was made). Thanks to my recent purchase of Randy Bigham's "Finding Dorothy", I learned that one of Dorothy Gibson's mangers was Charles Frohman (a victim of the Lusitania sinking).

When Richard Mathesson wrote "Bid Time Return" (aka Somewhere in Time) in 1976 he styled two characters after two real-life people. Elise was Maude Adams, & her manager Robinson was Charles Frohman.
The 1912 time line in S.I.T. was established by the screenwriter so there could be a living person in 1972 who would remember details from 1912.
In the book "Bid Time Return", the 1912 was actually in the late 1890's.

Those who also love "Somewhere in Time" might consider checking out our website at www.somewhereintime.tv . I.N.S.I.T.E. is the accronym for International Network of Somewhere In Time Enthusiasts. It co-organizes the annual (since 1991) re-union at the Grand Hotel (800-33-GRAND) as well as publishes a quarterly newsletter devoted to the cast & crew of the movie. The INSITE founder (Bill Shepard) wrote a book on the making of S.I.T. well worthy of reading.

Say what you want about the movie, but one must admit, it simply has the most therapeutic soundtrack ever made. This was curtesy of Rachmaoninoff & John Barry (Barry also did "Raise the Titanic" for Lord Grade).
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Hi Ed- Oh yes- I was a charter member of INSITE and know Matheson and Shepard well. I attended the first reunion at the Grand and was a costume judge back in 1991, and was thinking of going this year for the big 25th anniversary. I used to write quite a bit for the journal the first 2 years and did a comprehensive history of Frohman and Maude Adams for the publication. I can recommend the bio by Daniel Frohman about his brother- called Manager and Man. I am a huge fan of Maude Adams and have devoted a room in my house to her-what a fascinating person she was, and pure box office gold. I am saddened to learn that nearly nobody knows who she was today-and the rare soul knows her only for the role of Peter Pan. There are several good biographies on Maude. You can visit the Cenacle convent and retreat house at Lake Ronkonkoma, Long Island, and visit her house still, and her grave. I absolutely agree on the soundtrack, and still give it as a gift for all sorts of occasions along with the DVD, which is such an improvement over the old LP album and VCR tape! The clothes are stunning, and I feel the designer should have beat out Tess of the D'Urbervilles that year (1980)for Best Costumes.I have seen the film 83 times! Maybe I'll see you this year Ed- and come up and say "Is it you?"!!
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Here is a good site for Maude Adams. Lots of lovely photos- you can see how Matheson got inspired when he saw her photo-just as did Chris Reeve (Richard Collier). The Grand was used on location as the Hotel Del Coronado (setting for the novel) is in an area with too many airplane fly-overs for the 1912 scenes. Wish we could timetravel!
http://www.bookmice.net/darkchilde/maude/adams.html