Son Of God

  • Thread starter Christina DeMohrenschildt
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Jul 9, 2000
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Nah...probate involves lawyers and judges and takes even longer! (But at least you no longer have to care!)
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Dec 12, 1999
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So, it DOES involve bloodsuckers. I was right!!!!

(I know a smidge about probate, but that's it. I never would have to worry about that sort of thing, considering I won't be leaving anything behind of any worth for people to fight over).
 

Inger Sheil

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So, it DOES involve bloodsuckers. I was right!!!!
Erm...barring, I should think, the men and women of the legal profession - lawyers and judges among them - who are valued members of this on-line community. They don't advertise their occupations, but I can assure you that they're out there. Of course this is a joke, but I know too many members of the legal fraternity - both as friends and as family - to believe that vampiristic or leech tendencies are synonymous with the profession.

Now...who wants to have a sling at ivory-tower academics? Political spindoctors? Lazy backpackers? I've had a go at all of these occupations at some point in my life...
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Or even perhaps get back on-topic or let this thread die a natural death?
 
Jun 12, 2004
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Inger, I'm not one to speak up for Kritina, but I'm sure it's all in jest. I don't think any slamming here is meant to be harsh, at least not what I sense anyway. You claim to know several in the legal profession. Do any of them have a sense of humor?

Regarding the ivory-tower, I just so happen to live there, and I must say that I am proud of it, hehe. ;) Still, I take no offense by it. It's a matter of letting people have their say and not getting disturbed by it.

I do agree with one thing, though: we should get back on topic, which is, if I remember rightly, religion and the Titanic.

Just my two cents.
 

Inger Sheil

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I know what you're saying, Mark, which is why I tried to keep my comments light-hearted as well, and threw in the self-deprecating 'ivory tower' comment. I'm not proposing we ban lawyer jokes (or academic jokes, or car salesmen jokes, or journo jokes). This post was privately brought to my attention and, while I wouldn't want to come across too heavy handed, I thought that before it degenerates into anti-legal profession banter with no on-topic content in the posts (which is how it was heading), it was best to steer it back to the discussion or suggest we let it die.
 
Dec 12, 1999
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If it means anything (which of course it doesn't, considering the idiot it comes from), I'm far more bloodsuckerish than everyone who's ever existed. If anyone has a problem with this statement...well, they can't. So there, and that ends the topic. Bahboom.

Back to the original topic...religion and its role in the Titanic...any evidence of non-Christian views of the disaster and its role in the divine order of things? What was the Japanese view, for example? What about the Jewish perception of the events? Anyone of a Buddhist bent ever write a treatise on the disaster? And what has anyone ever suggested in terms of karma?
 
Jun 11, 2000
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"any evidence of non-Christian views of the disaster and its role in the divine order of things?"

Well, I'd be a bit surprised if there were. I know the Titanic is famous, but surely these other religions had more personal disasters in their own cultures from which to infer the wrath of whichever God they worshipped? Jewish Diaspora, earthquakes in Japan, drought in Muslim lands etc. etc.? In any case, inferring the wrath of a Christian God in the case of the Titanic seems a bit odd to me, as it sounds a very much more Old Testament impression of the Almighty, rather than New Testament. Mind you, I have to admit I'm groping back over quite a few decades here, to remember Methodist Sunday School Bible Class. The Methodist God did seem pretty strict about quite a few things (well, most things actually...) but always on the level of personal behaviour and responsibility - and did not seem given to catastrophic demonstrations against hubris. Aged about 12, I gave up on all this as I simply couldn't imagine why God might track the thoughts and actions of someone as insignificant as me. Aged about 16, I decided that moral and ethical issues are individual issues, and that humans are born alone, live alone (spiritually), and die alone. I know this is bleak, and I sometimes 'envy' people with faith, but I find it hard to contemplate joining them when someone proposes the idea that there are religious lessons to be learned from human failures and their consequent disasters.
The genesis of this thread is possibly doubtful, so I agree with Inger. Perhaps we should all voluntarily let it die now.
 

Dave Gittins

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In Steven Biel's Titanica, pages 66 and 70, there are Jewish and Mennonite comments on the disaster. (I'm not a good enough typist to type them out here.) There is probably a lot more Jewish material about because of the fame of Strauss and other Jewish passengers. Old New York papers intended for Jews would be the place to look.

Like others, the Jews wrote songs in memory of their people. The cover of one is in Titanica.

Offhand, I know of nothing from major non-Judeo/Christian religions. After all, few from outside that tradition were on board.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>any evidence of non-Christian views of the disaster and its role in the divine order of things? What was the Japanese view, for example?<<

I don't know if anyone has even explored that ground. As most of the passengers and crew represented the Judeao/Christian traditions, they're the ones who got all the press. I'm sure there were a few Muslims aboard in Third class among the immigrants, and some of the Asians would represent the religious traditions of those cultures (Buddahism, Shinto, etc.) but it would appear that little attention has been devoted to any of that.

A pity as I'm sure they'ed have some interesting insights.
 
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Cara G

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Ok, well first I would like to say that I am a Christian. I believe in God, and in Christ. I DO NOT believe that God had anything to do with the Titanic disaster. Is God not supposed to be a God of love, kindness and such? Why would he let innocent children and innocent men and women suffer in the cold atlantic water?

>>Second, has anyone seen the following biblical parallel to the lessons of the Titanic? What about the Genesis story of Israelites building the Tower of Babel? They thought their hard labor could match the work of the Son of God, then the Son of God reminded them of their limitations. <<

About this, first off, it WAS NOT the Israelites who built the tower of Babel. At this time, the Israelites were not yet a nation, therefore they did not build the tower of Babel. Also, they didn't want to match the work of God they wanted to make a name for themselves and reach God. If you are going to use scripture to prove a point, that actually contradicts scripture later on, at least can you get the story right?!
 
Jun 30, 2005
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I'm a believing Christan too, and I agree with Cara on both accounts.

I have also heard the connections made between God and the Titanic disaster, as well as other major accidents. I disagree with any claims that God made the Titanic sink, I don't think he works that way. If anything good came out of it, it was that people realized that they are not invincible, and therefore needed God.

Have any of you guys heard about a reverend who tried to persuade people to convert even after the Titanic went down? According to the rumour I've heard, one converted and finally survived to tell about it. But I don't know if this is true.
 

Cara Ginter

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yes, I actually have a book about him... gosh it would be sooo helpful right now if I remembered his name..... hmmmm, But the book is called "The Titanic's Last Hero"
 
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sashka pozzetti

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Because today is Sunday, I have been thinking about how the faith of passengers gave them strength in the disaster, or if they lost faith afterwards because what had happened. Lucile says she relied on New Thought, although I don't really know much about it. It seems to have been the trendy thing of the day for celebrities, a bit like Kabala is now. People were so religious then, and this must have been a big challenge to the most committed of Christians.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>People were so religious then, and this must have been a big challenge to the most committed of Christians.<<

I don't really know about that but I wouldn't count on it. When something happened, good or bad, it was simply taken for granted that one way or another, it was God's will. Some may have been influanced otherwise, but most wouldn't have given it a second thought,
 

Dave Gittins

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For the very young, the next year that is an exact duplicate of 1912 will be 2080. It is a leap year and Easter Sunday falls on 7 April. Those left alive can have a big commemoration party.
 

John Clifford

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Those left alive can have a big commemoration party.
That may include a 117-year old gent from California and a 104-year old Toronto resident.
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